6

Per the setup:

$GOPATH/
  github.com/ddavison/project/
    subpackage/
      lib.go
    main.go

lib.go

package subpackage
...
func Hello() {
  fmt.Println("hello")
}

main.go

package main
...
func main() {
  ...
}

func DoSomething() {
  fmt.Println("done!")
}

From main.go, I know that I am able to call lib.go's functions by doing

import "github.com/ddavison/project/subpackage"
lib.Hello()

But how can I do the inverse, call a method from main.go from lib.go? How can I call DoSomething() from lib.go?

11

Go's funtions are first-class. Pass the named function DoSomething as a parameter to the lib function.

You'd have a circular dependency if anything else was allowed to reference main.

lib.go

package subpackage
...

type Complete func()

func Hello(complete Complete) {
  fmt.Println("hello")
  complete()
}

main.go

package main
...
func main() {
  subpackage.Hello(DoSomethign)
}

func DoSomething() {
  fmt.Println("done!")
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • so what would you recommend in replacement? a shared utils file that contains all the shared methods within? – ddavison Mar 16 '15 at 13:14
  • Also, my syntax is horribly off. I've been away from Go for a little bit now :) – Chris Pfohl Mar 16 '15 at 13:22
  • And on, just pass the function reference into the other library. That's no big deal. – Chris Pfohl Mar 16 '15 at 13:23
  • 1
    Naming a package util is usually bad and a sign you haven't thought out the relationship between functions and/or the parts of your program. – Dave C Mar 16 '15 at 17:06
  • 1
    @DaveC you're probably right. i'm still a new gopher trying to figure out how to lay out my projects, and how things work. thanks for linking that. i looked it over, and makes perfect sense – ddavison Mar 16 '15 at 17:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.