30

I have implemented the following interface:

template <typename T>
class Variable
{
public:
  Variable (T v) : m_value (v) {}
  virtual void Callback () = 0;
private:
  T m_value;
};

A proper derived class would be defined like this:

class Derived : public Variable<int>
{
public:
  Derived (int v) : Variable<int> (v) {}
  void Callback () {}
};

However, I would like to derive classes where Callback accepts different parameters (eg: void Callback (int a, int b)). Is there a way to do it?

5
  • 1
    How do you call Callback (in the base class)?
    – kennytm
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 8:36
  • 3
    Not sure what you mean by 'calling Callback in the base class'. Actually, I cannot have Variable instances, since Callback is pure virtual. Did I misunderstood your comment?
    – Jir
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 8:46
  • 2
    restating KennyTM question: How do you call the Callback from a reference/pointer to Variable? A different question (or maybe the same rephrased again) is how are the arguments passed into the most derived object? Commented May 27, 2010 at 9:15
  • Would you like the derived classes to have different callbacks for the same Variable<T>, or for different Variable<T>s? Commented May 27, 2010 at 9:43
  • @dribeas: to answer your second question, the arguments are passed by value. @MadKeithV: neither of the two. I would like to have in each derived class a method called Callback with void return type and accepting different parameters (with respect to the base class). So, for example we could have void DerivedA::Callback (int) and void DerivedB::Callback (char). In other words: I would like to enforce the returning type of that method and its name.
    – Jir
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 11:56

5 Answers 5

22

This is a problem I ran in a number of times.

This is impossible, and for good reasons, but there are ways to achieve essentially the same thing. Personally, I now use:

struct Base
{
  virtual void execute() = 0;
  virtual ~Base {}
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
  Derived(int a, int b): mA(a), mB(b), mR(0) {}

  int getResult() const { return mR; }

  virtual void execute() { mR = mA + mB; }

private:
  int mA, mB, mR;
};

In action:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  std::unique_ptr<Base> derived(new Derived(1,2));
  derived->execute();
  return 0;
} // main
2
  • 1
    Enlighting solution indeed. Just out of my curiosity, why do you think what I'd like to achieve is impossible 'for good reasons'?
    – Jir
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 11:58
  • 4
    Because the language has not been designed as such. The only leeway you have on virtual methods is the covariance of the return type. You could (conceivably) ask for a 'parameter' interface class and then use a derived version of this class and proceed to dynamic_cast within the method... but ugh, that smells :p Commented May 27, 2010 at 13:56
16

Even if such a thing were possible, it no longer makes much sense to have it as a virtual function, as the derived instantiations couldn't be called polymorphically via a pointer to the base class.

1
  • "as the derived instantiations couldn't be called polymorphically" - Why not? What if the state was embedded as default values to those arguments? So the interface could declare virtual void f(int a) and the overridden one could look like void f(int a, Type0 b = SomeDefault0, Type1 c = SomeDefault1) etc. Calling base->f(123) should still have worked "conceptually".
    – ustulation
    Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 15:07
4

don't think this will be possible, because you can never interface it back to Variable. This is what i mean

int a=0; int b = 0;
Variable<int>* derived = new Derived();
derived->Callback(a, b); //this won't compile because Variable<int> does not have Callback with 2 vars.
2
  • That's the point! What you wrote is what I want to achieve. I also thought of using function pointers. Still, pointer functions have to match a function signature (args+return type), so we're back to square one.
    – Jir
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 8:50
  • 1
    If you want to call Callback(a,b) from a reference/pointer to base, then that must be part of the base interface. Commented May 27, 2010 at 9:44
2

I know this there is an accepted answer, but there is one (ugly) way to achieve what you want, although I would not recommend it:

template <typename T> 
class Variable 
{ 
public: 
  Variable (T v) : m_value (v) {}
  virtual void Callback (const char *values, ...) = 0; 

private: 
  T m_value; 
};

class Derived : public Variable<int> 
{ 
public: 
  Derived (int v) : Variable<int> (v) {} 
  virtual void Callback (const char *values, ...) {
  } 
};  

Now, you can use:

  int a=0; 
  double b = 0; 
  Variable<int>* derived = new Derived(3); 
  derived->Callback("");
  derived->Callback("df", a, b);

You need the values argument in order to obtain the remaining arguments inside the method. You also need to know the argument types, and pass them like printf does.

This method is error prone, as you must match the argument types on values with the real argument types.

2
  • Interesting solution as well! Thanks for pointing it out. I agree that it's more error prone, yet it's also more flexible.
    – Jir
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 14:25
  • 1
    Technically, you don't need the argument string, so long as each derived class only provides one "overload." You do need some set parameter, but it can be ignored if you know in advance how many parameters will be passed. Commented May 27, 2010 at 15:01
1

You will have to add an overload of Callback in the base class that accepts these parameters. It would also be possible to do bad things, like accept a void*, or pass in a raw pointer-to-bytes. The only scenario in which it is valid to alter virtual function signature is when you override the return value to something polymorphic to the original return value, e.g. *this.

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