85

i.e.:

<form 1>
<input type="hidden" name="url" value="1">
</form 1>

and

<form 2>
<input type="hidden" name="url" value="2">
</form 2>

Is this allowed and valid?

1

7 Answers 7

71

Yes, it is valid

This is Good

<form name="form1">
  <input type="hidden" name="url" value="1">
</form>

<form name="form2">
  <input type="hidden" name="url" value="2">
</form>

This is also fine and will generally be interpreted as an array of values, e.g. {url: [1, 2]}, depending on what your server does. In a URL encoding, it will look like url=1&url=2.

<form name="form1">
  <input type="hidden" name="url" value="1">
  <input type="hidden" name="url" value="2">
</form>
5
  • 31
    It is valid. It will create no confusion for the server side language (even PHP, with its conventions for naming fields that share a name, will consistently and predictably handle multiple inputs which don't use that convention). It will create no confusion for JavaScript (which will present the elements as a collection and not ignore one of them). It /might/ create confusion for authors who write code without knowing what they are doing, but it is fine by the spec.
    – Quentin
    May 25, 2010 at 17:58
  • @David Dorward: Thanks for explaining that, I removed that part.
    – Web Logic
    May 25, 2010 at 18:00
  • 15
    This post is misleading. inputs with the same name is the same form are part of the HTML standard - they are used, e.g., for checkboxes.
    – beldaz
    Aug 26, 2015 at 1:40
  • 1
    It is valid to place multiple inputs (hidden or otherwise) with the same name within a single form. Moreover, it's quite useful when submitting structured lists or associative maps, and is often much cleaner (and less brittle) than hacky DIY serialization.
    – candu
    May 18, 2016 at 17:56
  • 1
    I know this is an old post, but a point of clarification. PHP needs you to tell it the elements are forming an array like so: <code> <input type="hidden" name="url[]" value=....... </code> If you don't do this, php will take the last value of the last field and plug it into the form array for the key "url".
    – Mark C.
    Aug 1, 2019 at 12:49
15

Yes.

More, it is essential if you are dealing with radio button groups.

2
  • Exactly. Or with checkboxes, in which case you can put [] at the end "url[]" and it creates an array to be picked up. May 25, 2010 at 17:15
  • 2
    @Kerry — That's a PHPism. Most form handling libraries are quite happy to not have special names for groups of controls.
    – Quentin
    May 25, 2010 at 17:56
8

"This is Not Good" parses correctly on every browser I know of; if two url's appear in the url encoded string, it will be treated as an array. Try this in JQuery:

$('<form name="form1">\
     <input type="hidden" name="url" value="1">\
     <input type="hidden" name="url" value="2">\
</form>').serialize()

and you will get: "url=1&url=2"

a well-written query string parser will return a json structure like this:

 {"url":["1", "2"]}

Is it strictly spec? Nope, but neither is creating a multi-line string by escaping the EOL with a backslash, as I did above.

5

Yes -- each will only submit with their respective forms.

If you have them in the same form, one will override the other and it is not valid.

EDIT: As pointed out by Mahmoodvcs that the overriding only occurs in some languages (such as PHP) as is not inherent within HTML itself.

6
  • 13
    You are wrong. If you have multiple inputs with the same name, one will not override the other one. All inputs will be appended to the request's body in the order they appear in html. And it's valid: HTML form with multiple hidden control elements of the same name Jul 28, 2015 at 9:26
  • 5
    @Mahmoodvcs: This is not strictly true. If the form is posted to a PHP service, then the last value wins. If you want multiple values assigned to a name, then each name must end in '[]'. Oct 7, 2015 at 19:23
  • 6
    We are talking about HTML here, not PHP. Oct 9, 2015 at 23:00
  • 2
    @yardpenalty -- I don't understand your question (unsure if Jeff will respond), but if you're questioning PHP's ability, this is definitely true (at least prior to PHP7 -- I haven't checked if they've changed that yet) Apr 19, 2016 at 0:01
  • Sorry I have figured that out. If you are going to process using php you have to make name array. I think it is bootstrap who needs radio buttons to have same name or something. Anyways, yes you can. Apr 19, 2016 at 11:59
2

To test if it is valid or not, creat you page and test at W3C here :

http://validator.w3.org/

1
2

A) Your first example is okay, because the forms time of submission will be different:

<form id="1">
    <input type="hidden" name="url" value="1">  
</form>
<form id="2">
    <input type="hidden" name="url" value="2">  
</form>

B) Your second example is also okay, but not standard coding practice:

<form>
    <input type="hidden" name="url" value="1">  
    <input type="hidden" name="url" value="2">  
</form>

Java code two extract both values:

Map<String,String[]> parmMap = requestObj.getParameterMap();   
String input1 = parmMap.get("url")[0];   
String input2 = parmMap.get("url")[1];
0
<form>
    <input type="hidden" name="url[]" value="1">  
    <input type="hidden" name="url[]" value="2">  
</form>

In PHP you will get values with $_POST['url']

for($i=0;$i<count(url);$i++)
echo $_POST['url'][$i];

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