187

Is it possible to create a template string as a usual string,

let a = "b:${b}";

and then convert it into a template string,

let b = 10;
console.log(a.template()); // b:10

without eval, new Function and other means of dynamic code generation?

7
  • 7
    did you find a way to achieve this? I might be needing to do it one day and am curious to know what you've arrived at. Aug 13 '15 at 23:17
  • 1
    @BryanRayner lets say your js program is trying to fetch a data from rest API, whose url is in a config.js file as a string "/resources/<resource_id>/update/" and you put "resource_id" dynamically from your program. Unless you want to split that url into parts and save in different areas, you need some sort of string template processing. Dec 27 '16 at 5:55
  • 1
  • Instead of using eval better is use to regex Eval it's not recommended & highly discouraged, so please don't use it developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…! let b = 10; let a="b:${b}"; let response = a.replace(/\${\w+}/ ,b); conssole.log(response); Jul 16 '20 at 12:28
  • @Ryu_hayabusa I believe the goal here is specifically to be able to reference these variable values without template preprocessing so that we can manipulate with them live rather than only on the server-side. Jun 3 at 15:33

18 Answers 18

123

In my project I've created something like this with ES6:

String.prototype.interpolate = function(params) {
  const names = Object.keys(params);
  const vals = Object.values(params);
  return new Function(...names, `return \`${this}\`;`)(...vals);
}

const template = 'Example text: ${text}';
const result = template.interpolate({
  text: 'Foo Boo'
});
console.log(result);

22
  • 2
    Hi, Your solution works great, but when i used it in React Native(build mode), it throws an error: Invalid character '`', though it works when i run in debug mode. Looks like, babel issue, any help? May 22 '17 at 17:55
  • 1
    @MohitPandey I was getting same error when I was running tests of this code under PhantomJS and it was passing under chrome. If that is the case, I think there is new beta version of PhantomJS on the way with better support for ES6, you can try to install it. May 23 '17 at 11:11
  • 1
    Unfortunately, it doesn't work and i wrote down a regex for the same. Added as answer as well. May 23 '17 at 15:16
  • 1
    this solution only works if the back-tick "`" character is not present in the template string Sep 19 '17 at 19:21
  • 2
    Sorry guys, it works now: document.querySelector("template").innerHTML.interpolate(viewerData); Aug 8 '20 at 9:27
104

As your template string must get reference to the b variable dynamically (in runtime), so the answer is: NO, it's impossible to do it without dynamic code generation.

But, with eval it's pretty simple:

let tpl = eval('`'+a+'`');
11
  • 9
    eval is insecure, so is other means of dynamic code generation
    – KOLANICH
    Mar 22 '15 at 9:53
  • 9
    @KOLANICH For particular that case - escape back quotes in the a string and it will be much less insecure: let tpl = eval('`'+a.replace(/`/g,'\\`')+'`');. I think more important is that eval prevent compiler to optimize your code. But I think it irrelevant to this question.
    – alexpods
    Mar 22 '15 at 10:10
  • 3
    In fact, you can also run functions inside template strings.
    – KOLANICH
    Mar 22 '15 at 10:15
  • 10
    @KOLANICH Sorry you dislike eval. However, remember that a template literal is itself a form of eval. Two examples: var test=Result: ${alert('hello')}; var test=Result: ${b=4}; Both will end up executing arbitrary code in the context of the script. If you want to allow arbitrary strings, you may as well as allow eval.
    – Manngo
    Aug 14 '16 at 2:02
  • 6
    Be careful. Since something like babel won't transpile this, this code will NOT work in IE
    – cgsd
    Jan 9 '17 at 20:39
31

No, there is not a way to do this without dynamic code generation.

However, I have created a function which will turn a regular string into a function which can be provided with a map of values, using template strings internally.

