2

I have three arrays of equal lengths that I combine (as I will sort them on column c later):

double abc[][] = {
    Arrays.copyOf(a, a.length),
    Arrays.copyOf(b, a.length),
    Arrays.copyOf(c, a.length)
};

When I call

System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(abc));

I receieve:

[[4.0, 2.0, 1.3333333333333333, 5.0, 2.5, 1.6666666666666667 ....

However, I would prefer something like:

[[1.0, 1.0, 4.0], [2.0, 2.0, 5.0], [3.0, 3.0, 7.0]]

This is possible using double singlets

double test[][] = {{1,1,4},{2,2,5},{3,3,7}};

How can I populate/initialize three columns using three double[ ]?


EDIT:

Solution based on vojta's answer:

double abcT[][] = new double[abc[0].length][abc.length];
    for (int i = 0; i < abc.length; i++) {
         for (int j = 0; j < abc[0].length; j++) {
            abcT[j][i] = abc[i][j];
         }
      }
System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(abcT));
  • I really do not understand your question... Please, try to explain in once again in different words. What is ratio? What is your goal? Do you really want to use a.length in all your Arrays.copyOf? – vojta Mar 22 '15 at 18:15
  • Sorry, typo. Ratio should be "abc". My goal is to sort a, b, and c as a row on column c. To do this I must first create a row by row structure: [a, b, c]. – noumenal Mar 22 '15 at 18:18
  • 1
    Oh, I get it, maybe... You would like to populate your abc array with existing arrays, but use these arays as columns, not as rows, right? So basicaly you need to transpose your resulting matrix, right? – vojta Mar 22 '15 at 18:18
  • Yes, transposing would be one solution. – noumenal Mar 22 '15 at 18:19
1

I think there is no one-line solution of your problem, unfortunately. You will have to use some homemade code:

static <T> T[][] createMatrix(T[]... columns) {
  if (columns== null || columns.length == 0)
    return new T[0][0];

  int wid = columns.length;
  int ht = columns[0].length;

  T[][] result = new T[ht][wid];

  for (int x = 0; x < wid; x++) {
    for (int y = 0; y < ht; y++) {
      result[y][x] = columns[x][y];
    }
  }
  return result;
}

I hope it was useful.

  • JAMA uses this solution for transposing, except for the generics. I guess I will start building my own library. +1 for reuseability. – noumenal Mar 24 '15 at 19:57
0

I finally reached this more elegant solution:

    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++){
            abc[0][i] = a[i];
            abc[1][i] = b[i];
            abc[2][i] = c[i];
    }

Although it is not a general solution for n[], this avoids the need to make intermediate copies of the original arrays. And then I just swap the for-loops for row and column:

    for (int j = 0; j < abc[0].length; j++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < abc.length; i++) {
            System.out.print(abc[i][j] + " ");
        }
        System.out.print("\n");
    }

Note: This solution does not store in the intended R:C format, but retrieves in C:R.

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