18

What is the best way of manipulating the order things are done based on some conditions (other than writing them again with the different order)?

Let's say there is a Person class and each object of Person represents a different human.

class Person{
    int eatingPriority = 3;
    int sleepingPriority = 2;
    int recreationPriority = 1;

    void eat() {/*eats*/}
    void sleep() {/*sleeps*/}
    void watchTv() {/*watches tv*/}

    void satisfyNeeds() {
        //HOW TO DO THIS
    }
}

How can I make the satisfyNeeds() methods call the other three methods based on their priority?

Note: I want to make it clear that priorities can change from Person to Person.

3
  • 2
    The easiest is to create an abstract class with 2 methods : getPriority() and run(). Then create an insance for each activity. Finally, you can put instances of those activities in a list and sort them by priority. Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 12:50
  • 2
    @ArnaudDenoyelle or use a PriorityQueue Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:44
  • I've been asked the purpose of the program. We are trying to find the cleanest way of manipulating the flow of the program. In this example let's assume that we are creating an AI for a game that has simulated people in it. If you are both hungry and tired would you sleep or eat first? If your sleeping priority is higher you sleep first, otherwise you eat before sleeping. Also it is possible to change the priorities on the fly. We can measure the sleep and food needs and set a priority based on this. Note that the code in the question is a simplified version to demonstrate the problem
    – WVrock
    Commented Mar 21, 2015 at 16:14

6 Answers 6

13

You can do this with 1 class and 1 interface.

public class Person {
    int eatingPriority = 3;
    int sleepingPriority = 2;
    int recreationPriority = 1;

    PriorityQueue<Action> actions;

    void eat() { }

    void sleep() { }

    void watchTv() { }

    public Person() {
        actions = new PriorityQueue<Action>(new Comparator<Action>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Action o1, Action o2) {
                return o2.getPriority() - o1.getPriority();
            }
        });

        actions.add(new Action() {
            @Override
            public int getPriority() {
                return eatingPriority;
            }
            @Override
            public void execute() {
                eat();
            }
        });

        actions.add(new Action() {
            @Override
            public int getPriority() {
                return sleepingPriority;
            }
            @Override
            public void execute() {
                sleep();
            }
        });

        actions.add(new Action() {
            @Override
            public int getPriority() {
                return recreationPriority;
            }
            @Override
            public void execute() {
                watchTv();
            }
        });
    }

    public void satisfyNeeds() {
        for (Action action : actions) {
            action.execute();
        }
    }

    interface Action {
        public int getPriority();
        public void execute();
    }
}
8
  • You can also keep your class structure and call your methods eat(), sleep() and watchTv() from appropriate execute() methods.
    – Maksim
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:14
  • 2
    Thanks! Nice idea, it's reasonable to use PriorityQueue here instead of ArrayList.
    – Maksim
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:29
  • Yes, sorry I removed my comment above to write a more explaining one. The advantage of PriorityQueue over ArrayList in this case would be that the sorting process is made at each adding of element, and especially "persisted". By using ArrayList, anytime you call the satisfyNeeds, you have to sort the list, could be really consuming in some use cases.
    – Mik378
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:30
  • Yes, great like that ;)
    – Mik378
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:38
  • I even would subclass the Action class to have some meaningful terms like SleepAction, and keep Open/closed Principle ;)
    – Mik378
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:40
11

Here is another possible implementation :

abstract class Need {
  abstract void satisfy();
}

class Eat extends Need {
  @Override
  public void satisfy() { /* eat ...*/}
}

class Sleep extends Need {
  @Override
  public void satisfy() { /* sleep ...*/}
}

class DrinkBeer extends Need {
  @Override
  public void satisfy() { /* drink beer ...*/}
}

class Person{
  // TreeMap will sort the map in the key's natural order (a int here)
  private Map<Integer, Need> needs = new TreeMap<>();    

 Person() {
   add(new Eat(), 3);
   add(new Sleep(), 2);
   add(new DrinkBeer(), 1);
 }

 void add(Need need, int priority) {
   needs.put(Integer.valueOf(priority), need);
 }

 void satisfyNeeds() {
    for(Need need : needs.values())
      need.satisfy();
  }
} 
1
  • needs.put(Integer.valueOf(priority), need) can be written as simply needs.put(priority, need).
    – VGR
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 20:28
10