Generate Template String Gist

/**
 * Produces a function which uses template strings to do simple interpolation from objects.
 * 
 * Usage:
 *    var makeMeKing = generateTemplateString('${name} is now the king of ${country}!');
 * 
 *    console.log(makeMeKing({ name: 'Bryan', country: 'Scotland'}));
 *    // Logs 'Bryan is now the king of Scotland!'
 */
var generateTemplateString = (function(){
    var cache = {};

    function generateTemplate(template){
        var fn = cache[template];

        if (!fn){
            // Replace ${expressions} (etc) with ${map.expressions}.

            var sanitized = template
                .replace(/\$\{([\s]*[^;\s\{]+[\s]*)\}/g, function(_, match){
                    return `\$\{map.${match.trim()}\}`;
                    })
                // Afterwards, replace anything that's not ${map.expressions}' (etc) with a blank string.
                .replace(/(\$\{(?!map\.)[^}]+\})/g, '');

            fn = Function('map', `return \`${sanitized}\``);
        }

        return fn;
    }

    return generateTemplate;
})();

Usage:

var kingMaker = generateTemplateString('${name} is king!');

console.log(kingMaker({name: 'Bryan'}));
// Logs 'Bryan is king!' to the console.

Hope this helps somebody. If you find a problem with the code, please be so kind as to update the Gist.

8
  • Thanks! I used this instead of a javascript sprintf solution. Apr 13 '16 at 22:24
  • 1
    doesn't work for every templates var test = generateTemplateString('/api/${param1}/${param2}/') console.log(test({param1: 'bar', param2: 'foo'})) return /api/bar// Jul 29 '16 at 5:41
  • Thanks, fixed. The regex was including a single match of ${param1}/${param2} when it should have been two matches. Jul 29 '16 at 14:21
  • Note that this one doesn't work in IE11, because of missing support for back ticks.
    – s.meijer
    Jan 17 '17 at 12:07
  • 1
    Of course, if template strings aren't supported by a browser, this method won't work. If you want to use template strings in unsupported browsers, I would recommend using a language like TypeScript, or a transpiler like Babel; That's the only way to get ES6 into old browsers. Jan 17 '17 at 13:31
30

What you're asking for here:

//non working code quoted from the question
let b=10;
console.log(a.template());//b:10

is exactly equivalent (in terms of power and, er, safety) to eval: the ability to take a string containing code and execute that code; and also the ability for the executed code to see local variables in the caller's environment.

There is no way in JS for a function to see local variables in its caller, unless that function is eval(). Even Function() can't do it.


When you hear there's something called "template strings" coming to JavaScript, it's natural to assume it's a built-in template library, like Mustache. It isn't. It's mainly just string interpolation and multiline strings for JS. I think this is going to be a common misconception for a while, though. :(

3
  • 3
    TBH that's what I thought it was. Would have been very, very handy. Aug 13 '15 at 22:11
  • Does this (still) work? I'm getting template is not a function. Dec 31 '15 at 4:30
  • 3
    The code block at the top of this answer is a quote from the question. It does not work. Jan 6 '16 at 18:24
15

There are many good solutions posted here, but none yet which utilizes the ES6 String.raw method. Here is my contriubution. It has an important limitation in that it will only accept properties from a passed in object, meaning no code execution in the template will work.

function parseStringTemplate(str, obj) {
    let parts = str.split(/\$\{(?!\d)[\wæøåÆØÅ]*\}/);
    let args = str.match(/[^{\}]+(?=})/g) || [];
    let parameters = args.map(argument => obj[argument] || (obj[argument] === undefined ? "" : obj[argument]));
    return String.raw({ raw: parts }, ...parameters);
}
let template = "Hello, ${name}! Are you ${age} years old?";
let values = { name: "John Doe", age: 18 };

parseStringTemplate(template, values);
// output: Hello, John Doe! Are you 18 years old?
  1. Split string into non-argument textual parts. See regex.
    parts: ["Hello, ", "! Are you ", " years old?"]
  2. Split string into property names. Empty array if match fails.
    args: ["name", "age"]
  3. Map parameters from obj by property name. Solution is limited by shallow one level mapping. Undefined values are substituted with an empty string, but other falsy values are accepted.
    parameters: ["John Doe", 18]
  4. Utilize String.raw(...) and return result.
2
  • 2
    Out of curiosity, what value is String.raw actually providing here? It seems you're doing all the work of parsing the string and keeping track of what the substitions are. Is this much different from simply calling .replace() repeatedly? May 12 '20 at 1:31
  • Fair point, @SteveBennett. I had some problems turning a normal string into a template string, and found a solution by building the raw object myself. I guess it reduces String.raw to a concatenation method, but I think it works quite well. I would like to see a nice solution with .replace(), though :) I think readability is important, so while using regular expressions myself, I try to name them to help make sense of it all...
    – pekaaw
    May 13 '20 at 9:02
12

