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I am interested in implementing an architecture that has two databases one for read operations and the other for writes. I have never implemented something like this and have always built single database, highly normalised systems so I am not quite sure where to begin. I have a few parts to this question.

1. What would be a good resource to find out more about this architecture?
2. Is it just a question of replicating between two identical schemas, or would your schemas differ depending on the operations, would normalisation vary too?
3. How do you insure that data written to one database is immediately available for reading from the second?


Any further help, tips, resources would be appreciated. Thanks.

EDIT
After some research I have found this article which I found very informative for those interested..

http://www.codefutures.com/database-sharding/

I found this highscalability article very informative

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  • I'm very curious as to why. Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting this is a bad idea, but I've never heard of such a design pattern, and I'm very curious as to why this would be a good pattern to implement. (Of course, I realize this may be a common design pattern that I've just never ran across before.)
    – David
    May 26, 2010 at 16:05
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    Are you thinking more like one database for normal usage, and one that's read-only for reporting purposes? Because that's a more common scenario. Having a database for write-only access has almost no viable use cases.
    – Agent_9191
    May 26, 2010 at 16:07
  • If the databases are synchronized, I'm not sure how they are separate databases. You may want to read about something like file system journaling.
    – WhirlWind
    May 26, 2010 at 16:08
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    @David @Agent @WhirlWind I think that the read/write master and read-only slaves databases pattern is more common than you think. May 26, 2010 at 17:03
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    @David Stratton @Agent_9191 @WhirlWind @Pascal Thivent ~ I think he intends to do something like Command Query Separation ~ Is this right @Matt ? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command-query_separation
    – jcolebrand
    May 26, 2010 at 17:07

3 Answers 3

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I'm not a specialist but the read/write master database and read-only slaves pattern is a "common" pattern, especially for big applications doing mostly read accesses or data warehouses:

  • it allows to scale (you add more read-only slaves if required)
  • it allows to tune the databases differently (for either efficient reads or efficient writes)

What would be a good resource to find out more about this architecture?

There are good resources available on the Internet. For example:

Is it just a question of replicating between two identical schemas, or would your schemas differ depending on the operations, would normalisation vary too?

I'm not sure - I'm eager to read answers from experts - but I think the schemas are identical in traditional replication scenari (the tuning may be different though). Maybe people are doing more exotic things but I wonder if they rely on database replication in that case, it sounds more like "real-time ETL".

How do you insure that data written to one database is immediately available for reading from the second?

I guess you would need synchronous replication for that (which is of course slower than asynchronous). While some databases do support this mode, not all do AFAIK. But have a look at this answer or this one for SQL Server.

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  • @Pascal Thivent ~ Wouldn't this be en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command-query_separation
    – jcolebrand
    May 26, 2010 at 17:08
  • @drachenstern: I'm not sure CQS implies anything about the way you store data. But thanks, it's a very interesting link. May 26, 2010 at 17:25
  • @Pascal Thivent ~ I was thinking more about the reference of having a pub/sub sync arch between the two. I was also thinking that article had images when I blind linked to it: udidahan.com/2008/08/11/command-query-separation-and-soa
    – jcolebrand
    May 26, 2010 at 17:30
  • @drachenstern: Ah, yes, didn't check that link and I'm going to read that. Thanks again. May 26, 2010 at 18:33
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    @drachenstern: I went through the second link and I see the "relation" but think that there is no equivalence (you can do CQS with a single database, CQS is IMHO more a pure OOP principle). Interesting read though. May 26, 2010 at 22:20
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You might look up data warehouses. These serve as 'normalized for reporting' type databases, while you can keep a normalized OLTP style instance for the data maintenance.

I don't think the idea of 'immediate' equivalence will be a reality. There will be some delay while the new data and changes are migrated in to the other system. The schedule and scope will be your big decisions here.

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    +1. Matt - look up OLTP and OLAP. Use one database to support fast transactional work (such as to support an app), and ETL data as required to a another database built to be reported off. As they are separate you don't get performance hits on one affecting the other. Moving data between the databases is a complex issue on it's own - depending on how much data there is to move, and how often; when people say they want "real-time" replication between sources what do they actually mean (you need to verify) because real-time to a computer is much faster than 'real-time' to a human.
    – Adrian K
    May 27, 2010 at 8:06
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In regards to questions 2:

It really depends on what you are trying to achieve by having two databases. If it is for performance reasons (which i suspect it may be) i would suggest you look into denormalizing the read-only database as needed for performance. If performance isn't an issue then I wouldn't mess with the read-only schema.

I've worked on similar systems where there would be a read/write database that was only lightly used by administrative users. That database would then be replicated to the read only database during a nightly process.

Question 3: How immediate are we talking here? Less than a second? 10 seconds? Minutes?

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