1

Having trouble coming up with code doing this.

So for example here is my string. var str = "Hello how are you today?";

How would I manipulate this string to return the position of the first letter of each word using a loop?

1

this will give you the result with less complicated code and a single loop

function foo(str) {
  var pos = [];
  var words = str.split(' ');
  pos.push(1);
  var prevWordPos;
  for (var i = 1; i < words.length; i++) {
    prevWordPos = pos[i - 1] + words[i - 1].length;
    pos.push((str.indexOf(words[i], prevWordPos) + 1));
  }
  return pos;
}

  • EDITED for better readability of the code. Thanks @Anders Anderson – Avishek Mar 19 '15 at 7:44
0

You should search for a question before asking it in case it's already been asked and answered. Get first letter of each word in a string, in Javascript

  • 1
    The OP wants the position of the letters, not to concatenate them. – RobG Mar 19 '15 at 7:06
  • Yup. looking for how to find position of the first letter of each word. – draikonz Mar 19 '15 at 7:13
0

You can use a regexp replace passing a function instead of a replacement string, this will call the function for each match:

str.replace(/[^ ]+/g, function(match, pos) {
    console.log("Word " + match + " starts at position " + pos);
});

The regexp meaning is:

  • [^ ]: anything excluding space
  • +: one or more times
  • "g" option: not only first match, but each of them

in other words the function will be called with sequences of non-spaces. Of course you can define what you consider a "word" differently.

  • I don't really understand this line of code too well. in str.replace(/[^ ] +/g. I understand the '+' concatenates and the '/g' is to search globally in the string. what does [^ ] do? and also, is there more code in here that is supposed to return the position of the first letter in each word? – draikonz Mar 19 '15 at 7:18
  • @draikonz: see edit – 6502 Mar 19 '15 at 7:25
0

Here is a Solution with two Loops, i hope that is close enough ;)

var starts = [];
var str = "How are you doing today?";
//var count = 0;
var orgStr = str;
while (str.indexOf(" ") > 0) {
    if (starts.length > 0) {       
        starts.push(starts[starts.length - 1] + str.indexOf(" ") +1);
    } else {
        starts.push(1);
        starts.push(str.indexOf(" ") +2);
        //alert(str);
    }
    str = str.substring(str.indexOf(" ") + 1);
}
for (var i = 0; i < starts.length; i++) {
    alert(starts[i] + ": " + orgStr.substring(starts[i]-1,starts[i]))
}

  • 1
    Thank you so much! After trying to think about this for hours, this helped tremendously. It's amazing how reading the code is so much easier than writing it. Hopefully, I can keep practicing it and come up with it easier and easier! – draikonz Mar 19 '15 at 7:29
  • You're welcome. You should definately take a look at the answer by @Avishek. It's way more beautiful than mine, eventhough i think it's harde to read :D – Anders Anderson Mar 19 '15 at 7:38
0

Easiest would be to search a regular expression \b\w and collect match.start() match.index for each match. Loop while there's matches.

EDIT: wrong language. lol.

  • from time–to–time should probably be seen as 4 words, not two. Up to the OP to decide what represents a word boundary I suppose. ;-). – RobG Mar 19 '15 at 7:11
  • @RobG: True. You can get to other definitions of "word" by using appropriate lookbehind assertions instead of "word boundary". – Amadan Mar 19 '15 at 8:01

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