15

This is the solution I came up, in my models.py:

from django.db import models

@classmethod
def model_field_exists(cls, field):
    try:
        cls._meta.get_field(field)
        return True
    except models.FieldDoesNotExist:
        return False

models.Model.field_exists = model_field_exists

And use it like:

Post.field_exists('title') # > True or False

The problem comes with foreign keys, my Post model belongs to a Category, this check works:

Post.field_exists('category') # > True

But this one doesn't:

Post.field_exists('category_id') # > False

This is the actual field name in db and I need to check for it like this. How can I do it in django?

  • Should you check the category model itself in that case? – C.B. Mar 13 '15 at 14:35
  • What do you mean? I need to check if 'category_id' is a valid field name for the model 'Post'. – lucaswxp Mar 13 '15 at 14:38
  • If category is a foreign key, and id belongs to category, then Post does not have that field, so why wouldn't you call Category.field_exists('id') – C.B. Mar 13 '15 at 14:58
  • Hey @C.B., I think you misunderstood. Let me explain my case: I have a flat dictionary coming from a webservice. This dict contains data for both models, Post and Category fields, I need to programmatically separate which field belongs to each model. In this case "category_id" field belongs to the "Post" model. – lucaswxp Mar 13 '15 at 15:03
  • You should mark your answer as correct. – n3storm Jan 23 '17 at 17:29
9

hasattr(cls,field) will not work in all cases, for example where mixins are used. A safe test is:

            try:
                model._meta.get_field(field)
                .. do stuff here
            except FieldDoesNotExist:
                pass

or

            field = None
            try:
                field = model._meta.get_field(field)
            except FieldDoesNotExist:
                pass

            if field:
              .. do stuff here
  • This does not solve his problem that category_id isn't found with get_field. – RemcoGerlich Sep 8 '16 at 10:55
4

You can use getattr to return a default value if the field does not exist.. like below

getattr(table, field, False)
  • in this way you check also properties and methods – zvadym Jun 4 at 16:49
4

Your 'category_id' field is a hidden field in the terminology of https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.10/ref/models/meta/ . It can't be retrieved by get_field.

Maybe loop over all the fields and check their names; get_fields can return hidden fields:

for field in cls._meta.get_fields(include_hidden=True):
    if field.name == field:
        return True
return False

If you need to care about fields that have their db_column changed from their default, you can test field.db_column too (but it is unset if it wasn't set explicitly).

3

But this one doesn't:

Post.field_exists('category_id') # > False

This is the actual field name in db and I need to check for it like this. How can I do it in django?

The case for everything aside from the _id part is sufficiently answered in the other answer. For handling the _id cases, you would basically need a special conditional in addition to that answer to appropriately deal with these cases. Something resembling this:

if field_name.endswith('_id'):
    try:
        field = model._meta.get_field(field_name.strip('_id'))
    except FieldDoesNotExist:
        return False
    if not f.is_relation:
        return False
    return True

The additional check is needed to assure that the field minus _id returns a ForeignKey, as opposed to some other type of field that just happens to have the same name, which would mean the name_id field on the model is invalid.

1

Why do you need this? The idea of Object Relational Mappers is for the classes to describe/define the database. So if you want to test the type of a Model you should use isinstance like so:

if isinstance(model, Post):
    # model is a Post, Post has a publish()
    model.publish()
elif isinstance(model, Comment):
    # model is a Comment, Comment has a foo()
    model.foo()

Your model definitions define your schema. There should not be a reason to have to test for the existence of a field. If there is, you might not be following best practice by assigning fields with setattr?

  • I agree if you are only using features provided by Django out of the box, you should avoid manually setting or accessing things other than the suggested way. However, there's a need to write more generic logic like for a base class or mixin to keep the code DRY, and hard-coding models in if-else block will end up with a lot of copy-pasting. In such case, dynamically checking if fields exist in a model seems more reasonable to me. Still, it depends on what you want to achieve. – Shaung Cheng Apr 2 at 20:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.