TLDR: https://jsfiddle.net/bj89zntu/1/

Everyone seems to be worried about accessing variables. Why not just pass them? I'm sure it won't be too hard to get the variable context in the caller and pass it down. Use ninjagecko's answer to get the props from obj.

function renderString(str,obj){
    return str.replace(/\$\{(.+?)\}/g,(match,p1)=>{return index(obj,p1)})
}

Here is the full code:

function index(obj,is,value) {
    if (typeof is == 'string')
        is=is.split('.');
    if (is.length==1 && value!==undefined)
        return obj[is[0]] = value;
    else if (is.length==0)
        return obj;
    else
        return index(obj[is[0]],is.slice(1), value);
}

function renderString(str,obj){
    return str.replace(/\$\{.+?\}/g,(match)=>{return index(obj,match)})
}

renderString('abc${a}asdas',{a:23,b:44}) //abc23asdas
renderString('abc${a.c}asdas',{a:{c:22,d:55},b:44}) //abc22asdas
5
  • @s.meijer could you elaborate? I am using this code successfully. jsfiddle.net/w3jx07vt
    – M3D
    Jan 19 '17 at 1:25
  • 1
    Better regex would allow you to not select the ${} characters. Try: /(?!\${)([^{}]*)(?=})/g Jul 3 '17 at 17:34
  • @Relic jsfiddle.net/w3jx07vt/2 I couldn't get that working, care to lend a hand and I'll update my post? :)
    – M3D
    Jul 5 '17 at 2:54
  • So the way you're trying to grab it this won't actually help much, I ended up doing a string replace instead. Instead of adding a step of interpolation, so I can use the string as interp or string. Not fancy, but it worked. Jul 6 '17 at 23:13
  • @EricHodonsky Could you elaborate on "the way I'm trying to grab it"? Perhaps share your use case. Most of the above solutions focus on code generation, which my solution does not require. The problem here is A) Accessing the variables (which I do not do, letting the user pass them in instead), B) finding where to substitute names, C) looking up names (on an object, in this case). This works according to jsfiddle.
    – M3D
    Jan 10 at 5:50
10

The issue here is to have a function that has access to the variables of its caller. This is why we see direct eval being used for template processing. A possible solution would be to generate a function taking formal parameters named by a dictionary's properties, and calling it with the corresponding values in the same order. An alternative way would be to have something simple as this:

var name = "John Smith";
var message = "Hello, my name is ${name}";
console.log(new Function('return `' + message + '`;')());

And for anyone using Babel compiler we need to create closure which remembers the environment in which it was created:

console.log(new Function('name', 'return `' + message + '`;')(name));
4
  • 1
    Your first snippet is actually worse than eval because it works only with a global name variable
    – Bergi
    Nov 28 '15 at 23:06
  • @Bergi Your statement is valid - the scope of the function will be lost. I wanted to present an easy solution to the problem and provided a simplified example of what can be done. One could simply come up with the following to overcome the problem: var template = function() { var name = "John Smith"; var message = "Hello, my name is ${name}"; this.local = new Function('return ' + message + ';')();}
    – didinko
    Nov 29 '15 at 12:49
  • No, that's exactly what would not work - new Function doesn't have access to the var name in the template function.
    – Bergi
    Nov 29 '15 at 13:49
  • The second snip fixed my problem... Up vote from me! Thanks, this helped solve a temporary problem we were having with dynamic routing to an iframe :)
    – Kris Boyd
    Jul 20 '17 at 19:00
9

Similar to Daniel's answer (and s.meijer's gist) but more readable:

const regex = /\${[^{]+}/g;

export default function interpolate(template, variables, fallback) {
    return template.replace(regex, (match) => {
        const path = match.slice(2, -1).trim();
        return getObjPath(path, variables, fallback);
    });
}

//get the specified property or nested property of an object
function getObjPath(path, obj, fallback = '') {
    return path.split('.').reduce((res, key) => res[key] || fallback, obj);
}

Note: This slightly improves s.meijer's original, since it won't match things like ${foo{bar} (the regex only allows non-curly brace characters inside ${ and }).


