40

I know you can set variables with one line if/else statements by doing var variable = (condition) ? (true block) : (else block), but I was wondering if there was a way to put an else if statement in there. Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks everyone!

103

Sure, you can do nested ternary operators but they are hard to read.

var variable = (condition) ? (true block) : ((condition2) ? (true block2) : (else block2))
  • 11
    Yeah, in this case if() { ... } else if() { ... } else { ... } is probably more readable. – Spencer Wieczorek Mar 13 '15 at 22:43
  • 1
    Any ternary operators are hard to read. They're terse and not descriptive. Even non programmers have an idea what if () else () might mean. – Almo Mar 14 '15 at 2:43
29

tl;dr

Yes, you can... If a then a, else if b then if c then c(b), else b, else null

a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) : b) : null)

a
  ? a
  : b
      ? c
        ? c(b)
        : b
      : null

longer version

Ternary operator ?: used as inline if-else is right associative. In short this means that the rightmost ? gets fed first and it takes exactly one closest operand on the left and two, with a :, on the right.

Practically speaking, consider the following statement (same as above):

a ? a : b ? c ? c(b) : b : null

The rightmost ? gets fed first, so find it and its surrounding three arguments and consecutively expand to the left to another ?.

   a ? a : b ? c ? c(b) : b : null
                 ^                  <---- RTL
1.            |1-?-2----:-3|
             ^ <-
2.        |1-?|--2---------|:-3---|
     ^ <-
3.|1-?-2-:|--3--------------------|

result: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) : b) : null)

This is how computers read it:

  1. Term a is read.
    Node: a
  2. Nonterminal ? is read.
    Node: a ?
  3. Term a is read.
    Node: a ? a
  4. Nonterminal : is read.
    Node: a ? a :
  5. Term b is read.
    Node: a ? a : b
  6. Nonterminal ? is read, triggering the right-associativity rule. Associativity decides:
    node: a ? a : (b ?
  7. Term c is read.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? c
  8. Nonterminal ? is read, re-applying the right-associativity rule.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? (c ?
  9. Term c(b) is read.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b)
  10. Nonterminal : is read.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) :
  11. Term b is read.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) : b
  12. Nonterminal : is read. The ternary operator ?: from previous scope is satisfied and the scope is closed.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) : b) :
  13. Term null is read.
    Node: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) : b) : null
  14. No tokens to read. Close remaining open parenthesis.

    Result is: a ? a : (b ? (c ? c(b) : b) : null)

Better readability

The ugly oneliner from above could (and should) be rewritten for readability as:
(Note that the indentation does not implicitly define correct closures as brackets () do.)

a
  ? a
  : b
      ? c
        ? c(b)
        : b
      : null

for example

return a + some_lengthy_variable_name > another_variable
        ? "yep"
        : "nop"

More reading

Mozilla: JavaScript Conditional Operator
Wiki: Operator Associativity


Bonus: Logical operators

var a = 0 // 1
var b = 20
var c = null // x=> {console.log('b is', x); return true} // return true here!

a
  && a
  || b
      && c
        && c(b) // if this returns false, || b is processed
        || b
      || null

Using logical operators as in this example is ugly and wrong, but this is where they shine...

"Null coalescence"

function(mayBeNull) {
  var cantBeNull = mayBeNull || 42             // "default" value
  var alsoCantBe = mayBeNull ? mayBeNull : 42  // ugly...
  ..
}

Short-circuit evaluation

false && (anything) // is short-circuit evaluated to false.
true || (anything)  // is short-circuit evaluated to true.

Logical operators
Null coalescence
Short-circuit evaluation

3

I know this is an old thread, but thought I'd put my two cents in. Ternary operators are able to be nested in the following fashion:

var variable = conditionA ? valueA : (conditionB ? valueB: (conditionC ? valueC : valueD));

Example:

var answer = value === 'foo' ? 1 :
    (value === 'bar' ? 2 : 
        (value === 'foobar' ? 3 : 0));
3

In simple words:

var x = (day == "yes") ? "Good Day!" : (day == "no") ? "Good Night!";
  • It works fine and do test instead of guessing. – Masood Aslami Apr 2 at 3:10
  • nope your syntax is incorrect, you're missing a : on your nested ternary statement. Test in a browser... – fyllepo Apr 2 at 13:47
2

This is use mostly for assigning variable, and it uses binomial conditioning eg.

var time = Date().getHours(); // or something

var clockTime = time > 12 ? 'PM' : 'AM' ;

There is no ElseIf, for the sake of development don't use chaining, you can use switch which is much faster if you have multiple conditioning in .js

1

You can chain as much conditions as you want. If you do:

var x = (false)?("1true"):((true)?"2true":"2false");

You will get x="2true"

So it could be expressed as:

var variable = (condition) ? (true block) : ((condition)?(true block):(false block))

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