This solution would require Java 8:

class Person {

    void eat() {};
    void sleep() {};
    void watchTv() {};

    // Being in a List you can easily reorder the needs when you want to
    List<Runnable> needs = Arrays.asList(this::eat, this::sleep);

    // Alternatively, you can use a Map<Runnable, Integer> where the value is your
    // priority and sort it (see http://stackoverflow.com/q/109383/1296402)

    void satisfyNeeds() {
        needs.forEach(Runnable::run);
    }
}
5
  • Can you elaborate? Am I supposed to write needs = Arrays.asList(() -> eat(), () -> sleep()); with the desired order whenever I want to reorder it?
    – WVrock
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 15:34
  • @WVrock You can initially define the order and later reorder it whenever it changes. Or use a Map if you have static priority values as integers (see the link). Maybe you have "presets", like final List<Runnable> needsDuringDayTime = ....; final List<Runnable> needsDuringNightTime = ... and then you set them in satisfyNeeds(): List<Runnable> needs = isDayTime() ? needsDuringDayTime : needsDuringNightTime.
    – steffen
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 16:06
  • @WVrock Or imagine you have counters or timestamps for last meals, sleep times or TV sessions and so the needs change dynamically. You'd sort the List with a custom Comparator like Collections.sort(needs, customComparator);
    – steffen
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 16:14
  • Is () -> eat() different from new Runnable() { public void run() { eat() } } or just nicer to type?
    – Random832
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 19:11
  • @Random832 It's the same. I updated my answer to make it yet a little better to read.
    – steffen
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 19:45
7

You can use this code

import java.util.Arrays;  // must be imported
int[] priorities = {sleepPriority, eatPriority, recreationPriority};
Arrays.sort(priorities);
for (int i=priorities.length-1; 0<=i; i--) {
    int priority = priorities[i];
    if (priority == sleepingPriority) { sleep(); }
    if (priority == eatingPriority) { eat(); }
    if (priority == recreationPriority) { watchTv(); }
}

Basically, it puts the priorities in an array, sorts the array and runs a for loop on it to run the functions.

8
  • requires -1 to the starting i value. Causes outOfBoundsException. int i=priorities.length -1
    – WVrock
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:31
  • Oh.. I will check it now. Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:32
  • OK I fixed it. It should work now. I added the-1 as @WVrock pointed out. Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:34
  • 1
    I've tested this and it works. I think this is the simplest solution. No extra classes or interfaces. It even uses only a single import.
    – WVrock
    Commented Mar 20, 2015 at 13:34
  • 1
    @AntonDozortsev switch case wouldn't work with the dynamic variables.
    – WVrock
    Commented Mar 21, 2015 at 16:31
5

Finding the right order of three elements can be done simply like this:

 void satisfyNeeds() {
     boolean eatFirst = eatingPriority>Math.max(sleepingPriority,recreationPriority);
     if(eatFirst) eat();
     if(sleepingPriority>recreationPriority) {
         sleep();
         watchTv();
     }
     else {
         watchTv();
         sleep();
     }
     if(!eatFirst) eat();
  }

Of course, it won’t scale if you raise the number of actions. For a higher number you might look at one of the other answers.

4

You should introduce a map property into Person class, where prioritize methods, for example:

class Person {

...
private Map<Integer, Method> methodsPriority = new HashMap<>();
...
 public Person setEatingPriority(int priority) {

  methodsPriority.put(priority, /* put 'eat' method reference here*/);
  return this;
 }

 public Person setSleepingPriority(int priority) {

  methodsPriority.put(priority, /* put 'sleep' method reference here*/);
  return this;
 }

 public Person setWatchingTVPriority(int priority) {

  methodsPriority.put(priority, /* put 'watch TV' method reference here*/);
  return this;
 }

 public void satisfyNeeds() {

  Collection<Integer> keys = methodsPriority.keySet();
  Collections.sort(keys);
  for(Integer key: keys)
   methodsPriority.get(key).invoke(this);
 }



...
}

And it can be used in next manner:

Person Anna = new Person()
.setEatingPriority(1)
.setSleepingPriority(2)
.setWatchingTVPriority(3);

Person Bob = new Person()
.setEatingPriority(3)
.setSleepingPriority(2)
.setWatchingTVPriority(1);

Anna.satisfyNeeds();
Bob.satisfyNeeds();
0

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