269

It works fine when have one or two tasks however throws an error "A task was cancelled" when we have more than one task listed.

enter image description here

List<Task> allTasks = new List<Task>();
allTasks.Add(....);
allTasks.Add(....);
Task.WaitAll(allTasks.ToArray(), configuration.CancellationToken);


private static Task<T> HttpClientSendAsync<T>(string url, object data, HttpMethod method, string contentType, CancellationToken token)
{
    HttpRequestMessage httpRequestMessage = new HttpRequestMessage(method, url);
    HttpClient httpClient = new HttpClient();
    httpClient.Timeout = new TimeSpan(Constants.TimeOut);

    if (data != null)
    {
        byte[] byteArray = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(Helper.ToJSON(data));
        MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream(byteArray);
        httpRequestMessage.Content = new StringContent(new StreamReader(memoryStream).ReadToEnd(), Encoding.UTF8, contentType);
    }

    return httpClient.SendAsync(httpRequestMessage).ContinueWith(task =>
    {
        var response = task.Result;
        return response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().ContinueWith(stringTask =>
        {
            var json = stringTask.Result;
            return Helper.FromJSON<T>(json);
        });
    }).Unwrap();
}
5

9 Answers 9

380

There's 2 likely reasons that a TaskCanceledException would be thrown:

  1. Something called Cancel() on the CancellationTokenSource associated with the cancellation token before the task completed.
  2. The request timed out, i.e. didn't complete within the timespan you specified on HttpClient.Timeout.

My guess is it was a timeout. (If it was an explicit cancellation, you probably would have figured that out.) You can be more certain by inspecting the exception:

try
{
    var response = task.Result;
}
catch (TaskCanceledException ex)
{
    // Check ex.CancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested here.
    // If false, it's pretty safe to assume it was a timeout.
}
9
  • 3
    So what is a possible solution? I have a similar issue. stackoverflow.com/questions/36937328/…
    – NoWar
    Apr 29, 2016 at 14:06
  • 66
    @Dimi - this is pretty old, but the solution I used was to set the Timeout property to a larger value: httpClient.Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30)
    – RQDQ
    Jan 23, 2017 at 14:06
  • 4
    @RQDQ, you the man, man! Not using the constructor solved the problem for me. In my specific case, I wanted a timeout in milliseconds. Using TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(Configuration.HttpTimeout) as opposed to new TimeSpan(Configuration.HttpTimeout) worked a treat. Thanks!
    – Victor Ude
    May 3, 2017 at 16:07
  • 7
    @RQDQ httpClient.Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30) isn't a good approach, because it will block that particular thread for 30 minutes and will also not hit the HTTP endpoint (which is your main task). Also, if your program finishes before 30 mins then you are most likely to encounter ThreadAbortException. A better approach would be finding out why that HTTP endpoint isn't being hit, it might require VPN or some restricted network access. Sep 28, 2018 at 7:21
  • 17
    @AmitUpadhyay If the call is awaited, then no thread is blocked. Not the UI thread, not a threadpool thread other background thread, none. Sep 29, 2018 at 12:06
30

I ran into this issue because my Main() method wasn't waiting for the task to complete before returning, so the Task<HttpResponseMessage> was being cancelled when my console program exited.

C# ≥ 7.1

You can make the main method asynchronous and await the task.

public static async Task Main(){
    Task<HttpResponseMessage> myTask = sendRequest(); // however you create the Task
    HttpResponseMessage response = await myTask;
    // process the response
}

C# < 7.1

The solution was to call myTask.GetAwaiter().GetResult() in Main() (from this answer).

2
  • 1
    GetAwaiter().GetResult() will block all operations on current thread until it has the result, be careful
    – BorisD
    Aug 18, 2022 at 15:26
  • Are you telling if you do this change the code will throw timeoutexception instead of TaskCancelled? In our scenario we need to get TimeoutException as we are calling third party APIs. May 18, 2023 at 13:52
25
var clientHttp = new HttpClient();
clientHttp.Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30);

The above is the best approach for waiting on a large request. You are confused about 30 minutes; it's random time and you can give any time that you want.

In other words, request will not wait for 30 minutes if they get results before 30 minutes. 30 min means request processing time is 30 min. When we occurred error "Task was cancelled", or large data request requirements.

