-2

I am trying to determine if a number is odd or even in without using modulus % or any libraries, or even bitwise calculations (& and |). I believe it has something to do with raising n to the power of something, but this is all I have:

def isOdd(num):
    return num**2 > 0

Which obviously doesn't work.

  • 4
    Why do you want to avoid modulo? – wnnmaw Mar 23 '15 at 15:53
  • 5
    And why do you now want to avoid bitwise operations?! – Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 23 '15 at 15:56
  • 1
    My guess is "because the homework says so". Have you considered integer division? Or is that also not allowed? – Teepeemm Mar 23 '15 at 15:57
  • 1
    str(num)[-1] in "13579"? – Mark Dickinson Mar 23 '15 at 15:57
  • @Teepeemm My thoughts as well. Certainly it is not true that any number with a positive square is odd! – Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 23 '15 at 15:57
14

You can raise -1 to the power of n, and see if the number is 1 or -1:

def isOdd(num):
    if type(num) not in [int, long]:
        return False
    if ((-1)**num) == 1: 
        return False 
    return True 

As such:

>>> isOdd(5.2)
False
>>> isOdd(5)
True
>>> isOdd(6)
False

Or, you can check if the number is a float, and if it isn't see if the last digit is odd:

def isOdd(num):
    if type(num) not in [int, long]:
        return False
    if str(num)[-1] in "13579":
        return True
    return False

You can also check to see if the num/2 is a float or an integer:

def isOdd(num): 
     return not (num/2.0).is_integer() and type(num) in [int, long]

>>> isOdd(5)
True
>>> isOdd(-3.4)
False
>>> isOdd(4)
False
  • Typechecking that way will cause problems; for example, in Python 2, your first code gives isOdd(1000000000000000000000000001) == False. – DSM Mar 23 '15 at 16:07
  • @DSM fixed for long and int checking – A.J. Uppal Mar 23 '15 at 16:08
  • No, it's not.. to be honest, I think the typechecking is unnecessary noise here. And if really you did care, then it's traditional to throw a TypeError rather than silently returning False, which would lead to isOdd(3.0) being False. – DSM Mar 23 '15 at 16:27
  • The first solution now gives False for isOdd(5). Even if you do do type-checking, you probably don't want to compare the type of num with the strings 'int' and 'long'. :-) – Mark Dickinson Mar 23 '15 at 17:32
  • @MarkDickinson oops, my bad :D – A.J. Uppal Mar 23 '15 at 17:55
5

You can use:

def isOdd(x):
    return x - 2 * (x // 2) == 1

or (just kidding)

import math
def isOdd(x):
   return math.cos(x * math.pi) < 0
  • 1
    I cannot use bitwise calculations. – Lidist WuTang Mar 23 '15 at 15:56
  • What about now? – JuniorCompressor Mar 23 '15 at 15:59
  • I like the math.cos solution, but the floating-point equality test makes me a bit nervous. If you spell it as math.cos(x * math.pi) < 0, it'll give correct results for a much larger range of inputs. (As written, it fails when x = 25211263 on my machine, but that's just my machine: the first point of failure is going to depend on how cos is implemented in the system's math library.) – Mark Dickinson Mar 23 '15 at 16:21
  • It's more for comic relief :) – JuniorCompressor Mar 23 '15 at 16:23
  • 2
    Yes, this whole question is going the way of silly solutions. I propose: sum(map(int, ('1' * x).replace('11', '00'))) == 1 – Mark Dickinson Mar 23 '15 at 16:30
2
def isOdd(num):
    return (num & 1) == 1

Using the bitwise AND.

EDIT: Without bitwise in python3:

def isOdd(num):
    return (num / 2) != (num // 2)

One is true division (5/2 = 2.5) the other natural division (5/2 = 2).

  • This is a good and very typical solution but you should explain better. Bitwise operations are a common source of confusion for new developers. – Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 23 '15 at 15:56
  • 1
    I cannot use bitwise calculations. – Lidist WuTang Mar 23 '15 at 15:56
  • @Lidist-WuTang What about my edit? – Soronbe Mar 23 '15 at 16:02
  • The question is tagged in python-2.x. – A.J. Uppal Mar 23 '15 at 16:05
  • You could convert the solution to Python 2 by doing (num / 2.) != (num // 2). The // operator has been around for a good while, and the 2. (carefully note the decimal) forces float division. – Two-Bit Alchemist Mar 23 '15 at 17:59
0

Just another couple of ways of doing this:

def is_odd_1(x):
    return int(x / 2.) != x / 2.

def is_odd_2(x):
    return x // 2 != x / 2.
  • 1
    x would have to be constrained in size here: both these functions give False for an input of 10**16 + 1 (or 2**53 + 1). – Mark Dickinson Mar 23 '15 at 16:15

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