2

Coming from an Excel VBA background I would frequently write code such as:

Range("myRange").Offset(0, 1).Resize(1, ccData).EntireColumn.Delete

I'm now moving to VSTO, and have been reading about RCW counters, etc., and the need to explicitly release COM objects. The basic advice seems to be: don't chain together references to Excel objects (as I have above) - hence "one dot good, two dots bad". My question is, am I correct that the above code is not the way to go in VSTO? If so, does that mean that I would need to explicitly declare the 3 ranges implied in the above chain (Offset, Resize & EntireColumn)?

Or even how about something like:

rng.Columns.Count

where rng is a declared Range? Should I be assigning a name to rng.Columns in order to obtain the number of columns in the range??

6
  • 1
    Depends, if you are making an Excel add-in via VSTO in .NET, the double dot warning won't apply because the COM references are in-process. Excel exited fine for me and disappeared from Task Manager even with my double-dot-using add-ins. I'm actually surprised RCW has this limitation. I would do x.y.z[n] all the time in c++ out-of-process COM no problems
    – user585968
    Mar 16, 2015 at 0:29
  • Thanks. There seems to be a lot of contradictory advice out there. Sometimes that all COM objects should be declared and released (in a finally block), but don't use FinalReleaseComObject. Now I just read on MSDN: "use the ReleaseComObject only if it is absolutely required...consider using the FinalReleaseComObject method instead."
    – COG
    Mar 16, 2015 at 15:08
  • 1
    I prefer your answer, though(!). What I'm developing is actually an Excel application built around an Excel workbook, rather than an add-in. Does that make a difference to your answer? I ended up down this rabbit hole after Excel started crashing on me. I guessed it was caused by memory issues caused by unreleased COM objects.
    – COG
    Mar 16, 2015 at 15:12
  • Thanks for the additional info. Both Excel Workbook extension and Excel add-in project types are implemented as in-process COM servers (.dll) that Excel will instantiate. Because they are in-process, memory will be freed automatically when Excel exits. Use double-dot to your hearts content - it won't matter and is completely safe. Don't use Marshal.ReleaseComObject(). Double-dot in-process won't lead to Excel crashing. All those interim objects those doom-Sayers are yelling about will be released during the next .NET Garbage Collection.
    – user585968
    Mar 16, 2015 at 23:40
  • Slightly off-topic - I just checked, if you make say a WinForms app that launches Excel (Ole Automation Server) via COM, you can safely use double dot in your WinForms code as well. When you are done either wait for the next GC to free-up memory and thus quit Excel or to force the issue do a GC.Collect(); GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); and Excel will vanish from Task Manager. In this scenario Excel is running out-of-process to my WinForms app and still managed to shutdown when expected, even with double dot
    – user585968
    Mar 16, 2015 at 23:56

3 Answers 3

7

There is very detrimental cargo cult behind that "two dot rule" silliness, it completely fails to keep C# programmers out of trouble since version 4. And it endlessly more painful than the simple way to make Office programs quit on demand.

But this is not a problem you have at all, the cargo cult only applies to an out-of-process program that use Automation to activate an Office program. Your code in fact runs inside the Office program, you of course don't care when the program terminates. Because that terminates your code as well.

Just write your code the way you'd write regular C# code, the GC does not need any help.

8
  • 3
    The Marshal.ReleaseComObject and 'two-dot' misunderstandings have gotten completely out of hand. Please keep spreading that message: The .NET GC works fine with COM.
    – Govert
    Mar 16, 2015 at 19:48
  • Next we will be seeing the cultists complain about temporary iterator objects that are created in foreach loops and will want them banned. Sigh. Another fine post Hans!
    – user585968
    Mar 16, 2015 at 23:48
  • @MickyDuncan, don't paint it as black&white, there is a certain time and place where the amount of unreclaimed RCWs after an iteration can undesireably keep an external object alive for too much time, e.g. the amount of open file handles or USER and GDI objects, or when participating in a legacy COM+ transaction, where a call to Release without a previous call to SetComplete will still commit and you want that to happen fast, etc.
    – acelent
    Mar 17, 2015 at 1:57
  • Cargo cult can go both ways. Just use the necessary tools, analyse, think for yourself, don't take any general opinion without understanding it and questioning it. If forcing GC has always worked for you, can't you at least try to imagine real cases where it wouldn't, or where the GC overhead would become noticeable and probably unbearably high (e.g. heavy duty server processing)?
    – acelent
    Mar 17, 2015 at 2:03
  • 1
    @PauloMadeira "there is a certain time and place where the amount of unreclaimed RCWs after an iteration can undesireably keep an external object alive for too much time" - So? Use GC. Why use a potentially dangerous API method such as Marshal.ReleaseComObject which is code smell for an unmatched COM AddRef/Release when GC can be used just as effectively and without risk.
    – user585968
    Mar 17, 2015 at 2:20
1

am I correct that the above code is not the way to go in VSTO?

Yes, you are on the right avenue. You need to declare different objects to release them later. Use System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject to release an Office object when you have finished using it. Then set a variable to Nothing in Visual Basic (null in C#) to release the reference to the object.

You can read more about that in the Systematically Releasing Objects article. It is related to Outlook, but the same principles can be applied to all Office applications.

BTW: it doesn't depend on VSTO. It comes from the COM world...

