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Why would I run gradle clean build instead of gradle build?

From what I understand, Gradle can detect source changes and update the final artifacts if needed. So why would I still need to clean?

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    To make sure errors you get are not from wrong indexing by gradle. Or if you added new libraries which change every dependency. Mar 13, 2015 at 9:31
  • "gradel clean build" helps to remove all dependencies which generated while last build and get new dependencies from server and build your project. Thanks
    – Naitik
    Mar 13, 2015 at 9:32
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    @Naitik, that's not true.
    – Opal
    Mar 13, 2015 at 9:41
  • so then, if I just change the code and want a new build, a 'gradle build' should be enough? And only if I change the dependencies should I run 'gradle clean build'? Mar 13, 2015 at 9:43
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    I think this is becoming a more interesting question now with incremental builds. Bazel says "Since Bazel does not need clean builds for correctness, the CI system should not be configured to clean before starting a build/test run.". I'd like to know if Gradle is getting closer to this goal, too.
    – mkobit
    Feb 22, 2016 at 21:33

4 Answers 4

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The clean task is defined by the java plugin and it simply removes the buildDir folder, thus cleaning everything including leftovers from previous builds which are no longer relevant. Not doing so may result in an unclean build which may be broken due to build artifacts produced by previous builds.

As an example assume that your build contains several tests that were failed and you decided that these are obsolete thus needs to be removed. Without cleaning the test results (using cleanTest task) or the build entirely (by running the clean task) you'll get stuck with the failed tests results which will cause your build to fail. Similar side effects can happen also with resources/classes removed from the sources but remained in the build folder that was not cleaned.

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  • thanks for answering. I'm aware what clean does, but I don't know a specific case of when it is useful. Can you provide such an example, for better understanding? Thanks. Mar 13, 2015 at 11:41
  • Sure. Assume that your build contains several tests that were failed and you decided that these are obsolete thus needs to be removed. Without cleaning the test results (using cleanTest task) or the build entirely (by running the clean task) you'll get stuck with the failed tests results which will cause your build to fail. Similar side effects can happen also with resources/classes removed from the sources but remained in the build folder that was not cleaned. Mar 13, 2015 at 12:03
  • Makes sense. Can you edit your answer to include this example so I can mark it as correct? Mar 13, 2015 at 12:41
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    I thought if you deleted test classes, that made the up-to-date check for test fail, which would result in running the tests again anyway.
    – Hakanai
    May 2, 2019 at 6:46
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    Basically: in a perfect world clean would never be necessary, but there are changes (mostly removals) that Gradle can't (reliably) detect. In those cases clean is the easy escape hatch. Oct 6, 2020 at 12:10
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It removes the build directory. (Build contains the output of the gradle operation) gradle clean demo

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Other build tools like buck will detect that some tests are removed and won't run them without the needs to run clean target. I think this is pitfall of gradle.

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    This is mostly inaccurate, Gradle has input and output tracking and almost all tasks can handle this case.
    – mkobit
    Oct 26, 2016 at 2:35
  • Gradle merely allows for more in-depth control over tasks and their input/output. However assumptions about when a task is up-to-date and when it will be executed are easily made - this contributes to the perception of Gradle as some kind of dark magic. Mar 25, 2019 at 13:29
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You don't need to run the clean task. Gradle will track task dependencies and clean appropriate parts for you. Here's an example Gradle project I created to show that the accepted answer is incorrect.

If custom tasks don't track their dependencies well (they're bugged), then clean is a workaround.

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