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Does anyone know how this works?

When I declare a Promise in a typescript angularjs class like this:

constructor() {
var promise = customService.getObjects();

promise.then(
$scope.successCallback,
$scope.errorCallback);

$scope.successCallback = () => {}
$scope.errorCallback= () => {}
}

...these callbacks won't run when the promise resolves. When I declare them first and then run the promise, then the callbacks work fine. like this:

constructor() {

$scope.successCallback = () => {}
$scope.errorCallback= () => {}

var promise = customService.getObjects();

promise.then(
$scope.successCallback,
$scope.errorCallback);

}

Is this some tricky javascript/typescript thing? It seems quite illogical to me.

1
  • In the first case you are passing to the promise a "reference x", and after you change this reference to "anonimous function", but the original reference was lost, and is undefined in the promise. You can declare a naming function instead and the reference is not lost. – Jesús Quintana Mar 18 '15 at 9:30
3

That's because you're just passing 'undefined' into .then() in the first case. Do the functions need to be attached to $scope? Can you just make an anonymous function than are defined inside then()? Or you could make these functions themselves call the ones which are attached to $scope and not yet defined.

6
  • Well, I chose this above anonymous functions, because I reuse the same callbacks multiple times. – user3310530 Mar 18 '15 at 9:06
  • And connected them to $scope, because I'm handling scoped variables within them. (or is that unnecessary?) – user3310530 Mar 18 '15 at 9:07
  • I guess my question is: why the **** are they undefined when I define them just below. :) – user3310530 Mar 18 '15 at 9:10
  • The only reason you would attach a function to $scope is if it needed to be attached to an ng-click or something similar. If not you should just define it normally. You can access the variables as usual inside your callback, like $scope.var. – liamness Mar 18 '15 at 13:42
  • They're undefined because you passed variables to a function before initialising them. Therefore the reference that would've been passed didn't exist yet. Broadly speaking, Javascript and most other languages run from top to bottom. – liamness Mar 18 '15 at 13:46

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