I am trying to create a generic repository to access my database. In EF6 I was able to do that in order to get a specific entity:

protected IDbSet<T> dbset;

public T Get(object id)
{
    return this.dbset.Find(id);
}

DbSet in EF7 is missing a Find method. Is there a way to implement the above piece of code?

11 Answers 11

Here's a very crude, incomplete, and untested implementation of .Find() as an extension method. If nothing else, it should get you pointed in the right direction.

The real implementation is tracked by #797.

static TEntity Find<TEntity>(this DbSet<TEntity> set, params object[] keyValues)
    where TEntity : class
{
    var context = ((IAccessor<IServiceProvider>)set).Service.GetService<DbContext>();

    var entityType = context.Model.GetEntityType(typeof(TEntity));
    var key = entityType.GetPrimaryKey();

    var entries = context.ChangeTracker.Entries<TEntity>();

    var i = 0;
    foreach (var property in key.Properties)
    {
        var keyValue = keyValues[i];
        entries = entries.Where(e => e.Property(property.Name).CurrentValue == keyValue);
        i++;
    }

    var entry = entries.FirstOrDefault();
    if (entry != null)
    {
        // Return the local object if it exists.
        return entry.Entity;
    }

    // TODO: Build the real LINQ Expression
    // set.Where(x => x.Id == keyValues[0]);
    var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEntity), "x");
    var query = set.Where((Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>>)
        Expression.Lambda(
            Expression.Equal(
                Expression.Property(parameter, "Id"),
                Expression.Constant(keyValues[0])),
            parameter));

    // Look in the database
    return query.FirstOrDefault();
}
  • Thanks, @bricelam! This will work for now. – Lyudmil Dimitrov Mar 17 '15 at 17:31
  • Hi Brice, just curious if you have an updated version of this. I'm stuck with the line var entityType = context.Model.GetEntityType(typeof(TEntity));; since context has no Model property. I've changed var context = ((IAccessor<IServiceProvider>)set).Service.GetService<DbContext>(); to var context = ((IAccessor<IServiceProvider>)set).Service.GetService(typeof(DbContext)); – Lynn Crumbling Jul 16 '15 at 13:43
  • @LynnCrumbling I don't think Model has moved since we put it there; it's still in the nightly builds. To get the generic version of GetService, add using Microsoft.Framework.DependencyInjection; – bricelam Jul 16 '15 at 16:16
  • Many thanks! I found the generic IAccessor in Microsoft.Data.Entity.Infrastructure, but that makes a whole lot more sense that I'd need to use a GetService() that returns more than just an object. Cheers! – Lynn Crumbling Jul 16 '15 at 16:52
  • 6
    @LynnCrumbling I couldn't find the IAccessor generic in Microsoft.Data.Entity.Infrastructure, or anywhere else, for that matter. Am I missing some reference? – Shaul Behr Apr 20 '16 at 11:31

In case you are using EF 7.0.0-rc1-final, below you find a small update for the code presented by @bricelam in the previous answer. By the way, thank you very much @bricelam - your code was extremely useful for me.

Here are my dependencies under "project.config":

"dependencies": {
    "EntityFramework.Commands": "7.0.0-rc1-final",
    "EntityFramework.MicrosoftSqlServer": "7.0.0-rc1-final",
    "Microsoft.Framework.Configuration.Json": "1.0.0-beta8",
    "Microsoft.Framework.ConfigurationModel": "1.0.0-beta4",
    "Microsoft.Framework.ConfigurationModel.Json": "1.0.0-beta4",
    "Microsoft.Framework.DependencyInjection": "1.0.0-beta8"
}

