23

I am currently working with some Raman Spectra data, and I am trying to correct my data caused by florescence skewing. Take a look at the graph below:

enter image description here

I am pretty close to achieving what I want. As you can see, I am trying to fit a polynomial in all my data whereas I should really just be fitting a polynomial at the local minimas.

Ideally I would want to have a polynomial fitting which when subtracted from my original data would result in something like this:

enter image description here

Are there any built in libs that does this already?

If not, any simple algorithm one can recommend for me?

2
  • You could try designing a high path filter by transforming your signal with rfft() and setting the low frequency part to zero.
    – Dietrich
    Mar 20 '15 at 20:26
  • You should look at the minimum finding techniques in this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/24656367/…. Once you have those, you can fit only to the minima to find your baseline correction.
    – Curt F.
    Mar 21 '15 at 15:55
29

I found an answer to my question, just sharing for everyone who stumbles upon this.

There is an algorithm called "Asymmetric Least Squares Smoothing" by P. Eilers and H. Boelens in 2005. The paper is free and you can find it on google.

def baseline_als(y, lam, p, niter=10):
  L = len(y)
  D = sparse.csc_matrix(np.diff(np.eye(L), 2))
  w = np.ones(L)
  for i in xrange(niter):
    W = sparse.spdiags(w, 0, L, L)
    Z = W + lam * D.dot(D.transpose())
    z = spsolve(Z, w*y)
    w = p * (y > z) + (1-p) * (y < z)
  return z
4
  • 1
    works perfectly for me. just quoting from that paper what those parameters are: <<There are two parameters: p for asymmetry and λ for smoothness. Both have to be tuned to the data at hand. We found that generally 0.001 ≤ p ≤ 0.1 is a good choice (for a signal with positive peaks) and 10^2 ≤ λ ≤ 10^9 , but exceptions may occur. In any case one should vary λ on a grid that is approximately linear for log λ>> May 30 '18 at 19:08
  • Just a quick question - basically z is the baseline? So the spectrum needs to be subtracted by that array at the end to get baseline corrected? Jun 18 '20 at 23:49
  • I cannot find the paper, can you give me the link? Thanks
    – arghhjayy
    Sep 9 '20 at 12:28
  • 1
    Couldn't find the paper myself, but this article provides a very clear explanation of AsLS and related methods. FWIW, the version they propose worked far better in my case.
    – glinka
    Apr 7 at 15:53
9

The following code works on Python 3.6.

This is adapted from the accepted correct answer to avoid the dense matrix diff computation (which can easily cause memory issues) and uses range (not xrange)

import numpy as np
from scipy import sparse
from scipy.sparse.linalg import spsolve

def baseline_als(y, lam, p, niter=10):
  L = len(y)
  D = sparse.diags([1,-2,1],[0,-1,-2], shape=(L,L-2))
  w = np.ones(L)
  for i in range(niter):
    W = sparse.spdiags(w, 0, L, L)
    Z = W + lam * D.dot(D.transpose())
    z = spsolve(Z, w*y)
    w = p * (y > z) + (1-p) * (y < z)
  return z
8

Recently, I needed to use this method. The code from answers works well, but it obviously overuses the memory. So, here is my version with optimized memory usage.

def baseline_als_optimized(y, lam, p, niter=10):
    L = len(y)
    D = sparse.diags([1,-2,1],[0,-1,-2], shape=(L,L-2))
    D = lam * D.dot(D.transpose()) # Precompute this term since it does not depend on `w`
    w = np.ones(L)
    W = sparse.spdiags(w, 0, L, L)
    for i in range(niter):
        W.setdiag(w) # Do not create a new matrix, just update diagonal values
        Z = W + D
        z = spsolve(Z, w*y)
        w = p * (y > z) + (1-p) * (y < z)
    return z

According to my benchmarks bellow, it is also about 1,5 times faster.

%%timeit -n 1000 -r 10 y = randn(1000)
baseline_als(y, 10000, 0.05) # function from @jpantina's answer
# 20.5 ms ± 382 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 10 runs, 1000 loops each)

%%timeit -n 1000 -r 10 y = randn(1000)
baseline_als_optimized(y, 10000, 0.05)
# 13.3 ms ± 874 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 10 runs, 1000 loops each)

NOTE 1: The original article says:

To emphasize the basic simplicity of the algorithm, the number of iterations has been fixed to 10. In practical applications one should check whether the weights show any change; if not, convergence has been attained.

So, it means that the more correct way to stop iteration is to check that ||w_new - w|| < tolerance

NOTE 2: Another useful quote (from @glycoaddict's comment) gives an idea how to choose values of the parameters.

There are two parameters: p for asymmetry and λ for smoothness. Both have to be tuned to the data at hand. We found that generally 0.001 ≤ p ≤ 0.1 is a good choice (for a signal with positive peaks) and 102 ≤ λ ≤ 109, but exceptions may occur. In any case one should vary λ on a grid that is approximately linear for log λ. Often visual inspection is sufficient to get good parameter values.

1
  • Would it be correct to use this method for 2D data or are there more suitable implementations? I want to remove baseline from fluorescent microscopy images. It works very well but slow. I am flattening array with ravel and then using your code to find baseline. Mar 16 '20 at 22:04
8

There is a python library available for baseline correction/removal. It has Modpoly, IModploy and Zhang fit algorithm which can return baseline corrected results when you input the original values as a python list or pandas series and specify the polynomial degree.

