14

Is there any simple way(i.e., script) to watch file in powershell and run commands if file changes. I have been googling but can't find simple solution. Basically I run script in powershell and if file changes then powershell run other commands.

EDIT

Ok I think I made a mistake. I don't need script, a need function that I can include in my $PROFILE.ps1 file. But still, I was truing hard and still I'm unable to write it, so I will give bounty. It have to look like this:

function watch($command, $file) {
  if($file #changed) {
    #run $command
  }
}

There is a npm module that is doing what I want, watch , but it only watches for folders not files, and it's not powershell xD.

  • I have expanded my answer to include solution specific to your requirements. Is this what you were after? – Jan Chrbolka Apr 7 '15 at 3:16
27

Here is an example I have found in my snippets. Hopefully it is a little bit more comprehensive.

First you need to create a file system watcher and subsequently you subscribe to an event that the watcher is generating. This example listens for “Create” events, but could easily be modified to watch out for “Change”.

$folder = "C:\Users\LOCAL_~1\AppData\Local\Temp\3"
$filter = "*.LOG"
$Watcher = New-Object IO.FileSystemWatcher $folder, $filter -Property @{ 
    IncludeSubdirectories = $false
    NotifyFilter = [IO.NotifyFilters]'FileName, LastWrite'
}
$onCreated = Register-ObjectEvent $Watcher -EventName Created -SourceIdentifier FileCreated -Action {
   $path = $Event.SourceEventArgs.FullPath
   $name = $Event.SourceEventArgs.Name
   $changeType = $Event.SourceEventArgs.ChangeType
   $timeStamp = $Event.TimeGenerated
   Write-Host "The file '$name' was $changeType at $timeStamp"
   Write-Host $path
   #Move-Item $path -Destination $destination -Force -Verbose
}

I will try to narrow this down to your requirements.

If you run this as part of your "profile.ps1" script you should read The Power of Profiles which explains the different profile scripts available and more.

Also, you should understand that waiting for a change in a folder can't be run as a function in the script. The profile script has to be finished, for your PowerShell session to start. You can, however use a function to register an event.

What this does, is register a piece of code, to be executed every time an event is triggered. This code will be executed in the context of your current PowerShell host (or shell) while the session remains open. It can interact with the host session, but has no knowledge of the original script that registered the code. The original script has probably finished already, by the time your code is triggered.

Here is the code:

Function Register-Watcher {
    param ($folder)
    $filter = "*.*" #all files
    $watcher = New-Object IO.FileSystemWatcher $folder, $filter -Property @{ 
        IncludeSubdirectories = $false
        EnableRaisingEvents = $true
    }

    $changeAction = [scriptblock]::Create('
        # This is the code which will be executed every time a file change is detected
        $path = $Event.SourceEventArgs.FullPath
        $name = $Event.SourceEventArgs.Name
        $changeType = $Event.SourceEventArgs.ChangeType
        $timeStamp = $Event.TimeGenerated
        Write-Host "The file $name was $changeType at $timeStamp"
    ')

    Register-ObjectEvent $Watcher -EventName "Changed" -Action $changeAction
}

 Register-Watcher "c:\temp"

After running this code, change any file in the "C:\temp" directory (or any other directory you specify). You will see an event triggering execution of your code.

Also, valid FileSystemWatcher events you can register are "Changed", "Created", "Deleted" and "Renamed".

  • Hm it is suppose to block the shell while it's running, like every watch function. – IGRACH Apr 9 '15 at 22:58
  • Fair enough, I must have misunderstood your question a bit. Maybe you can edit and add that as a requirement. Also, are you waiting for just one change in a file, or multiple? – Jan Chrbolka Apr 9 '15 at 23:09
  • Great answer, @JanChrbolka tiny minor issue, the output is missing a closing " in the string. (SO edits needs to be 6 chars) – Crypth Jun 8 '15 at 14:51
  • @Crypth, Thanks for that, I have fixed the typo. – Jan Chrbolka Jun 8 '15 at 22:01
7

I will add another answer, because my previous one did miss the requirements.

Requirements

  • Write a function to WAIT for a change in a specific file
  • When a change is detected the function will execute a predefined command and return execution to the main script
  • File path and command are passed to the function as parameters

There is already an answer using file hashes. I want to follow my previous answer and show you how this can be accomplish using FileSystemWatcher.

$File = "C:\temp\log.txt"
$Action = 'Write-Output "The watched file was changed"'
$global:FileChanged = $false

function Wait-FileChange {
    param(
        [string]$File,
        [string]$Action
    )
    $FilePath = Split-Path $File -Parent
    $FileName = Split-Path $File -Leaf
    $ScriptBlock = [scriptblock]::Create($Action)

    $Watcher = New-Object IO.FileSystemWatcher $FilePath, $FileName -Property @{ 
        IncludeSubdirectories = $false
        EnableRaisingEvents = $true
    }
    $onChange = Register-ObjectEvent $Watcher Changed -Action {$global:FileChanged = $true}

    while ($global:FileChanged -eq $false){
        Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 100
    }

    & $ScriptBlock 
    Unregister-Event -SubscriptionId $onChange.Id
}

Wait-FileChange -File $File -Action $Action
4

You can use the System.IO.FileSystemWatcher to monitor a file.

