4

An object of mine has an integer ID. Since this is a required property I am not defining it as an optional and I am requiring it in the designated initializer:

class Thing {

    var uniqueID: Int
    var name: String?

    init (uniqueID: Int) {
        self.uniqueID = uniqueID
    }       

}

Since I am creating one of these from some JSON, the usage is along the lines of:

if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
    let thing = Thing(uniqueID: unique)
}

Next, I would like to be able to add a convenience initializer to the Thing class that accepts the dictionary object and sets the properties accordingly. This includes the required uniqueID and some other optional properties. My best effort so far is:

convenience init (dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) {
    if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
        self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID)
        //set other values here?
    }
        //or here?
}

But of course this isn't sufficient since the designated initializer isn't called on all paths of the conditional.

How should I be handling this scenario? Is it even possible? Or should I accept that uniqueID must be an optional?

5

You have a couple of options with this one. One is a failable initialisers:

convenience init?(dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) {
    if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
        self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID)
    } else {
        self.init(uniqueID: -1)
        return nil
    }
}

Technically this can be tweaked a bit (mainly depending on your preference/version of swift), but my person preference is something as follows:

class func fromDictionary(dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) -> Thing? {
    if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
        return self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID)
    }

    return nil
}

All together, as a playground:

class Thing {
    var uniqueID: Int
    var name: String?

    init(uniqueID: Int) {
        self.uniqueID = uniqueID
    }

    convenience init?(dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) {
        if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
            self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID)
        } else {
            self.init(uniqueID: -1)
            return nil
        }
    }

    class func fromDictionary(dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) -> Thing? {
        if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
            return self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID)
        }

        return nil
    }
}

let firstThing = Thing(uniqueID: 1)
let secondThing = Thing(dictionary: ["id": 2])
let thirdThing = Thing(dictionary: ["not_id": 3])
let forthThing = Thing.fromDictionary(["id": 4])
let fithThing = Thing.fromDictionary(["not_id": 4])
  • I see - so the dictionary builder is no longer an initializer. I had;t considered that. Dammit now I have to re-figure out why convenience initializers are even used at all. Back to the docs. – Ben Packard Mar 16 '15 at 21:32
  • @BenPackard Convenience initialisers are useful in a few cases, but I usually only use them when it's not failable since swift's failable initialisers are a bit of a pain due to having to give a value to every stored property. – Joseph Duffy Mar 16 '15 at 21:39
  • @nhgrif In this case I am suggesting the removal of the dictionary-accepting initialiser and instead opting for a class function to perform a similar job, leaving the only init method being the one that accepts all arguments and can not fail, as you suggest? – Joseph Duffy Mar 16 '15 at 21:39
  • @JosephDuffy I removed my comment. I think I misread something. – nhgrif Mar 16 '15 at 21:40
4

The best solution is probably to use a failable initializer, which will either return an instantiated object or nil.

Because Swift objects cannot be partially constructed and convenience initializers must call a non-convenience initializer, we must still do something in the failure case.

The result will look something like this:

convenience init?(dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) {
    if let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int {
        self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID)
    } else {
        self.init(uniqueID: 0)
        return nil
    }
}

Generally speaking, our non-convenience initializer(s) should be one that accepts all arguments, and convenience initializers should be methods which don't require some of the arguments.

For example, I might make my default initializer look like this:

init(uniqueID: Int, name: String? = nil) {
    self.uniqueID = uniqueID
    self.name = name
}

This allows us to call the constructor in several different ways:

let thing1 = Thing(1)
let thing2 = Thing(2, nil)
let thing3 = Thing(3, "foo")
let thing4 = Thing(4, myUnwrappedStringVar)
let thing5 = Thing(5, myWrappedStringOptional)

And that already covers a lot of use cases for us.

So, let's add another convenience initializer that accepts an optional Int.

convenience init?(uniqueID: Int? = nil, name: String? = nil) {
    if let id = uniqueID {
        self.init(uniqueID: id, name: name)
    } else {
        self.init(uniqueID: 0)
        return nil
    }
}

Now we can take an Int? for our uniqueID argument and just fail when it's nil.

So, one more to accept the dictionary.

convenience init?(dictionary: [String: AnyObject]) {
    let uniqueID = dictionary["id"] as? Int
    let name = dictionary["name"] as? String
    self.init(uniqueID: uniqueID, name: name)
}

We still have the slightly weird initialize then return nil pattern in our first convenience constructor, but everything else we build on top of this can simply call that convenience initializer and doesn't require the weird pattern.

In the initializer that takes the dictionary, if there's no id key, or if it's something that's not an Int, then the let uniqueID will be nil, so when we call the other constructor, it will call the one that accepts an Int?, be passed nil, return nil, and therefore the one we called will return nil.

  • I see, thanks. Would you consider this an unusual setup? I ask because this is some of the first Swift I have written so I would like to use 'standard' patterns wherever possible (and where they exist). How would you handle this if it were your code? Just let the ID be optional? – Ben Packard Mar 16 '15 at 21:30
  • 1
    I don't think this is too particularly odd necessarily. What I would do entirely depends on a lot more context. If you're really interested in figuring out the best way to do this, you can always post a question on Code Review with a working version of your code. – nhgrif Mar 16 '15 at 21:33
  • 1
    @BenPackard I've expanded my answer. Perhaps it'll help you out. Implement these methods as such and set a breakpoint to trace the execution path through this code when you initialize with a dictionary. – nhgrif Mar 16 '15 at 21:58
  • 1
    Some objects don't make sense until all of their instance variables have values. Consider an object that's supposed to represent a rectange. In order for any instance of this object to make sense, we must have a height and a width. As for objects with lots of properties? Other than something UI-related that's going to have a lot of UI elements as properties, I've never found the need to create a class with so many properties that were all necessary at initialization time. – nhgrif Mar 16 '15 at 22:45
  • 1
    Given the simplicity of your Thing class, it's very easy to take in the name parameter (optionally) without really overcomplicating things. And it's nice to allow the user to do this in the initializer. With 20 properties, it might be a different story... but you might need some more abstraction if you've got an object with 20 properties. I'd have to see a concrete example though. – nhgrif Mar 16 '15 at 22:46

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