17

Another possibility is that the result is not awaited on the client side. This can happen if any one method on the call stack does not use the await keyword to wait for the call to be completed.

0
12

Promoting @JobaDiniz's comment to an answer:

Do not do the obvious thing and dispose the HttpClient instance, even though the code "looks right":

async Task<HttpResponseMessage> Method() {
  using (var client = new HttpClient())
    return client.GetAsync(request);
}

Disposing the HttpClient instance can cause following HTTP requests started by other instances of HttpClient to be cancelled!

The same happens with C#'s new RIAA syntax; slightly less obvious:

async Task<HttpResponseMessage> Method() {
  using var client = new HttpClient();
  return client.GetAsync(request);
}

Instead, HttpClient interface is a bit crufty, and the correct way to use it in dotnet core 2.1+ is:

Use a static or singleton HttpClient instance with PooledConnectionLifetime...

Basically, cache a static instance of HttpClient for your app or library, and reuse it:

static HttpClient client = new HttpClient();

async Task<HttpResponseMessage> Method() {
  return client.GetAsync(request);
}

(The Async() request methods are all thread safe.)


However, Microsoft recommends you don't use don't directly use new HttpClient()! Instead for both dotnet core and .NET Framework, use IHttpClientFactory. One caveat: the docs for IHttpClientFactory are often for ASP.NET apps but it is possible to use it any CLI/GUI app.)

(For .NET Framework, "you can add the Microsoft.Extensions.Http NuGet package to any .NET Standard 2.0-compliant project" --see this answer.)

4
  • 1
    For anyone else reading this, this also applies to .NET Framework and not just .NET Core. Relevant documentation here and here Jul 28, 2023 at 9:17
  • I doubt that keeping a static reference to a disposable object is the correct approach. Rather follow learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/architecture/microservices/… and use the IHttpClientFactory.
    – Dejan
    Feb 12 at 10:14
  • @Dejan Microsoft says keeping a static reference is the correct way to use the HttpClient footgun. Tried to add enough helpful links, thanks to you and somethingRandom for that context! I agree that API is crufty, so I tried to update my answer with IHttpClientFactory, but I'm not familiar with that so I didn't try to include a code sample. Feel free to edit in any fixes.
    – Carl Walsh
    Feb 12 at 17:06
  • 1
    @CarlWalsh thanks for the update a linking the static-field approach with docs to back it up. And sorry for my wrong guess here. However, it hopefully helps others to not discard your answer too early.
    – Dejan
    Feb 13 at 16:38
6

in my .net core 3.1 applications I am getting two problem where inner cause was timeout exception. 1, one is i am getting aggregate exception and in it's inner exception was timeout exception 2, other case was Task canceled exception

My solution is

catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.InnerException is TimeoutException)
                {
                    ex = ex.InnerException;
                }
                else if (ex is TaskCanceledException)
                {
                    if ((ex as TaskCanceledException).CancellationToken == null || (ex as TaskCanceledException).CancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested == false)
                    {
                        ex = new TimeoutException("Timeout occurred");
                    }
                }                
                Logger.Fatal(string.Format("Exception at calling {0} :{1}", url, ex.Message), ex);
            }
2
  • Would be ex.InnerException is TaskCanceledException?
    – neiesc
    Jul 31, 2020 at 14:43
  • 1
    Also IsCancellationRequested would be true?
    – neiesc
    Jul 31, 2020 at 14:43
2

In my situation, the controller method was not made as async and the method called inside the controller method was async.

So I guess its important to use async/await all the way to top level to avoid issues like these.

1

I was using a simple call instead of async. As soon I added await and made method async it started working fine.

public async Task<T> ExecuteScalarAsync<T>(string query, object parameter = null, CommandType commandType = CommandType.Text) where T : IConvertible
        {
            using (IDbConnection db = new SqlConnection(_con))
            {
                return await db.ExecuteScalarAsync<T>(query, parameter, null, null, commandType);
            }
        }
0

Another reason can be that if you are running the service (API) and put a breakpoint in the service (and your code is stuck at some breakpoint (e.g Visual Studio solution is showing Debugging instead of Running)). and then hitting the API from the client code. So if the service code a paused on some breakpoint, you just hit F5 in VS.

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