3
  • "It comes from the COM world" - Incorrect, it is a .NET issue where orphaned .NET objects pending GC are holding a reference to an unmanaged resource - a COM object. We c++ COM programmers never had any issue with so called "double-dot" - in-process or out-of-process otherwise. It is not necessary to call ReleaseComObject explicitly. That's just another Microsoft-recommended bad practice that has lead to nothing but confusion.
    – user585968
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:08
  • I do not agree with you. Do you want to say that a reference counter comes from the .Net world? :) Mar 17, 2015 at 11:38
  • No. However I would prefer you clarify your last statement in your answer as it is open to interpretation
    – user585968
    Mar 17, 2015 at 14:55
0

As often happens with small affirmations, the double-dot rule needs further explanation. You can use it as a mnemonic.

The reason is that each new RCW you get in .NET will hold a reference to the respective COM object. So, if you have (assuming obj is an RCW and this is the first time you're getting the other objects):

obj.Property[0].MethodThatReturnsAnotherObject()
//     1     2                  3

you're getting 3 additional RCWs. As you can see, there is only 1 extra dot. Although properties are probably the most common way of obtaining other COM objects, it's not the only way.

Usually, each RCW will only release the underlying COM object when it's garbage collected, unless you use Marshal.ReleaseComObject. Only use this method if you are completely sure you're the only one using the RCW you're releasing.


To be perfectly clear about this subject:

Only use ReleaseComObject or FinalReleaseComObject if you really, demonstrably have to, and you are completely, totally sure your piece of code is the only one referring to the RCW.


<type> propObj;
try
{
    propObj = obj.Property;
    <type> propArrayObj;
    try
    {
        propArrayObj = propObj[0];
        <type> propArrayObjReturn;
        try
        {
            propArrayObjReturn = propArrayObj.MethodThatReturnsAnotherObject();
        }
        finally
        {
            if (propArrayObjReturn != null) Marshal.ReleaseComObject(propArrayObjReturn);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (propArrayObj != null) Marshal.ReleaseComObject(propArrayObj);
    }
}
finally
{
    if (propObj != null) Marshal.ReleaseComObject(propObj);
}

This is tedious, a wrapper might help here:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Threading;

public class ComPtr<T> : IDisposable where T : class
{
    public ComPtr(T comObj)
    {
        if (comObj == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("comObj");

        if (!typeof(T).IsInterface)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("COM type must be an interface.", "T");
        }
        // TODO: check interface attributes: ComImport or ComVisible, and Guid

        this.comObj = comObj;
    }

    private T comObj;

    public T ComObj
    {
        get
        {
            // It's not best practice to throw exceptions in getters
            // But the alternative might lead to a latent NullReferenceException
            if (comObj == null)
            {
                throw new ObjectDisposedException("ComObj");
            }

            return comObj;
        }
    }

    ~ComPtr()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    // IDisposable
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        #if !RELEASECOMPTR

        // Option 1: Safe.  It might force the GC too often.
        // You can probably use a global limiter, e.g. don't force GC
        // for less than 5 seconds apart.
        if (Interlocked.Exchange(ref comObj, null) != null)
        {
             // Note: GC all generations
            GC.Collect();
            // WARNING: Wait for ALL pending finalizers
            // COM objects in other STA threads will require those threads
            // to process messages in a timely manner.
            // However, this is the only way to be sure GCed RCWs
            // actually invoked the COM object's Release.
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        }

        #else

        // Option 2: Dangerous!  You must be sure you have no other
        // reference to the RCW (Runtime Callable Wrapper).
        T currentComObj = Interlocked.Exchange(ref comObj, null);
        if (currentComObj != null)
        {
            // Note: This might (and usually does) invalidate the RCW
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(currentComObj);
            // WARNING: This WILL invalidate the RCW, no matter how many
            // times the object reentered the managed world.
            // However, this is the only way to be sure the RCW's
            // COM object is not referenced by our .NET instance.
            //Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(currentComObj);
        }

        #endif
    }
}

This would make the previous example a bit friendlier:

using (var prop = new ComObj<type>(obj.Property))
{
    using (var propArray = new ComObj<type>(prop.ComObj[0]))
    {
        using (var propArrayReturn = new ComPtr<type>(propArray.ComObj.MethodThatReturnsAnotherObject()))
        {
        }
    }
}

To avoid the ComObj property, you could implement a proxy, but I'll leave that as an exercise. Specifically, make an efficient proxy generation instead of forwarding by reflection.

4
  • Unless you are expert in COM and you should avoid calling Marshal.ReleaseComObject, instead just set objects to null and wait for the next GC. If you are not careful you can cause the COM server to crash
    – user585968
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:15
  • You don't have to be a COM expert, but I agree you should be really careful about releasing RCWs, I pointed that out. But in some very specific cases, you can achieve early COM object release without provoking a GC, which you can't tell if it's global or not. Now, for an addin or any hosted environment, or when you'll access and keep references to an uncontrollable set of COM objects, or even the slightest doubt whether you're calling a method directly or a property's default dispatch action, just don't use this technique.
    – acelent
    Mar 17, 2015 at 1:12
  • It's a best practice like not using Task.Factory.StartNew everywhere. Now you have to make sure your code does not accidentally call Marshal.ReleaseComObject twice or that the object is not a singleton. Why go down that alley of potential risk?
    – user585968
    Mar 17, 2015 at 2:33
  • Actually, ReleaseComObject may be invoked as many times as you want. But I generally agree with you, this is a tool to be used with care, and if it's really, demonstrably needed. I updated my answer to include an example that forces GC after nulling the reference to the RCW.
    – acelent
    Mar 17, 2015 at 10:11

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