$watcher = New-Object System.IO.FileSystemWatcher
$watcher.Path = $searchPath
$watcher.IncludeSubdirectories = $true
$watcher.EnableRaisingEvents = $true

See also this article

  • Well I find that on google but as I sad how to make it in a function that will watch file, and fire commands? – IGRACH Mar 15 '15 at 22:14
  • Take a look at this reference – bytecode77 Mar 15 '15 at 22:17
  • Well I have been reading this, and I have no idea what to do. I'm using powershell for quite a while, and have many functions written but this is so confusing. – IGRACH Mar 15 '15 at 22:22
  • 2
    It's all there. I can't really re-write it much simpler than that. You have to put at least some effort in it yourself. – bytecode77 Mar 15 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    FYI Jan's answer is much better. Shows how to get the output from the watcher – Kolob Canyon Jul 24 '17 at 15:27
3
  1. Calculate the hash of a list of files
  2. Store it in a dictionary
  3. Check each hash on an interval
  4. Perform action when hash is different

function watch($f, $command, $interval) {
    $sha1 = New-Object System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1CryptoServiceProvider
    $hashfunction = '[System.BitConverter]::ToString($sha1.ComputeHash([System.IO.File]::ReadAllBytes($file)))'
    $files = @{}
    foreach ($file in $f) {
        $hash = iex $hashfunction
        $files[$file.Name] = $hash
        echo "$hash`t$($file.FullName)"
    }
    while ($true) {
        sleep $interval
        foreach ($file in $f) {
            $hash = iex $hashfunction
            if ($files[$file.Name] -ne $hash) {
                iex $command
            }
        }
    }
}

Example usage:

$c = 'send-mailmessage -to "admin@whatever.com" -from "watch@whatever.com" -subject "$($file.Name) has been altered!"'
$f = ls C:\MyFolder\aFile.jpg

watch $f $c 60
3

Here is the solution I ended up with based on several of the previous answers here. I specifically wanted:

  1. My code to be code, not a string
  2. My code to be run on the I/O thread so I can see the console output
  3. My code to be called every time there was a change, not once

Side note: I've left in the details of what I wanted to run due to the irony of using a global variable to communicate between threads so I can compile Erlang code.

Function RunMyStuff {
    # this is the bit we want to happen when the file changes
    Clear-Host # remove previous console output
    & 'C:\Program Files\erl7.3\bin\erlc.exe' 'program.erl' # compile some erlang
    erl -noshell -s program start -s init stop # run the compiled erlang program:start()
}

Function Watch {    
    $global:FileChanged = $false # dirty... any better suggestions?
    $folder = "M:\dev\Erlang"
    $filter = "*.erl"
    $watcher = New-Object IO.FileSystemWatcher $folder, $filter -Property @{ 
        IncludeSubdirectories = $false 
        EnableRaisingEvents = $true
    }

    Register-ObjectEvent $Watcher "Changed" -Action {$global:FileChanged = $true} > $null

    while ($true){
        while ($global:FileChanged -eq $false){
            # We need this to block the IO thread until there is something to run 
            # so the script doesn't finish. If we call the action directly from 
            # the event it won't be able to write to the console
            Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 100
        }

        # a file has changed, run our stuff on the I/O thread so we can see the output
        RunMyStuff

        # reset and go again
        $global:FileChanged = $false
    }
}

RunMyStuff # run the action at the start so I can see the current output
Watch

You could pass in folder/filter/action into watch if you want something more generic. Hopefully this is a helpful starting point for someone else.

2

I had a similar problem. I first wanted to use Windows events and register, but this would be less fault-tolerant as the solution beneath.
My solution was a polling script (intervals of 3 seconds). The script has a minimal footprint on the system and notices changes very quickly. During the loop my script can do more things (actually I check 3 different folders).

My polling script is started through the task manager. The schedule is start every 5 minutes with the flag stop-when-already-running. This way it will restart after a reboot or after a crash.
Using the task manager for polling every 3 seconds is too frequent for the task manager. When you add a task to the scheduler make sure you do not use network drives (that would call for extra settings) and give your user batch privileges.

I give my script a clean start by shutting it down a few minutes before midnight. The task manager starts the script every morning (the init function of my script will exit 1 minute around midnight).

  • How is polling every 3 seconds more fault tolerant then subscribing to an event that is generated the moment a change occurs. Depends on your requirements, but in 3 seconds you cuould miss thousands of events. – Jan Chrbolka Apr 6 '15 at 12:32
  • In my situation a have a few files every minute. Files that arrive when my program is still starting up and not yet listening or a windows service being restarted, I do not care about those. When you take precautions and look to things like blogs.msdn.com/b/winsdk/archive/2014/10/29/… using events should be reliable too. – Walter A Apr 6 '15 at 12:45
  • That's fair enough, personally I find FileSystemWatcher events very reliable, as I have not run into the buffer limitations yet. In my code I was looking for small temp files that only appear for a fraction of a second. – Jan Chrbolka Apr 7 '15 at 3:22
0

Here is another option.

I just needed to write my own to watch and run tests within a Docker container. Jan's solution is much more elegant, but FileSystemWatcher is broken within Docker containers presently. My approach is similar to Vasili's, but much lazier, trusting the file system's write time.

Here's the function I needed, which runs the command block each time the file changes.

function watch($command, $file) {
    $this_time = (get-item $file).LastWriteTime
    $last_time = $this_time
    while($true) {
        if ($last_time -ne $this_time) {
            $last_time = $this_time
            invoke-command $command
        }
        sleep 1
        $this_time = (get-item $file).LastWriteTime
    }
}

Here is one that waits until the file changes, runs the block, then exits.

function waitfor($command, $file) {
    $this_time = (get-item $file).LastWriteTime
    $last_time = $this_time
    while($last_time -eq $this_time) {
        sleep 1
        $this_time = (get-item $file).LastWriteTime
    }
    invoke-command $command
}

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