UPDATE: I was asked for an example using this, so here you go:

const replacements = {
    name: 'Bob',
    age: 37
}

interpolate('My name is ${name}, and I am ${age}.', replacements)
4
  • Can you post an example actually using this? This javascript is a bit beyond me. I'd suggest a regex of /\$\{(.*?)(?!\$\{)\}/g (to handle nest curly braces). I have a working solution but I'm not sure it's as portable as yours, so I'd love to see how this should be implemented in a page. Mine also uses eval().
    – Regular Jo
    Jan 17 '18 at 5:08
  • I went ahead and posted an answer as well, and I'd love your feedback on how to make that more secure and performance-minded: stackoverflow.com/a/48294208.
    – Regular Jo
    Jan 17 '18 at 5:38
  • @RegularJoe I added an example. My goal was to keep it simple, but you're right that if you want to handle nested curly braces, you would need to change the regex. However, I can't think of a use case for that when evaluating a regular string as if it were a template literal (the whole purpose of this function). What did you have in mind? Jan 17 '18 at 22:25
  • Also, I am neither a performance expert nor a security expert; my answer is really just combining two previous answers. But I will say that using eval leaves you a lot more open to possible mistakes that would cause security issues, whereas all my version is doing is looking up a property on an object from a dot-separated path, which should be safe. Jan 17 '18 at 22:30
8

I liked s.meijer's answer and wrote my own version based on his:

function parseTemplate(template, map, fallback) {
    return template.replace(/\$\{[^}]+\}/g, (match) => 
        match
            .slice(2, -1)
            .trim()
            .split(".")
            .reduce(
                (searchObject, key) => searchObject[key] || fallback || match,
                map
            )
    );
}
3
  • 1
    Neat! Really Neat!
    – xpt
    Feb 19 '18 at 22:41
  • Why the reducer?
    – KooiInc
    Dec 22 '20 at 14:10
  • instead of searchObject[key], I had to use searchObject.hasOwnProperty(key) to support falsy values.
    – cyrf
    May 24 at 6:23
5

@Mateusz Moska, solution works great, but when i used it in React Native(build mode), it throws an error: Invalid character '`', though it works when i run it in debug mode.

So i wrote down my own solution using regex.

String.prototype.interpolate = function(params) {
  let template = this
  for (let key in params) {
    template = template.replace(new RegExp('\\$\\{' + key + '\\}', 'g'), params[key])
  }
  return template
}

const template = 'Example text: ${text}',
  result = template.interpolate({
    text: 'Foo Boo'
  })

console.log(result)

Demo: https://es6console.com/j31pqx1p/

NOTE: Since I don't know the root cause of an issue, i raised a ticket in react-native repo, https://github.com/facebook/react-native/issues/14107, so that once they can able to fix/guide me about the same :)

1
  • this does support templates containing the back-tick character. However, rather than try to invent a templating pattern, you are probably better off just using mustache or similar. depending on how complex your templates are this is a brute force approach that doesn't consider edge cases - the key could contain a special regex pattern. Sep 19 '17 at 19:26
4

You can use the string prototype, for example

String.prototype.toTemplate=function(){
    return eval('`'+this+'`');
}
//...
var a="b:${b}";
var b=10;
console.log(a.toTemplate());//b:10

But the answer of the original question is no way.

4

I required this method with support for Internet Explorer. It turned out the back ticks aren't supported by even IE11. Also; using eval or it's equivalent Function doesn't feel right.

For the one that notice; I also use backticks, but these ones are removed by compilers like babel. The methods suggested by other ones, depend on them on run-time. As said before; this is an issue in IE11 and lower.

So this is what I came up with:

function get(path, obj, fb = `$\{${path}}`) {
  return path.split('.').reduce((res, key) => res[key] || fb, obj);
}

function parseTpl(template, map, fallback) {
  return template.replace(/\$\{.+?}/g, (match) => {
    const path = match.substr(2, match.length - 3).trim();
    return get(path, map, fallback);
  });
}