And below is the extension method for DbSet.Find(TEntity):

using Microsoft.Data.Entity;
using Microsoft.Data.Entity.Infrastructure;
using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace Microsoft.Data.Entity.Extensions
{
    public static class Extensions
    {
        public static TEntity Find<TEntity>(this DbSet<TEntity> set, params object[] keyValues) where TEntity : class
        {
            var context = ((IInfrastructure<IServiceProvider>)set).GetService<DbContext>();

            var entityType = context.Model.FindEntityType(typeof(TEntity));
            var key = entityType.FindPrimaryKey();

            var entries = context.ChangeTracker.Entries<TEntity>();

            var i = 0;
            foreach (var property in key.Properties)
            {
                entries = entries.Where(e => e.Property(property.Name).CurrentValue == keyValues[i]);
                i++;
            }

            var entry = entries.FirstOrDefault();
            if (entry != null)
            {
                // Return the local object if it exists.
                return entry.Entity;
            }

            // TODO: Build the real LINQ Expression
            // set.Where(x => x.Id == keyValues[0]);
            var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEntity), "x");
            var query = set.Where((Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>>)
                Expression.Lambda(
                    Expression.Equal(
                        Expression.Property(parameter, "Id"),
                        Expression.Constant(keyValues[0])),
                    parameter));

            // Look in the database
            return query.FirstOrDefault();
        }
    }
}
  • Thanks this is what I needed :) – devqon Dec 17 '15 at 11:09
  • Suggestion: you have a capture to a modified closure, which makes this break. You should change the foreach loop to: var i1 = i; entries = entries.Where(e => e.Property(property.Name).CurrentValue == keyValues[i1]);i++ – Shaul Behr Apr 20 '16 at 10:09

Can't comment because of reputation, but if you use RC2 (or later?) you should use

var context = set.GetService<ICurrentDbContext>().Context;

instead of

var context = set.GetService<DbContext>();
  • Even if this appears to be a dirty hack using something that doesn't seem like I should use (ICurrentDbContext) it's working great inside it's parent dirty hack. And this is JUST where you should have put the answer, not in a comment. This is fantastic. – damccull Jun 29 '16 at 3:27
  • This fixed it for me which is what I needed until Find is implemented properly in EF7 – Martin Dawson Aug 1 '16 at 11:46
  • Nice, thank you! – rubStackOverflow Oct 5 '16 at 2:38

I've taken some of the previously provided answers and tweaked them to fix a couple of problems:

  • Implicitly captured closure
  • Key shouldn't be hard coded to "Id"

    public static TEntity Find<TEntity>(this DbSet<TEntity> set, params object[] keyValues) where TEntity : class
    {
        var context = set.GetService<DbContext>();
    
        var entityType = context.Model.FindEntityType(typeof(TEntity));
        var key = entityType.FindPrimaryKey();
    
        var entries = context.ChangeTracker.Entries<TEntity>();
    
        var i = 0;
        foreach (var property in key.Properties)
        {
            var i1 = i;
            entries = entries.Where(e => e.Property(property.Name).CurrentValue == keyValues[i1]);
            i++;
        }
    
        var entry = entries.FirstOrDefault();
        if (entry != null)
        {
            // Return the local object if it exists.
            return entry.Entity;
        }
    
        var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEntity), "x");
        var query = set.AsQueryable();
        i = 0;
        foreach (var property in key.Properties)
        {
            var i1 = i;
            query = query.Where((Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>>)
             Expression.Lambda(
                 Expression.Equal(
                     Expression.Property(parameter, property.Name),
                     Expression.Constant(keyValues[i1])),
                 parameter));
            i++;
        }
    
        // Look in the database
        return query.FirstOrDefault();
    }
    

So...the above find methods worked great, but if you don't have a column named "Id" in your model, the whole thing is going to fail on the following line. I'm not sure why the OP would have put a hardcoded value into this spot

  Expression.Property(parameter, "Id"),

Here's a revision that will fix it for those that name our Id columns appropriately. :)

var keyCompare = key.Properties[0].Name;

        // TODO: Build the real LINQ Expression
        // set.Where(x => x.Id == keyValues[0]);
        var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEntity), "x");
        var query = set.Where((Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>>)
            Expression.Lambda(
                Expression.Equal(
                    Expression.Property(parameter, keyCompare),
                    //Expression.Property(parameter, "Id"),
                    Expression.Constant(keyValues[0])),
                parameter));

        // Look in the database
        return query.FirstOrDefault();
    }

This STILL very well could fail if you have more than one Key setup on the entity object and the key you're looking up by isn't the first, but it should be quite a bit btter this way.

