81

I am creating a Map from a List as follows:

List<String> strings = Arrays.asList("a", "bb", "ccc");

Map<String, Integer> map = strings.stream()
    .collect(Collectors.toMap(Function.identity(), String::length));

I want to keep the same iteration order as was in the List. How can I create a LinkedHashMap using the Collectors.toMap() methods?

  • 1
    please check my answer below. It is only 4 lines of code using a custom Supplier, Accumulator and Combiner for the collect method of your stream :) – hzitoun Mar 25 '19 at 9:06
  • 1
    The question has already been answered, I just want to lay out the path to finding answer to this question.(1) You want order in map, you have to use LinkedHashMap (2) Collectors.toMap() has many implementations, one of which asks for a Map. So use a LinkedHashMap where it expects Map. – Satyendra Kumar Jun 5 '19 at 12:13
112

The 2-parameter version of Collectors.toMap() uses a HashMap:

public static <T, K, U> Collector<T, ?, Map<K,U>> toMap(
    Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper, 
    Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper) 
{
    return toMap(keyMapper, valueMapper, throwingMerger(), HashMap::new);
}

To use the 4-parameter version, you can replace:

Collectors.toMap(Function.identity(), String::length)

with:

Collectors.toMap(
    Function.identity(), 
    String::length, 
    (u, v) -> {
        throw new IllegalStateException(String.format("Duplicate key %s", u));
    }, 
    LinkedHashMap::new
)

Or to make it a bit cleaner, write a new toLinkedMap() method and use that:

public class MoreCollectors
{
    public static <T, K, U> Collector<T, ?, Map<K,U>> toLinkedMap(
        Function<? super T, ? extends K> keyMapper,
        Function<? super T, ? extends U> valueMapper)
    {
        return Collectors.toMap(
            keyMapper,
            valueMapper, 
            (u, v) -> {
                throw new IllegalStateException(String.format("Duplicate key %s", u));
            },
            LinkedHashMap::new
        );
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Why such complexity? you can easily do that, check my answer below – hzitoun Jan 14 '19 at 13:04
  • 1
    mergeFunction that in 4-parameter version Collectors.toMap() has no clue about which key is being merged, both u and v are the values. So the message about IllegalStateException is not that right. – MoonFruit Aug 5 '19 at 9:21
  • 1
    @hzitoun because if you simply use Map::put, you end up with (possibly) different values for the same key. By using Map::put, you indirectly chose that the first value you come across is incorrect. Is that what the end-user wants? Are you sure? If yes, then sure, use Map::put. Otherwise, you aren't sure and can't decide: let the user know that their stream mapped to two identical keys with different values. I would have commented on your own answer, but it's currently locked. – Olivier Grégoire Dec 27 '19 at 14:57
66

Provide your own Supplier, Accumulator and Combiner:

List<String> myList = Arrays.asList("a", "bb", "ccc"); 
// or since java 9 List.of("a", "bb", "ccc");

LinkedHashMap<String, Integer> mapInOrder = myList
    .stream()
    .collect(
        LinkedHashMap::new,                                   // Supplier
        (map, item) -> map.put(item, item.length()),          // Accumulator
        Map::putAll);                                         // Combiner

System.out.println(mapInOrder);  // {a=1, bb=2, ccc=3}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @Sushil Accepted answer allows to reuse logic – cylinder.y May 14 '19 at 11:38
  • 1
    The stream relies on the side-effects such as map.put(..) which is wrong. – Nikolas Nov 28 '19 at 14:39
  • Do you know what is faster? Using your version or the accepted answer? – nimo23 Apr 28 at 17:49
  • @Nikolas can you please explain what you mean with side effects? I actually have the problem to decide which one to choose: stackoverflow.com/questions/61479650/… – nimo23 Apr 28 at 17:54
0

In Kotlin, toMap() is order-preserving.

fun <K, V> Iterable<Pair<K, V>>.toMap(): Map<K, V>

Returns a new map containing all key-value pairs from the given collection of pairs.

The returned map preserves the entry iteration order of the original collection. If any of two pairs would have the same key the last one gets added to the map.

Here's its implementation:

public fun <K, V> Iterable<Pair<K, V>>.toMap(): Map<K, V> {
    if (this is Collection) {
        return when (size) {
            0 -> emptyMap()
            1 -> mapOf(if (this is List) this[0] else iterator().next())
            else -> toMap(LinkedHashMap<K, V>(mapCapacity(size)))
        }
    }
    return toMap(LinkedHashMap<K, V>()).optimizeReadOnlyMap()
}

The usage is simply:

val strings = listOf("a", "bb", "ccc")
val map = strings.map { it to it.length }.toMap()

The underlying collection for map is a LinkedHashMap (which is insertion-ordered).

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