I have a CSV file with 2 columns (A, B). I am reading it line by line and comparing the string in column A to the string in column B. My code is outputting either 0.0 or 1.0 but not a ratio as I expect. My hunch is it's because a=line[0] and b=line[1]in SequenceMatcher are not string literals but are variables instead.

import difflib

with open('compare_column_A_to_column_B.csv', 'r') as f:
  lines = [line.strip() for line in f]
  for line in lines:
    seq = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, a=line[0], b=line[1]).ratio()
    print(seq)

Why isn't a ratio being outputted?

When you read lines from f like this, you read strings. So line[0] and line[1] are just first and second characters of each line. Two characters can be equal or not equal - that's why you get only 0.0 and 1.0.

To do what you indended, use csv package from Python standard library.

import difflib
import csv

with open('compare_column_A_to_column_B.csv') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    for row in reader:
        ratio = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, a=row[0], b=row[1]).ratio()
        print(ratio)
  • Thanks for the CSV module version. Your tip about only comparing characters together was my "doh" moment. I needed to split the line into two sections first. – Jarad Mar 20 '15 at 21:30

I forgot to add line.split(","). I'm posting my solution below in case anyone is interested.

import difflib

with open('compare_column_A_to_column_B.csv', 'r') as f:
  header_line = next(f).strip()
  print(header_line)
  lines = [line.strip() for line in f]
  for line in lines:
    line = line.split(",")
    seq = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, a=line[0], b=line[1]).ratio()
    print(seq)

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