Not enough reputation to comment, but there is a bug in @Roger-Santana answer when using it in a console app/seperate assembly:

var i = 0;
foreach (var property in key.Properties)
{
    entries = entries.Where(e => e.Property(property.Name).CurrentValue == keyValues[i]);
    i++;
}
var entry = entries.FirstOrDefault();

The value of 'i' is captured in the foreach so that when entries.FirstOrDefault() is called, keyValues[i] has the value of (at least) keyValues[i++], which in my case crashed with an out of index error. A fix would be to copy the value of 'i' through the loop:

var i = 0;
foreach (var property in key.Properties)
{
   var idx =i;
    entries = entries.Where(e =>  e.Property(property.Name).CurrentValue == keyValues[idx]);
    i++;
}
var entry = entries.FirstOrDefault();
  • 1
    Thank you, thank you, thank you. When I hit this bug I wasn't looking forward to figuring it out. Instantly resolved and I didn't have to use my brain. Much appreciated. – BinarySolo Aug 25 '16 at 9:20

Find finally arrives into Entity Framework core.

I use linq; instead of Find method you can use:

var record = dbSet.SingleOrDefault(m => m.Id == id)
  • 1
    This is different than Find, Find can return entities that have not yet been submitted to the database, i.e. before you call SaveChanges. – John Leidegren May 6 '17 at 15:01

Let me contribute a revision that includes building the expression. I'll confess I didn't actually test this ;-)

    public static TEntity Find<TEntity>(this DbSet<TEntity> dbSet, params object[] keyValues) where TEntity : class
    {
        // Find DbContext, entity type, and primary key.
        var context = ((IInfrastructure<IServiceProvider>)dbSet).GetService<DbContext>();
        var entityType = context.Model.FindEntityType(typeof(TEntity));
        var key = entityType.FindPrimaryKey();

        // Build the lambda expression for the query: (TEntity entity) => AND( entity.keyProperty[i] == keyValues[i])
        var entityParameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TEntity), "entity");
        Expression whereClause = Expression.Constant(true, typeof(bool));
        uint i = 0;

        foreach (var keyProperty in key.Properties) {
            var keyMatch = Expression.Equal(
                Expression.Property(entityParameter, keyProperty.Name),
                Expression.Constant(keyValues[i++])
            );

            whereClause = Expression.And(whereClause, keyMatch);
        }

        var lambdaExpression = (Expression<Func<TEntity,bool>>)Expression.Lambda(whereClause, entityParameter);

        // Execute against the in-memory entities, which we get from ChangeTracker (but not filtering the state of the entities).
        var entries = context.ChangeTracker.Entries<TEntity>().Select((EntityEntry e) => (TEntity)e.Entity);
        TEntity entity = entries.AsQueryable().Where(lambdaExpression).First(); // First is what triggers the query execution.

        // If found in memory then we're done.
        if (entity != null) { return entity; }

        // Otherwise execute the query against the database.
        return dbSet.Where(lambdaExpression).First();
    }

here is what I use. Not a find method, but works like a charm

var professionalf = from m in _context.Professionals select m;
professionalf = professionalf.Where(s => s.ProfessionalId == id);
Professional professional = professionalf.First();
  • 1
    I'm sure the OP knows about First. Find is quite different in many ways. – Gert Arnold Oct 16 '15 at 20:05

An edit was proposed to change ".First()" to ".FirstOrDefault()" in the very last line of my earlier post. The edit was voted down, but I agree with it. I would expect the function to return null if the key was not found. I would not want it to throw an exception. In most cases I would want to know if the key existed in the set, and handling an exception is a very slow way of figuring that out.

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