I know that (a handful of) non-JavaScript users are out there and I'd like to cater for them instead of giving them poorer experience just because of their preference (be that for privacy reasons or whatever).

Most lazy-loading JS libraries seem to address this in the same fashion, for example see lazysizes:

<style>
    .no-js img.lazyload {
        display: none;
    }
</style>

<noscript>
    <img src="image.jpg" />
</noscript>
<img src="grey.jpg" data-src="image.jpg" class="lazyload" />

Mainly out of curiosity, I got to wondering if it would be possible to pull the fallback out of the <noscript> tag and add it to the DOM programmatically with JavaScript so that the image source didn't have to be duplicated in two image tags which would leave me with just:

<noscript>
    <img src="image.jpg" class="lazyload" width="600" height="400"/>
</noscript>

Here's what I've knocked together:

(function(attribute) {
    Array.prototype.forEach.call(document.getElementsByTagName("noscript"), function(node) {
        var parser = new DOMParser,
            el = parser.parseFromString(node.textContent, "text/xml").documentElement, // XML => <img/> required
            img = ("img" == el.tagName) ? el : el.getElementsByTagName("img")[0]; // allow for <img/> in <picture>

        img.setAttribute(attribute, img.getAttribute("src"));
        img.setAttribute("src", "data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAEAAAABCAYAAAAfFcSJAAAAAXNSR0IArs4c6QAAAARnQU1BAACxjwv8YQUAAAAJcEhZcwAADsQAAA7EAZUrDhsAAAANSURBVBhXYzh8+PB/AAffA0nNPuCLAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC");

        node.insertAdjacentHTML("beforebegin", el.outerHTML);
    });
})("data-src"); // different libraries use different data attribute names

This appears to work everywhere (Chrome, Safari, Opera, Firefox) except Internet Explorer (naturally). I know that .textContent isn't available pre-IE9 but IE9+ all seem to be failing at the final hurdle - the .outerHTML. Am I doomed to failure and having to repeat myself in my markup?

Update: To clarify, I'd ideally like to be able to use arbitrary attributes (alt, title, etc.) in the image tag or even use responsive markup:

<noscript>
    <picture>
        <source ... />
        <source ... />
        <img src="image.jpg" />
    </picture>
</noscript>
  • Is point of lazyload to reserve space for the image so that the page layout is well-defined before the image is actually loaded? I don't see any width or height attribute in your image inside the <noscript> tag ... is that intentional? – dave Mar 19 '15 at 13:13
  • @dave: the first <noscript> is taken verbatim from lazysizes page and the second is mine but I don't think it matters. This would mainly be for images below the fold so repainting / layout shouldn't be a problem. – Nev Stokes Mar 19 '15 at 13:27
  • 1
    As far as I remember, stock browser in Android 2.3 removes all <noscript> tags from DOM, and IE8 makes them empty in DOM (see smashingmagazine.com/2015/02/03/…). So, your way works in modern browsers only. – Denis Ryabov Mar 20 '15 at 10:34
  • 1
    And this way was known many years ago, e.g. see 24ways.org/2011/adaptive-images-for-responsive-designs-again – Denis Ryabov Mar 20 '15 at 10:35
  • Thanks @DenisRyabov — somehow I hadn't found that article when searching on this! – Nev Stokes Mar 20 '15 at 13:14

I'm the creator of lazySizes. This approach has multiple porblems:

  1. A noscript element is never renderend, which means it is not detectable, wether it is visible or not (or better said it is always invisible)
  2. You can't use statefull classes lazyloading and lazyload to give feedback to the user
  3. You can't pre-occupy the space for your lazy embed content (which is important for both a) user experience (no content jumping) and b) performance (no reflow)
  4. (It has problems in older browsers)
  5. The data-sizes="auto" feature can't be used

However if 4. and 5. isn't a problem for you, it is possible to use a noscript child element in conjunction with a lazyload parent to achieve this.

