7

What is the fastest way to convert int to char? I need a faster way because,

convertingchar = Convert.ToChar(intvalue);

is my slowest part in the program. I have multiple different int values, that have to be converted to char. My project is very big and I can't post my function. That's why I post this test function.

My Code so far.

char convertingchar = ' ';
...some code...
public void convert(int intvalue){
   convertingchar = Convert.ToChar(intvalue);
}
13
  • 3
    How did you profile it? Mar 13 '15 at 10:05
  • 5
    Convert.ToChar eventually performs an explicit conversion as (char)value, where value is your int value. Before doing so, it checks to ensure value is in the range 0 to 0xffff, and throws an OverflowException if it is not. The extra method call, value/boundary checks, and OverflowException may be useful, but if not, the performance will be better if you just use (char)value.
    – Mahesh
    Mar 13 '15 at 10:06
  • 1
    I think I need a faster way than that, because after Perfomance testing in Visual studio this is my slowest part. Remember this is a test function. I just thought maybe there is a faster way to convert.
    – user4628051
    Mar 13 '15 at 10:06
  • 1
    @CyberDude remember this is a testfunction in my real project the funtion is more complex I just want to extract my problem
    – user4628051
    Mar 13 '15 at 10:10
  • 3
    If this is the most time consuming part of your program you might want to find a way of not converting each char separately or prevent the need of so many conversions
    – Emond Erno
    Mar 13 '15 at 10:10
20

Running a quick performance test between your Convert.ToChar approach and the mentioned casting one, I find that 65535 tests (char.MaxValue):

Convert: 00:00:00.0005447 total
Cast:    00:00:00.0003663 total

At its best, cast was running for me in about half the time of convert.

The implementation of Convert.ToChar as found in Reference Source reveals the time consumer:

public static char ToChar(int value) {
    if (value < 0 || value > Char.MaxValue) throw new OverflowException(Environment.GetResourceString("Overflow_Char"));
    Contract.EndContractBlock();
    return (char)value;
}

While these checks do certainly serve a purpose, your particular use-cases, especially in such a performance-critical situation, may not require them. That's up to you.

A nice alternative to enforce these checks would be to use a ushort rather than an int. Obviously that may or may not be attainable, but with the same maximum value, this means you'll get compile-time checking for what you were previously depending on ToChar to perform.

2
  • 3
    You can't understate the use of ushort here - it will make any boundary checks irrelevant, thus getting you speed and accuracy.
    – Trenin
    Mar 13 '15 at 18:14
  • 3
    @Trenin - while what you say is true, any effort you go to in order to supply the function with ushort instead of int, would be better served by creating char instead of either int, or ushort, and then not calling a char ToChar(char) function completely.... In other words, either he has ints and can't change that, or he can change that, and then should change to char, not ushort
    – rolfl
    Mar 13 '15 at 19:15
17

Convert.ToChar eventually performs an explicit conversion as (char)value, where value is your int value. Before doing so, it checks to ensure value is in the range 0 to 0xffff, and throws an OverflowException if it is not. The extra method call, value/boundary checks, and OverflowException may be useful, but if not, the performance will be better if you just use (char)value.

This will make sure everything is ok while converting but take some time while making sure of that,

convertingchar = Convert.ToChar(intvalue);

This will convert it without making sure everything is ok so less time,

convertingchar = (char)intvalue;

For example.

 Console.WriteLine("(char)122 is {0}", (char)122);

yields:

(char)122 is z


NOTE

Not related to question directly but if you feel that Conversion is slow then you might be doing something wrong. The question is why do you need to convert the lot of the int to char. What you are trying to achieve. There might be better way.

2
  • I am using your code know and it works just fine and is faster than my older solution
    – user4628051
    Mar 13 '15 at 14:34
  • Does (char)value not do the range check?
    – Random832
    Mar 13 '15 at 15:54
8

The fastest way, contrary to what the others have noted is to not run any code at all. In all the other cases, there is memory allocated for the int and memory allocated for the char. Thus the best that can be achieved is simply copy the int to the char address.

However this code is 100% faster, since no code is run at all.

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct Foo
{
    [FieldOffset(0)] 
    public int Integer;
    [FieldOffset(0)] 
    public char Char;
}

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288471%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

13
  • Though you will need to run code to move the values to and from those fields. Mar 13 '15 at 10:49
  • how are you now able to convert?
    – user4628051
    Mar 13 '15 at 10:50
  • Move an integer into the Integer field, and grab the character from the Char field. Mar 13 '15 at 10:51
  • @LasseVKarlsen yes you would need to have code move the value into Integer. In this case you gain nothing. But if you integrate the fields into the objects that read or write the values, then you can skip a single copy...
    – Aron
    Mar 13 '15 at 10:58
  • 3
    Your code is not portable, as it's effect depends on endianness (unless C# unifies that somehow, which is at least unlikely), and shouldn't make any difference for optimized performance (unless optimization is really bad).
    – Frax
    Mar 13 '15 at 13:04

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