66

I am trying to write a code that executes when a condition is met. Currently, I am using while...loop, which I know is not very efficient. I am also looking at AutoResetEvent() but i don't know how to implement it such that it keeps checking until the condition is true.

The code also happens to live inside an async method, so may be some kind of await could work?

private async void btnOk_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
        // Do some work
        Task<string> task = Task.Run(() => GreatBigMethod());
        string GreatBigMethod = await task;

        // Wait until condition is false
        while (!isExcelInteractive())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Excel is busy");
        }

        // Do work
        Console.WriteLine("YAY");
 }


    private bool isExcelInteractive()
    {
        try
        {
            Globals.ThisWorkbook.Application.Interactive = Globals.ThisWorkbook.Application.Interactive;
            return true; // Excel is free
        }
        catch
        {
            return false; // Excel will throw an exception, meaning its busy
        }
    }

I need to find a way to keep checking isExcelInteractive() without CPU stuck in a loop.

Note: There is no event handler in Excel that would be raised when it is not in edit mode.

4
  • 1
    who change isExcelInteractive value?
    – Peyman
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:37
  • isExcelInteractive() is a method to check if excel is busy. It will return true if excel is not in edit mode. It is something I need to keep checking until it is true and there is no event handler for this
    – Keylee
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:41
  • I guess you don't need async method here, have you checked my answer?
    – Peyman
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:46
  • Is this a Windows forms application? If so, then you can just disable the OK button at the beginning of the click event handler and enable it again at the end of the handler. That way your application will stay responsive.
    – Tarik
    Apr 8, 2019 at 5:25

8 Answers 8

74

At least you can change your loop from a busy-wait to a slow poll. For example:

    while (!isExcelInteractive())
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Excel is busy");
        await Task.Delay(25);
    }
1
  • 15
    I did thought about this. Is this a common practice? I am still very new to programming.
    – Keylee
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:51
53

Ended up writing this today and seems to be ok. Your usage could be:

await TaskEx.WaitUntil(isExcelInteractive);

code (including the inverse operation)

public static class TaskEx
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Blocks while condition is true or timeout occurs.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="condition">The condition that will perpetuate the block.</param>
    /// <param name="frequency">The frequency at which the condition will be check, in milliseconds.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">Timeout in milliseconds.</param>
    /// <exception cref="TimeoutException"></exception>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static async Task WaitWhile(Func<bool> condition, int frequency = 25, int timeout = -1)
    {
        var waitTask = Task.Run(async () =>
        {
            while (condition()) await Task.Delay(frequency);
        });

        if(waitTask != await Task.WhenAny(waitTask, Task.Delay(timeout)))
            throw new TimeoutException();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Blocks until condition is true or timeout occurs.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="condition">The break condition.</param>
    /// <param name="frequency">The frequency at which the condition will be checked.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout in milliseconds.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static async Task WaitUntil(Func<bool> condition, int frequency = 25, int timeout = -1)
    {
        var waitTask = Task.Run(async () =>
        {
            while (!condition()) await Task.Delay(frequency);
        });

        if (waitTask != await Task.WhenAny(waitTask, 
                Task.Delay(timeout))) 
            throw new TimeoutException();
    }
}

Example usage: https://dotnetfiddle.net/Vy8GbV

7
  • could you please share how should "Func<bool> condition" looks ? Thanks in advance, cause you have one of the most beautiful approaches.
    – Ustin
    Jul 12, 2019 at 10:52
  • 1
    @Ustin I added a link to a fiddle with example usage of WaitUntil(...) as an inline Func<bool> and another example as a function pointer of the same signature. It would be the same for WaitWhile(...). Basically use any function that takes no parameters and returns a bool. That function will be run on the specified interval as many times as it takes for it to evaluate to true or until it times out. Jul 17, 2019 at 16:22
  • 1
    A couple of caveats: 1. Shouldn't it be while( !condition() ) (negated) ? 2. Why do you use async for your threaded polling instead of Task.Run( () => { while (!condition()) { Thread.Sleep(pollDelay); } }); 3. I would add a cancellation token while (!condition() && !ct.IsCancellationRequested) and Task.Delay(timeout, ct); 4. I would also rename the method to WaitWhileAsync and WaitUntilAsync. 5. Finally, I think you should delgate the choice of using a new thread with Task.Run and maybe use instead a non-threaded polling async method such as await PollConditionAsync(). Apr 3, 2020 at 10:44
  • 2
    Is there a NuGet package that already includes this functionality?
    – minus one
    Dec 8, 2020 at 12:09
  • 1
    Can I just, if the 'condition' is never true yet the 'timeout' is reached wont that task continue to run indefinitely? Should there be a cancellation token for that task which is cancelled with the 'timeout'? If so how might that look?
    – TheGrovesy
    May 24, 2021 at 8:55
17

