-1
temp = '32'
if temp > 85:
      print "Hot"
elif temp > 62:
      print "Comfortable" 
else:
      print "Cold" 

Why does it give output 'Hot' , shouldn't it be 'Cold' ?

0
6

Because temp is a string and not an integer.

For Benji: we know it's a string because the value assigned to the variable is wrapped in single quotes!

More for Benji: we know it's not an integer because if it was, it would be quote-less! temp = 34 like so

3
  • 3
    Best answer in the world, truly inspirational. Mar 23 '15 at 20:56
  • Can you please explain how we know temp is a string? Mar 23 '15 at 20:58
  • Thanks for the clarification! How do we know it's not an integer though? Mar 23 '15 at 21:01
4

As others have said, you are comparing a string to an integer, and should really just compare integers to one another. The reason why it returns True however, is because :

>>> type('32')  
<type 'str'>
>>> type(85)
<type 'int'>
>>> 'str' > 'int 
True

If you were curious how different types are evaluated in Python 2.7 with <:

>>> """any number type""" < dict() < list() < set() < str() < tuple()
True

Note that as mentioned by Martijn Pieters in the comments, number types are placed explicitly before all other types, and this behavior is not a result of the alphabetical sorting of type names.

2
  • 'str' > 'int' is just a coincidence here. Python explicitly puts numbers before other types, that has no connection to the alphabetical sorting order of their type names.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Mar 23 '15 at 17:18
  • @MartijnPieters Edited, thanks.
    – miradulo
    Mar 23 '15 at 17:21
2

By putting quotes around '32', you're defining it as a string, and then comparing it to an int.

Python evaluates strings to be 'greater than' ints, based on the type name: How does Python compare string and int?

Just remove the quotes around '32', and it'll work.

0

You are comparing a string to an integer. Strings are always greater than integers regardless of their content. See here for more on why this is the case. Just make your variable an integer.

0

Remove the single quotations around the number temp I.e.

temp = 42

Not

temp = '42'

This is due to letters and number strings are coverted to their ASCII equivalent then compared. An example of this is the letter 'A' = 0, 'a' = 30. You can look these values up online for more understanding.

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