1

There are two queries:

1.

BEGIN;
SELECT * FROM "Users"
WHERE "Users"."Name" = 'user0'
FOR UPDATE NOWAIT ;

select pg_sleep(30);

END;

2.

BEGIN;
UPDATE "Users"
SET "Respect" = 2
WHERE "Users"."Name" = 'user0';
END;

As I use NOWAIT I expect that the second query will return error but it doesn't work for me. The second query just hangs and waits for the first one. What did I miss? I tried on 9.2-9.4 Postgres.

1
  • 2
    Offcourse, the NOWAIT is for your 1st transaction, not the second one. You're using NOWAIT in the wrong transaction. Mar 17 '15 at 15:44
3

NOWAIT affects the statement it's in. It doesn't affect other statements that want to wait rather than reporting an error.

To have your second query immediately raise an error if it can't lock rows, you'll need to rewrite it to use select ... for update nowait, then update.... The update statement alone doesn't have a nowait option.

BEGIN transaction;
select "Respect" from "Users" where "Name" = 'user0' for update nowait;

UPDATE "Users"
SET "Respect" = 2
WHERE "Users"."Name" = 'user0';
END;
2
  • But..is there a way to get a row to be locked for my case. I mean the case when the first one transaction do lock on row and 2st transaction tries to update the same row and gets an error? Mar 17 '15 at 16:01
  • That's what my answer does. If your first query locks a row my answer needs, my answer will raise an error immediately. It won't wait for other transactions to release their locks. You can test this by running psql in two terminal windows (for example). Mar 17 '15 at 17:39

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