You can use thread waiting handler

private readonly System.Threading.EventWaitHandle waitHandle = new System.Threading.AutoResetEvent(false);
private void btnOk_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Do some work
    Task<string> task = Task.Run(() => GreatBigMethod());
    string GreatBigMethod = await task;

    // Wait until condition is false
    waitHandle.WaitOne();
    Console.WriteLine("Excel is busy");
    waitHandle.Reset();

    // Do work
    Console.WriteLine("YAY");
 }

then some other job need to set your handler

void isExcelInteractive()
{
   /// Do your check
   waitHandle.Set()
}

Update: If you want use this solution, you have to call isExcelInteractive() continuously with specific interval:

var actions = new []{isExcelInteractive, () => Thread.Sleep(25)};
foreach (var action in actions)
{                                      
    action();
}
8
  • Is it your answer? Whether isExcelInteractive access to waitHandle, if not you need to share this object between both methos
    – Peyman
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:43
  • I am not sure this answer would work. What is calling isExcelInteractive()? This doesnt seem check isExcelInteractive() continuously
    – Keylee
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:49
  • so you have to use @Ben solution, or call isExcelInteractive() method with specific interval
    – Peyman
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:55
  • I like his implementation too. Very simple.
    – Keylee
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:57
  • Yes it is. If you need only in one place you can use his solution, otherwise you can use my (complicated) solution :)
    – Peyman
    Mar 17, 2015 at 1:01
8

This implementation is totally based on Sinaesthetic's, but adding CancellationToken and keeping the same execution thread and context; that is, delegating the use of Task.Run() up to the caller depending on whether condition needs to be evaluated in the same thread or not.

Also, notice that, if you don't really need to throw a TimeoutException and breaking the loop is enough, you might want to make use of cts.CancelAfter() or new CancellationTokenSource(millisecondsDelay) instead of using timeoutTask with Task.Delay plus Task.WhenAny.

public static class AsyncUtils
{
    /// <summary>
    ///     Blocks while condition is true or task is canceled.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="ct">
    ///     Cancellation token.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="condition">
    ///     The condition that will perpetuate the block.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pollDelay">
    ///     The delay at which the condition will be polled, in milliseconds.
    /// </param>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <see cref="Task" />.
    /// </returns>
    public static async Task WaitWhileAsync(CancellationToken ct, Func<bool> condition, int pollDelay = 25)
    {
        try
        {
            while (condition())
            {
                await Task.Delay(pollDelay, ct).ConfigureAwait(true);
            }
        }
        catch (TaskCanceledException)
        {
            // ignore: Task.Delay throws this exception when ct.IsCancellationRequested = true
            // In this case, we only want to stop polling and finish this async Task.
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Blocks until condition is true or task is canceled.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="ct">
    ///     Cancellation token.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="condition">
    ///     The condition that will perpetuate the block.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pollDelay">
    ///     The delay at which the condition will be polled, in milliseconds.
    /// </param>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <see cref="Task" />.
    /// </returns>
    public static async Task WaitUntilAsync(CancellationToken ct, Func<bool> condition, int pollDelay = 25)
    {
        try
        {
            while (!condition())
            {
                await Task.Delay(pollDelay, ct).ConfigureAwait(true);
            }
        }
        catch (TaskCanceledException)
        {
            // ignore: Task.Delay throws this exception when ct.IsCancellationRequested = true
            // In this case, we only want to stop polling and finish this async Task.
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Blocks while condition is true or timeout occurs.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="ct">
    ///     The cancellation token.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="condition">
    ///     The condition that will perpetuate the block.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pollDelay">
    ///     The delay at which the condition will be polled, in milliseconds.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="timeout">
    ///     Timeout in milliseconds.
    /// </param>
    /// <exception cref="TimeoutException">
    ///     Thrown after timeout milliseconds
    /// </exception>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <see cref="Task" />.
    /// </returns>
    public static async Task WaitWhileAsync(CancellationToken ct, Func<bool> condition, int pollDelay, int timeout)
    {
        if (ct.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            return;
        }

        using (CancellationTokenSource cts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(ct))
        {
            Task waitTask     = WaitWhileAsync(cts.Token, condition, pollDelay);
            Task timeoutTask  = Task.Delay(timeout, cts.Token);
            Task finishedTask = await Task.WhenAny(waitTask, timeoutTask).ConfigureAwait(true);

