1

I tested the following code with gcc 4.9.0 and clang 3.5.0. The program outputs 'true' as expected. However, if I remove the comment in front of the enum it turns into 'false'. What is going on here? How can I make sure the has_mem boolean is set to true. My final goal is to have a member function in struct A, which is enabled via enable_if only if class T has a certain member function.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/tti/has_member_function.hpp>

BOOST_TTI_HAS_MEMBER_FUNCTION(func)

template<class T>
struct A
{
  //enum : bool { has_mem= has_member_function_func<T,void,boost::mpl::vector<const T &> >::value };
  A()
  {
    std::cout << std::boolalpha
      << has_member_function_func<T,void,boost::mpl::vector<const T &> >::value
      << "\n";
  }
};

struct B : public A<B>
{
  void func( const B& ) {}
};

int main()
{
  B b;
}
3
  • At first glance, it looks like the result of the type function is memoized in the enumerator initializer, and later reused in the constructor. Note that the type function in the ctor is evaluated during instantiation, which might change the result.
    – dyp
    Mar 17 '15 at 18:58
  • I think what you want is impossible in the general case: Consider two mutually dependent functions. The CRTP uses the base clause, which requires instantiating the base prior to instantiating the derived type. Hence, the derived type cannot be inspected from within the instantiation of the base type. The definition of member functions (and NSDMI etc) are instantiated later, therefore they can inspect the derived class.
    – dyp
    Mar 17 '15 at 19:09
  • Of course, you can postpone evaluation of the type function, e.g. by making its evaluation dependent on the template-parameter of a member (function) template, much like I postponed evaluation in my example above. This will make the application in your question work.
    – dyp
    Mar 17 '15 at 19:50
0

I figured out the following approach solves my problem.

#include <iostream>
struct empty_ {};

template<class derT>
struct A
{
  A( derT * ptr ) : m_ptr( ptr )  {}
  //
  template<class T=empty_>
  void  func()  { m_ptr->f(); }
private:
  derT  *m_ptr;
};

struct B : public A<B>
{
  B() : A<B>( this )  {}
  void  f()  { std::cout << "B::f\n"; }
};

struct C : public A<C>
{
  C() : A<C>( this )  {}
  void  g()  { std::cout << "C::g\n"; }
};

int main()
{
  B b;
  C c;
  b.func();
  c.g();
  // Does not compile (as disired) since class C does not have a function f()
  //c.func();
}

It works, because function func is a template function such that SFINAE takes care of the enable_if functionality.

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