The markup could look something like this:

<div class="lazyload" data-noscript="">
    <noscript>
        <p>any kind of content you want to be unveiled</p>
    </noscript>
</div>

And the lazySizes plugin code would look something like this:

(function(){
    'use strict';

    var supportPicture = !!window.HTMLPictureElement;

    addEventListener('lazybeforeunveil', function(e){
        if(e.defaultPrevented || e.target.getAttribute('data-noscript') == null){return;}
        var imgs, i;
        var noScript = e.target.getElementsByTagName('noscript')[0] || {};
        var content = noScript.textContent || noScript.innerText || '';
        e.target.innerHTML = content;

        if(supportPicture){return;}

        imgs = e.target.querySelectorAll('img[srcset], picture > img');

        for(i = 0; i < imgs.length; i++){
            lazySizes.uP(imgs[i]);
        }
    });
})();

In case you like this, I might make an official plugin for this. Here is the plugin: https://github.com/aFarkas/lazysizes/tree/master/plugins/noscript

Here's how I'd do it, using methods that should be available in all browsers

(function(attribute) {
    Array.prototype.forEach.call(document.getElementsByTagName("noscript"), function(node) {
        var content = node.childNodes[0].nodeValue,
            parser  = new DOMParser(),
            doc     = parser.parseFromString(content, "text/html"),
            images  = doc.getElementsByTagName('img');

        for (var i=images.length; i--;) {
            var img    = document.createElement('img');
            img.src    = 'data:image/png;base64,iVBOR ....';
            img.height = images[i].getAttribute('height');
            img.width  = images[i].getAttribute('width');
            img.setAttribute(attribute, images[i].getAttribute('src'));
            node.parentNode.insertBefore(img, node.nextSibling);
        }
    });
})("data-src");
  • Thanks. IE (9 at least) seems to choke on "text/html" mimetype for the DOMParser which is why I was using "text/xml". +1 for a solution to the question as posed but I'd also like to be able to use arbitrary markup or attributes within the <noscript> tag or use <picture> tags - I'll update my question, sorry. – Nev Stokes Mar 19 '15 at 13:25
  • 1
    Use whatever you want, but you still have to write code that relates to whatever markup you choose to use, and I can't think of a way to magically get any markup, I had to write something that works with what you posted – adeneo Mar 19 '15 at 14:18

Here's the trick I use:

