This question is an exact duplicate of:

I'm working on writing a reduce function in Javascript. The function works correctly when no argument for start(the counter) is passed, but when a start value is passed, I get an incorrect answer. For example, if I pass ([1,2,3], function(a,b){return a + b;}, 0) to the function, it outputs 5 instead of 6. If no third argument(start value) is passed, I want the "total" variable to be set to the first element in the array using shift, so that element is then removed and not counted again.

function reduce(arr, func, start) {
    var total = start || arr.shift();
    each(arr, function(item) {
        total = func(item, total);
    });
    return total;
};

(Each is a simple forEach function I wrote, that works fine.) I've tried a ton of different variations, and I can't seem to get this to work. Is there a better way set the total variable when no third argument is passed?

marked as duplicate by Aadit M Shah javascript Mar 21 '15 at 9:58

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

  • You are trying to create a JS function that SUMS all elements in an array ? – besciualex Mar 21 '15 at 9:01
  • Not neccessarily that sums, just one that reduces the elements in an array to one based on a passed function(func argument). It could multiply them or reduce in another way, I just used sum since it's easiest. – Matt Bass Mar 21 '15 at 9:02
  • 2
    I run it and it returns 6 for me: jsfiddle.net/07hgjLcd – zerkms Mar 21 '15 at 9:04
  • It is working fine and give 6 whats the actuall issue? – A.B Mar 21 '15 at 9:05
  • Also, what happens if start is 0? That will be considered "falsey" by JS, so it will use the first element in the array instead. That could be a nasty bug to find one day. The way UnderscoreJS and Lodash do it is to use arguments.length < 3 as the condition instead. – GregL Mar 21 '15 at 9:07

I would not modifiy the original array, that's a rather undesirable side-effect in a reduce function.

Explicit is also better than implicit. You might want to use a falsy value for "start", after all.

function reduce(arr, func, start) {
    var total; i;
    if (typeof start === "undefined") {
        total = arr[0];
        i = 1;
    } else {
        total = start;
        i = 0;
    }
    for (; i < arr.length; i++) {
        total = func(arr[i], total);
    }
    return total;
};

And just for fun, a recursive implementation (which will be optimized using TR optimization in ES6):

function reduce(arr, func, start) {
    if (arr.length == 0) {
        return start;
    }

    var accum = typeof start == 'undefined' ? arr[0] : func(start, arr[0]);

    return reduce(arr.slice(1), func, accum);
}

console.log(reduce([1,2,3], function(a,b){return a + b;}));

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/k3kuoz3w/1/

UPD:

In the comments @Tomalak mentioned that this solution would create an array every iteration.

For even better fun here is a solution that does not create unnecessary copies:

function reduce(arr, func, start, i) {
    if (arr.length == i) {
        return start;
    }

    i = i || 0;

    var accum = typeof start == 'undefined' ? arr[i] : func(start, arr[i]);

    return reduce(arr, func, accum, i + 1);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/k3kuoz3w/2/

UPD 2:

the last solution (I promise) that encapsulates the dirty i exposed in the previous code:

function reduce(arr, func, start) {
    function real_reduce(arr, func, start, i) {
        if (arr.length == i) {
            return start;
        }

        var accum = typeof start == 'undefined' ? arr[i] : func(start, arr[i]);

        return real_reduce(arr, func, accum, i + 1);
    }

    return real_reduce(arr, func, start, 0)
}

http://jsfiddle.net/k3kuoz3w/3/

  • 1
    The tail-recursive variant is nice. I would just avoid it because it needlessly creates new arrays with every step. – Tomalak Mar 21 '15 at 9:22
  • @Tomalak indeed. In a "better language" it would reuse the tail though. – zerkms Mar 21 '15 at 9:24
  • Oh, you can do that in JavaScript, too. You just have to avoid slice. :) – Tomalak Mar 21 '15 at 9:24
  • @Tomalak to pass a structure with an array and index altogether? – zerkms Mar 21 '15 at 9:25
  • 1
    I'm a bit reluctant about exposing the i parameter in the outer function signature. That goes against the principle of reduce... that's why I spoke of an inner function. – Tomalak Mar 21 '15 at 9:34

another simple recursive function

Newer:

function reduce(arr, fn, start) {
  if(typeof start !== "undefined") {
    return recur([start].concat(arr), 0);
  } else {
    return recur(arr,0)
  }
  function recur(arr, index) {
    if(arr.length === 0) {
      return RangeError();
    } else if(index + 1 === arr.length) {
      return arr[index];
    } else {
      return fn(arr[index] , recur(arr, index + 1));
    }
  }
}
console.log(reduce([1, 2, 3], function(a, b) {return a + b}))
console.log(reduce([1, 2, 3], function(a, b) {return a + b}, 9))
console.log(reduce([1, 2, 3], function(a, b) {return a + b}, 0))
console.log(reduce([1, 2, 3], function(a, b) {return a * b}, 1))
console.log(reduce([], function(a, b) {return a + b}, 0))

OLDER Comment(Don't refer this) :

reduce(arr, fn, start) { if(typeof start === undefined) { return reduce(arr, fn, 0) } else { var total = start; each(arr, function(item) { total = func(item, total); }); return total; } }

  • It's not correct to define 0 as an initial value. If reduction function is * then the identity value must be 1 for example. I actually wouldn't call it recursive as well, since the main job is still done in an explicit loop with a mutable state. – zerkms Mar 21 '15 at 9:19
  • true agreed with you – WebServer Mar 21 '15 at 9:22

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