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This came up in coursework, and I'm stuck:

Many systems have more than one version of a utility program so that users can choose the one they want. Suggest a command to find all the versions of make on a system. What determines which one a user actually gets? How might a user override the defaults?

How would you do that?

  • What have you tried? You might like to read about the $PATH environment variable. – Anko Mar 19 '15 at 20:21
  • I have tried to use find / -name make but that didn't seem to work – Moh Mar 19 '15 at 20:23
  • find as you describe should work. You may being scanning a really giant networked file system. So try restricting what gets searched, ie find /usr -name '*[Mm][Aa][Kk][Ee]*' . With the *'s in this, you'll get extra output, but it will find thinks like gmake, cmake, cMake, etc. – shellter Mar 19 '15 at 20:35
  • Thank you for the help – Moh Mar 19 '15 at 20:47
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How UNIX finds programs

Unix-like systems store their executable programs in various directories for historical reasons.

The directories that are searched when you want to run a command are stored in an environment variable called $PATH, separated by colons (:). To see its contents, type echo "$PATH" in a terminal window. On my system, that shows (split to avoid a long line)

/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/lib/jvm/default/bin:
/usr/bin/site_perl:/usr/bin/vendor_perl:/usr/bin/core_perl

They're searched in that order. If I want to run make, the system will first check /usr/local/sbin/make (which doesn't exist), then /usr/local/bin/make (also non-existant), then /usr/bin/make (which does exist, so it runs that).

How to figure out which one would run

The program which can be used to look through $PATH to figure out what program would be chosen. Running which make on my system produces the output /usr/bin/make.

Conveniently, which has a -a flag to print all executables that match, not just the first one. (I found this by consulting its manual, by running man which.) So which -a java should tell you where all of the versions of java are.

Changing the defaults

If you like, you can change the contents of the $PATH variable, like you can change any environment variable: If I run PATH="$PATH:/home/anko/bin", the next time the system needs to find a program, it will check through all of what $PATH used to be, plus a directory called bin in my home directory if it couldn't find anything else.

I could also prepend the directory, to make it take precedence over anything else, by doing PATH="/home/anko/bin:$PATH".

  • Thank you that helped me a lot – Moh Mar 19 '15 at 20:47
  • What if the question was something like this? Many systems have more than one version of a utility program so that users can choose the one they want. Suggest a command to find all the versions @Anko ? – Moh Mar 19 '15 at 21:03
  • @Moh which -a does that, if they have the same name. If they don't have the same name, you'll have to think of some other criterion that makes them "versions" of each other. (When something is a "different version" and when it's a different thing altogether is kind of a philosophical question… :)) – Anko Mar 19 '15 at 21:35

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