Example output:

const data = { person: { name: 'John', age: 18 } };

parseTpl('Hi ${person.name} (${person.age})', data);
// output: Hi John (18)

parseTpl('Hello ${person.name} from ${person.city}', data);
// output: Hello John from ${person.city}

parseTpl('Hello ${person.name} from ${person.city}', data, '-');
// output: Hello John from -
3
  • "using eval or it's equivalent Function doesn't feel right." ... Yeah... I agree, but I think this is one of the very few use cases in which one could say, "mmhkay, let's use it". Please check jsperf.com/es6-string-tmpl -- it's my practical use case. Using your function (with the same regexp as mine) and mine (eval + string literals). Thanks! :) Feb 21 '17 at 10:46
  • @AndreaPuddu, your performance is indeed better. But then again; template strings are unsupported in IE. So eval('`' + taggedURL + '`') simply doesn't work.
    – s.meijer
    Feb 21 '17 at 11:57
  • "Seems" better I'd say, because it's tested in isolation... The only purpose of that test was to see the potential performance issues using eval. Regarding template literals: thanks for pointing that out again. I'm using Babel to transpile my code but my function will still not work apparently 😐 Feb 22 '17 at 13:50
3

I currently can't comment on existing answers so I am unable to directly comment on Bryan Raynor's excellent response. Thus, this response is going to update his answer with a slight correction.

In short, his function fails to actually cache the created function, so it will always recreate, regardless of whether it's seen the template before. Here is the corrected code:

    /**
     * Produces a function which uses template strings to do simple interpolation from objects.
     * 
     * Usage:
     *    var makeMeKing = generateTemplateString('${name} is now the king of ${country}!');
     * 
     *    console.log(makeMeKing({ name: 'Bryan', country: 'Scotland'}));
     *    // Logs 'Bryan is now the king of Scotland!'
     */
    var generateTemplateString = (function(){
        var cache = {};

        function generateTemplate(template){
            var fn = cache[template];

            if (!fn){
                // Replace ${expressions} (etc) with ${map.expressions}.

                var sanitized = template
                    .replace(/\$\{([\s]*[^;\s\{]+[\s]*)\}/g, function(_, match){
                        return `\$\{map.${match.trim()}\}`;
                    })
                    // Afterwards, replace anything that's not ${map.expressions}' (etc) with a blank string.
                    .replace(/(\$\{(?!map\.)[^}]+\})/g, '');

                fn = cache[template] = Function('map', `return \`${sanitized}\``);
            }

            return fn;
        };

        return generateTemplate;
    })();
3

Still dynamic but seems more controlled than just using a naked eval:

const vm = require('vm')
const moment = require('moment')


let template = '### ${context.hours_worked[0].value} \n Hours worked \n #### ${Math.abs(context.hours_worked_avg_diff[0].value)}% ${fns.gt0(context.hours_worked_avg_diff[0].value, "more", "less")} than usual on ${fns.getDOW(new Date())}'
let context = {
  hours_worked:[{value:10}],
  hours_worked_avg_diff:[{value:10}],

}


function getDOW(now) {
  return moment(now).locale('es').format('dddd')
}

function gt0(_in, tVal, fVal) {
  return _in >0 ? tVal: fVal
}



function templateIt(context, template) {
  const script = new vm.Script('`'+template+'`')
  return script.runInNewContext({context, fns:{getDOW, gt0 }})
}

console.log(templateIt(context, template))

https://repl.it/IdVt/3

1

This solution works without ES6:

function render(template, opts) {
  return new Function(
    'return new Function (' + Object.keys(opts).reduce((args, arg) => args += '\'' + arg + '\',', '') + '\'return `' + template.replace(/(^|[^\\])'/g, '$1\\\'') + '`;\'' +
    ').apply(null, ' + JSON.stringify(Object.keys(opts).reduce((vals, key) => vals.push(opts[key]) && vals, [])) + ');'
  )();
}

render("hello ${ name }", {name:'mo'}); // "hello mo"

Note: the Function constructor is always created in the global scope, which could potentially cause global variables to be overwritten by the template, e.g. render("hello ${ someGlobalVar = 'some new value' }", {name:'mo'});

1

You should try this tiny JS module, by Andrea Giammarchi, from github : https://github.com/WebReflection/backtick-template