            if (!ct.IsCancellationRequested)
            {
                cts.Cancel();                            // Cancel unfinished task
                await finishedTask.ConfigureAwait(true); // Propagate exceptions
                if (finishedTask == timeoutTask)
                {
                    throw new TimeoutException();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Blocks until condition is true or timeout occurs.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="ct">
    ///     Cancellation token
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="condition">
    ///     The condition that will perpetuate the block.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="pollDelay">
    ///     The delay at which the condition will be polled, in milliseconds.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="timeout">
    ///     Timeout in milliseconds.
    /// </param>
    /// <exception cref="TimeoutException">
    ///     Thrown after timeout milliseconds
    /// </exception>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <see cref="Task" />.
    /// </returns>
    public static async Task WaitUntilAsync(CancellationToken ct, Func<bool> condition, int pollDelay, int timeout)
    {
        if (ct.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            return;
        }

        using (CancellationTokenSource cts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(ct))
        {
            Task waitTask     = WaitUntilAsync(cts.Token, condition, pollDelay);
            Task timeoutTask  = Task.Delay(timeout, cts.Token);
            Task finishedTask = await Task.WhenAny(waitTask, timeoutTask).ConfigureAwait(true);

            if (!ct.IsCancellationRequested)
            {
                cts.Cancel();                            // Cancel unfinished task
                await finishedTask.ConfigureAwait(true); // Propagate exceptions
                if (finishedTask == timeoutTask)
                {
                    throw new TimeoutException();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Wondering about ConfigureAwait(true) usage. devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/configureawait-faq, "Why would I want to use ConfigureAwait(true)? You wouldn’t, unless you were using it purely as an indication that you were purposefully not using ConfigureAwait(false) (e.g. to silence static analysis warnings or the like). ConfigureAwait(true) does nothing meaningful. When comparing await task with await task.ConfigureAwait(true), they’re functionally identical. If you see ConfigureAwait(true) in production code, you can delete it without ill effect."
    – 6footunder
    Jan 23 at 19:52
  • 1
    Exactly, as you guessed: it is purely an indication to show my intent of "keeping the same execution thread and context". Also, there might be some developers who set ConfigureAwait to implicitly behave as it was set to false as default. That's why I wanted to be explicit but I totally agree with you that you may want to delete this in most cases. Jan 25 at 13:33
4

Try this

async void Function()
{
    while (condition) 
    {
        await Task.Delay(1);
    }
}

This will make the program wait until the condition is not true. You can just invert it by adding a "!" infront of the condition so that it will wait until the condition is true.

3

you can use SpinUntil which is buildin in the .net-framework. Please note: This method causes high cpu-workload.

1
  • While it's true that SpinUntil is a direct replacement for the while loop, it is nothing more than a direct replacement for the while loop. While it is waiting, it is holding on to the thread and it is keeping the CPU busy. Async programming was intended to avoid both of those things. A slightly more elegant solution would still block the thread but would use no CPU cycles until the condition is satisfied. A much more elegant solution would release the thread until the condition is satisfied. See the other answers on this page for examples.
    – NSFW
    Jul 6, 2019 at 19:00
0

After digging a lot of stuff, finally, I came up with a good solution that doesn't hang the CI :) Suit it to your needs!

public static Task WaitUntil<T>(T elem, Func<T, bool> predicate, int seconds = 10)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
    using(var cancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(seconds)))
    {
        cancellationTokenSource.Token.Register(() =>
        {
            tcs.SetException(
                new TimeoutException($"Waiting predicate {predicate} for {elem.GetType()} timed out!"));
            tcs.TrySetCanceled();
        });

        while(!cancellationTokenSource.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            try
            {
                if (!predicate(elem))
                {
                    continue;
                }
            }
            catch(Exception e)
            {
                tcs.TrySetException(e);
            }

            tcs.SetResult(0);
            break;
        }

        return tcs.Task;
    }
}
3
  • Seems like it never throws the exception.
    – ArieDov
    Feb 7, 2019 at 11:51
  • @ArieDov, it depends what you want tho. If it is foreseeable that predicate throws an exception then yes you need to catch and set as a tcs result Feb 7, 2019 at 12:04
  • This will still keep the CPU busy, just in a different thread while the original thread is free. What is won here?
    – ygoe
    Nov 15, 2019 at 18:19
-3

You can use an async result and a delegate for this. If you read up on the documentation it should make it pretty clear what to do. I can write up some sample code if you like and attach it to this answer.

Action isExcelInteractive = IsExcelInteractive;

private async void btnOk_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    IAsyncResult result = isExcelInteractive.BeginInvoke(ItIsDone, null);
    result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne();
    Console.WriteLine("YAY");
} 

static void IsExcelInteractive(){
   while (something_is_false) // do your check here
   {
       if(something_is_true)
          return true;
   }
   Thread.Sleep(1);
}

void ItIsDone(IAsyncResult result)
{
   this.isExcelInteractive.EndInvoke(result);
}

Apologies if this code isn't 100% complete, I don't have Visual Studio on this computer, but hopefully it gets you where you need to get to.

1
  • 1
    Please do, that will help me understand quicker :)
    – Keylee
    Mar 17, 2015 at 0:53

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