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I'm doing some MYSQL work for a company, and I need to know if they have an ENTERPRISE or COMMUNITY edition. I researched this, and according to the mysql reference pages, I should be able to use the "status" command. According to that reference, the "Server Version" should say "Community", or "enterprise". Ours says neither (figures, right?), just "5.0.77 Source Distribution". Is there another way to tell?

  • Have you tried asking them? – Jonast92 Mar 19 '15 at 14:38
  • them them you refer to are long gone (the ones who created the server). The only people left aren't mysql- or OS-savvy.. – user3250422 Mar 19 '15 at 14:39
  • 2
    Why does this matter? The versions are exactly the same. The additional things enterprise have are support related. – thepratt Mar 19 '15 at 14:50
  • Now I feel like I'm the one doing the research. – Strawberry Mar 19 '15 at 15:29
  • Boy the saltiness in these comments! :/ This was 4 years ago, I hope people reviewed the community guidelines since then. ^_^ – msb Apr 25 at 18:06
6

tl;dr

Try this:

mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE "%version%";

Normal answer

Using a command client (mysql), the server version of the MySQL server to which you are connected is shown once you are connected. The server version information includes community or enterprise accordingly.

For example, here is the output from a MySQL Community Server edition installed on Linux:

Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 6
Server version: 5.0.27-standard MySQL Community Edition - Standard (GPL)

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the buffer.

mysql>

This is an example of the output from MySQL Enterprise Server on Windows:

Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 2
Server version: 5.0.28-enterprise-gpl-nt MySQL Enterprise Server (GPL)

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the buffer.

You may also determine the version information using the version variables. Both the version and version_comment variables contain version information for the server to which you are connected. Use the SHOW VARIABLES statement to obtain the information you want, as shown in this example:

mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE "%version%";
+-------------------------+------------------------------------------+
| Variable_name           | Value                                    |
+-------------------------+------------------------------------------+
| protocol_version        | 10                                       |
| version                 | 5.0.27-standard                          |
| version_comment         | MySQL Community Edition - Standard (GPL) |
| version_compile_machine | i686                                     |
| version_compile_os      | pc-linux-gnu                             |
+-------------------------+------------------------------------------+
5 rows in set (0.04 sec)

Straight from the documentation.

But, of course, so is STATUS;

The STATUS command displays the version as well as version comment information. For example:

mysql> STATUS;
--------------
./client/mysql  Ver 14.12 Distrib 5.0.29, for pc-linux-gnu (i686) using     readline 5.0

Connection id:          8
Current database:
Current user:           mc@localhost
SSL:                    Not in use
Current pager:          /usr/bin/less
Using outfile:          ''
Using delimiter:        ;
Server version:         5.0.27-standard MySQL Community Edition - Standard     (GPL)
Protocol version:       10
Connection:             Localhost via UNIX socket
Server characterset:    latin1
Db     characterset:    latin1
Client characterset:    latin1
Conn.  characterset:    latin1
UNIX socket:            /tmp/mysql.sock
Uptime:                 1 day 3 hours 58 min 43 sec

Threads: 2  Questions: 17  Slow queries: 0  Opens: 11  Flush tables: 1  Open     tables: 6  Queries per second avg: 0.000
--------------

So I wonder whether you're actually just looking at the first line provided or whether you're checking below for the "Server version" line.

If nothing works for you then feel free to edit your question with a complete dump of what you get.

Edit

As you found out it appears that they do not disquisition between the releases since it's a specific edition release, in this case a Community Edition. Thus the answer generally only works if you can't be certain by looking up the version.

  • so was "status", straight from the documentation (which I guess you're implying I didn't read....). and like the status command this ALSO tells me nothing version_comment = "Source distribution" – user3250422 Mar 19 '15 at 14:45
  • @user3250422 " Ours says neither (figures, right?), just "5.0.77 Source Distribution"." you need to give us the complete output to figure out what's wrong. – Jonast92 Mar 19 '15 at 14:49
  • here what I got (sorry about the formatting...)codemysql> status -------------- mysql Ver 14.12 Distrib 5.0.77, for redhat-linux-gnu (i386) using readline 5.1 Connection id: 5476 Current database: Current user: ​ @localhost SSL: Not in use Current pager: stdout Using outfile: '' Using delimiter: ; Server version: 5.0.77 Source distribution Protocol version: 10 Connection: Localhost via UNIX – user3250422 Mar 19 '15 at 14:57
  • @user3250422 It's weird, really. What happens when you try the SHOW VARIABLES LIKE "%version%"; command ? – Jonast92 Mar 19 '15 at 15:10
  • Jonas I did that - I just get a table of the same (sub set of) info in the status command, formatted differently. I did some more analysis and found on the MYSQL release notes pages, that 5.0.77 was ONLY a (2009) Community release. So although that's a heck of a strange way to have to determine ENT or COMMUNITY, I think that's closest I can get to an answer. Which is fine - I'm going to tell them I need to move these aps to another server which I KNOW is enterprise (because it has enterprise plug-ins) and decommision this relic! Thanks... – user3250422 Mar 19 '15 at 15:14

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