(function() {
  "use strict";
  var config = {
    // If the image gets within 50px in the Y axis, start the download.
    rootMargin: "50px 0px",
    threshold: 0.01
  };
  var observer;
  //If we're using a browser without the IntersectionObserver (IE11, Safari 11), skip the lazy part and just load the resources
  if ("IntersectionObserver" in window) {observer = new IntersectionObserver(onIntersection, config);}
  //If we're using a browser without requestAnimationFrame (IE9, Opera Mini), just run the passed function
  var rAF;
  if ("requestAnimationFrame" in window) rAF = window.requestAnimationFrame;
  else rAF = function(func) { func(); };
  var tempImg = "data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAP///wAAACH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==";
  /**
   * Temporarily replace a expensive resource load with a cheap one
   */
  function storeSourceForLater(lazyItem, tempData) {
    //Store our ACTUAL source for later
    lazyItem.setAttribute("data-lazy-src", lazyItem.getAttribute("src"));
    //Set the item to point to a temporary replacement (like a data URI)
    lazyItem.setAttribute("src", tempData);
    //Now observe the item so that we can start loading when it gets close to the viewport
    observer.observe(lazyItem);
  }
  /**
   * Temporarily prevent expensive resource loading by inserting a <source> tag pointing to a cheap one (like a data URI)
   */
  function jamSourceLoading(lazyItem, tempData) {
    var newSource = document.createElement("source");
    newSource.setAttribute("srcset", tempData);
    newSource.setAttribute("data-lazy-remove", "true");
    //adding this source tag at the start of the picture tag means the browser will load it first
    lazyItem.insertBefore(newSource, lazyItem.firstChild);
    var baseImage = lazyItem.getElementsByTagName("img")[0];
    if (baseImage) {
      //this is a picture tag, so we need to watch the image (as the picture tag is smaller than the image usually)
      observer.observe(baseImage);
    }
  }
  /**
   * Set up the lazy items so that they won't try to load when we add them to the document, but will once the user is close to seeing them
   */
  function prepareLazyContents(lazyArea) {
    var lazyImgs = lazyArea.getElementsByTagName("img");
    for(var i = lazyImgs.length; i--;){
      storeSourceForLater(lazyImgs[i], tempImg);
    }
    var lazyPictures = lazyArea.getElementsByTagName("picture");
    for(var i3 = lazyPictures.length; i3--;) {
      jamSourceLoading(lazyPictures[i3], tempImg);
    }
  }
  /**
   * Put the source back where we found it - now that the element is attached to the document, it will load now
   */
  function restoreSource(lazyItem) {
    lazyItem.setAttribute("src", lazyItem.getAttribute("data-lazy-src"));
    lazyItem.removeAttribute("data-lazy-src");
  }
  /**
   * Remove the source tag preventing the loading of picture/audio/video
   */
  function removeJammingSource(lazyItem) {
    var jammingSource = lazyItem.querySelector("source[data-lazy-remove]");
    if (jammingSource) lazyItem.removeChild(jammingSource);
  }
  /**
   * Handle the intersection postback
   */
  function onIntersection(entries, obsvr) {
    entries.forEach(function(entry) {
      if(entry.intersectionRatio === 0) return;
      //if the item is now visible, load it and stop watching it
      var lazyItem = entry.target;
      obsvr.unobserve(lazyItem);
      //Just in case the img is the decendent of a picture element, check for source tags
      removeJammingSource(lazyItem.parentNode);
      restoreSource(lazyItem);
    });
  }
  /**
   * Retrieve the elements from the 'lazy load' no script tags and prepare them for display
   */
  function setUp() {
    //Get all the noscript tags on the page
    var lazyLoadAreas = document.getElementsByTagName("noscript");
    for(var i = lazyLoadAreas.length; i--;) {
      var noScriptTag = lazyLoadAreas[i];
      //only process the ones marked for lazy loading
      if (!noScriptTag.hasAttribute("data-lazy-load")) continue;
      // The contents of a noscript tag are treated as text to JavaScript
      var lazyAreaHtml = noScriptTag.textContent||noScriptTag.innerHTML;
      // So we stick them in the innerHTML of a new div tag to 'load' them
      var lazyArea = document.createElement("div");
      lazyArea.innerHTML = lazyAreaHtml;
      //Only delay loading if we can use the IntersectionObserver to check for visibility
      if(!observer) {
        noScriptTag.parentNode.replaceChild(lazyArea, noScriptTag);
      } else {
        prepareLazyContents(lazyArea);
        noScriptTag.parentNode.replaceChild(lazyArea, noScriptTag);
      }
    }
  }
  //If the page has loaded already, run setup - if it hasn't, run as soon as it has.
  //Use requestAnimationFrame as this will propably cause repaints
  if (/comp|inter/.test(document.readyState)) {
    rAF(setUp);
  } else if ("addEventListener" in document) {
    document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded",
      function(){rAF(setUp);});
  } else {
    document.attachEvent("onreadystatechange", function() {
      if (document.readyState=="complete") {
        setUp();
      }
    });
  }
})();
<p>Scroll down to see lazy loading in action!</p>
<noscript><p>Even with JavaScript turned off, the images should still load.</p></noscript>
<p>Why are the assets in noscript tags? So that they will load for people who have turned JavaScript off!</p>
<p>(The conditional comments are becuase there is no way to fetch the contents of a noscript tag in IE8 and below.)</p>
<hr/>
<div style="height: 600px;"></div>
<hr/>
<!--[if (gt IE 8)|!(IE)]><!--><noscript data-lazy-load><!--<![endif]-->
  <img src="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/F-16_Plan_Black_on_Circle_Light_Blue.svg?c=25" alt="This is an image used to demonstrate a lazy-loading trick." width="250" height="250">
  Here is some text on the outside to demonstrate the lack of reflows!
<!--[if (gt IE 8)|!(IE)]><!--></noscript><!--<![endif]-->
<hr/>
<!--[if (gt IE 8)|!(IE)]><!--><noscript data-lazy-load><!--<![endif]-->
  <picture>
    <img src="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/F-16_Plan_Black_on_Circle_Light_Blue.svg?c=25" alt="This is an image used to demonstrate a lazy-loading trick." width="250" height="250">
  </picture>
  This one is a reponsive picture element!
<!--[if (gt IE 8)|!(IE)]><!--></noscript><!--<![endif]-->

It only Lazy-Loads on browser that support Intersection Observer (so not IE, but about 87% of the world at time of writing) but the image will show in all browsers.

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