Install the library as pip install BaselineRemoval. Below is an example

from BaselineRemoval import BaselineRemoval

input_array=[10,20,1.5,5,2,9,99,25,47]
polynomial_degree=2 #only needed for Modpoly and IModPoly algorithm

baseObj=BaselineRemoval(input_array)
Modpoly_output=baseObj.ModPoly(polynomial_degree)
Imodpoly_output=baseObj.IModPoly(polynomial_degree)
Zhangfit_output=baseObj.ZhangFit()

print('Original input:',input_array)
print('Modpoly base corrected values:',Modpoly_output)
print('IModPoly base corrected values:',Imodpoly_output)
print('ZhangFit base corrected values:',Zhangfit_output)

Original input: [10, 20, 1.5, 5, 2, 9, 99, 25, 47]
Modpoly base corrected values: [-1.98455800e-04  1.61793368e+01  1.08455179e+00  5.21544654e+00
  7.20210508e-02  2.15427531e+00  8.44622093e+01 -4.17691125e-03
  8.75511661e+00]
IModPoly base corrected values: [-0.84912125 15.13786196 -0.11351367  3.89675187 -1.33134142  0.70220645
 82.99739548 -1.44577432  7.37269705]
ZhangFit base corrected values: [ 8.49924691e+00  1.84994576e+01 -3.31739230e-04  3.49854060e+00
  4.97412948e-01  7.49628529e+00  9.74951576e+01  2.34940300e+01
  4.54929023e+01
3
  • I tried using the BaselineRemoval library, where the input array is a dataframe column of lists but it was unable to run. Gives the error 'ValueError: setting an array element with a sequence.'
    – Sp_95
    Aug 26 '20 at 17:43
  • 2
    @Sp_95 Check 1) dimension of array, if it is one dimensional python list object or dataframe['ColumnName'].tolist() it should work. 2) If you are using the latest version of library. If you are still facing issue. create a separate question with example data and post question link here. I will be happy to look into it. Aug 27 '20 at 4:23
  • the question is posted here stackoverflow.com/questions/63634066/…
    – Sp_95
    Aug 28 '20 at 12:47
1

I know this is an old question, but I stumpled upon it a few months ago and implemented the equivalent answer using spicy.sparse routines.

# Baseline removal                                                                                            

def baseline_als(y, lam, p, niter=10):                                                                        

    s  = len(y)                                                                                               
    # assemble difference matrix                                                                              
    D0 = sparse.eye( s )                                                                                      
    d1 = [numpy.ones( s-1 ) * -2]                                                                             
    D1 = sparse.diags( d1, [-1] )                                                                             
    d2 = [ numpy.ones( s-2 ) * 1]                                                                             
    D2 = sparse.diags( d2, [-2] )                                                                             

    D  = D0 + D2 + D1                                                                                         
    w  = np.ones( s )                                                                                         
    for i in range( niter ):                                                                                  
        W = sparse.diags( [w], [0] )                                                                          
        Z =  W + lam*D.dot( D.transpose() )                                                                   
        z = spsolve( Z, w*y )                                                                                 
        w = p * (y > z) + (1-p) * (y < z)                                                                     

    return z

Cheers,

Pedro.

1

I worked the version of the algorithm referenced by glinka in a previous comment, which is an improvement of the penalized weighted linear squares method published in a relatively recent paper. I took Rustam Guliev's code to build this one:

from scipy import sparse
from scipy.sparse import linalg
import numpy as np
from numpy.linalg import norm


def baseline_arPLS(y, ratio=1e-6, lam=100, niter=10, full_output=False):
    L = len(y)

    diag = np.ones(L - 2)
    D = sparse.spdiags([diag, -2*diag, diag], [0, -1, -2], L, L - 2)

    H = lam * D.dot(D.T)  # The transposes are flipped w.r.t the Algorithm on pg. 252

    w = np.ones(L)
    W = sparse.spdiags(w, 0, L, L)

    crit = 1
    count = 0

    while crit > ratio:
        z = linalg.spsolve(W + H, W * y)
        d = y - z
        dn = d[d < 0]

        m = np.mean(dn)
        s = np.std(dn)

        w_new = 1 / (1 + np.exp(2 * (d - (2*s - m))/s))

        crit = norm(w_new - w) / norm(w)

        w = w_new
        W.setdiag(w)  # Do not create a new matrix, just update diagonal values

        count += 1

        if count > niter:
            print('Maximum number of iterations exceeded')
            break

    if full_output:
        info = {'num_iter': count, 'stop_criterion': crit}
        return z, d, info
    else:
        return z

In order to test the algorithm, I created a spectrum similar to the one shown in Fig. 3 of the paper, by first generating a simulated spectra consisting of multiple Gaussian peaks:

def spectra_model(x):
    coeff = np.array([100, 200, 100])
    mean = np.array([300, 750, 800])

    stdv = np.array([15, 30, 15])

    terms = []
    for ind in range(len(coeff)):
        term = coeff[ind] * np.exp(-((x - mean[ind]) / stdv[ind])**2)
        terms.append(term)

    spectra = sum(terms)

    return spectra

x_vals = np.arange(1, 1001)
spectra_sim = spectra_model(x_vals)

Then, I created a third-order interpolating polynomial using 4 points taken directly from the paper:

from scipy.interpolate import CubicSpline
x_poly = np.array([0, 250, 700, 1000])
y_poly = np.array([200, 180, 230, 200])

poly = CubicSpline(x_poly, y_poly)
baseline = poly(x_vals)

noise = np.random.randn(len(x_vals)) * 0.1
spectra_base = spectra_sim + baseline + noise

Finally, I used the baseline correction algorithm to subtract the baseline out of the altered spectra (spectra_base):

 _, spectra_arPLS, info = baseline_arPLS(spectra_base, lam=1e4, niter=10,
                                         full_output=True)

The results were (for reference, I compared with the pure ALS implementation by Rustam Guliev's, using lam = 1e4 and p = 0.001):

enter image description here

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.