/*! (C) 2017 Andrea Giammarchi - MIT Style License */
function template(fn, $str, $object) {'use strict';
  var
    stringify = JSON.stringify,
    hasTransformer = typeof fn === 'function',
    str = hasTransformer ? $str : fn,
    object = hasTransformer ? $object : $str,
    i = 0, length = str.length,
    strings = i < length ? [] : ['""'],
    values = hasTransformer ? [] : strings,
    open, close, counter
  ;
  while (i < length) {
    open = str.indexOf('${', i);
    if (-1 < open) {
      strings.push(stringify(str.slice(i, open)));
      open += 2;
      close = open;
      counter = 1;
      while (close < length) {
        switch (str.charAt(close++)) {
          case '}': counter -= 1; break;
          case '{': counter += 1; break;
        }
        if (counter < 1) {
          values.push('(' + str.slice(open, close - 1) + ')');
          break;
        }
      }
      i = close;
    } else {
      strings.push(stringify(str.slice(i)));
      i = length;
    }
  }
  if (hasTransformer) {
    str = 'function' + (Math.random() * 1e5 | 0);
    if (strings.length === values.length) strings.push('""');
    strings = [
      str,
      'with(this)return ' + str + '([' + strings + ']' + (
        values.length ? (',' + values.join(',')) : ''
      ) + ')'
    ];
  } else {
    strings = ['with(this)return ' + strings.join('+')];
  }
  return Function.apply(null, strings).apply(
    object,
    hasTransformer ? [fn] : []
  );
}

template.asMethod = function (fn, object) {'use strict';
  return typeof fn === 'function' ?
    template(fn, this, object) :
    template(this, fn);
};

Demo (all the following tests return true):

const info = 'template';
// just string
`some ${info}` === template('some ${info}', {info});

// passing through a transformer
transform `some ${info}` === template(transform, 'some ${info}', {info});

// using it as String method
String.prototype.template = template.asMethod;

`some ${info}` === 'some ${info}'.template({info});

transform `some ${info}` === 'some ${info}'.template(transform, {info});
1

I made my own solution doing a type with a description as a function

export class Foo {
...
description?: Object;
...
}

let myFoo:Foo = {
...
  description: (a,b) => `Welcome ${a}, glad to see you like the ${b} section`.
...
}

and so doing:

let myDescription = myFoo.description('Bar', 'bar');
0

Since we're reinventing the wheel on something that would be a lovely feature in javascript.

I use eval(), which is not secure, but javascript is not secure. I readily admit that I'm not excellent with javascript, but I had a need, and I needed an answer so I made one.

I chose to stylize my variables with an @ rather than an $, particularly because I want to use the multiline feature of literals without evaluating til it's ready. So variable syntax is @{OptionalObject.OptionalObjectN.VARIABLE_NAME}

I am no javascript expert, so I'd gladly take advice on improvement but...

var prsLiteral, prsRegex = /\@\{(.*?)(?!\@\{)\}/g
for(i = 0; i < myResultSet.length; i++) {
    prsLiteral = rt.replace(prsRegex,function (match,varname) {
        return eval(varname + "[" + i + "]");
        // you could instead use return eval(varname) if you're not looping.
    })
    console.log(prsLiteral);
}

A very simple implementation follows

myResultSet = {totalrecords: 2,
Name: ["Bob", "Stephanie"],
Age: [37,22]};

rt = `My name is @{myResultSet.Name}, and I am @{myResultSet.Age}.`

var prsLiteral, prsRegex = /\@\{(.*?)(?!\@\{)\}/g
for(i = 0; i < myResultSet.totalrecords; i++) {
    prsLiteral = rt.replace(prsRegex,function (match,varname) {
        return eval(varname + "[" + i + "]");
        // you could instead use return eval(varname) if you're not looping.
    })
    console.log(prsLiteral);
}

In my actual implementation, I choose to use @{{variable}}. One more set of braces. Absurdly unlikely to encounter that unexpectedly. The regex for that would look like /\@\{\{(.*?)(?!\@\{\{)\}\}/g

To make that easier to read

\@\{\{    # opening sequence, @{{ literally.
(.*?)     # capturing the variable name
          # ^ captures only until it reaches the closing sequence
(?!       # negative lookahead, making sure the following
          # ^ pattern is not found ahead of the current character
  \@\{\{  # same as opening sequence, if you change that, change this
)
\}\}      # closing sequence.

If you're not experienced with regex, a pretty safe rule is to escape every non-alphanumeric character, and don't ever needlessly escape letters as many escaped letters have special meaning to virtually all flavors of regex.

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