34

I want to take the absolute of a number by the following code in bash:

#!/bin/bash
echo "Enter the first file name: "
read first

echo "Enter the second file name: "
read second

s1=$(stat --format=%s "$first")
s2=$(stat -c '%s' "$second")

res= expr $s2 - $s1

if [ "$res" -lt 0 ]
then
        res=$res \* -1
fi

echo $res

Now the problem I am facing is in the if statement, no matter what I changes it always goes in the if, I tried to put [[ ]] around the statement but nothing.

Here is the error:

./p6.sh: line 13: [: : integer expression expected
2
  • 1
    one of the easier ways could be adding extra line after calculating the $res res=echo $res | tr -d -
    – prash
    Sep 25, 2017 at 11:25
  • 1
    why not res=$(s2 - s1); res=${res#-}?
    – Fravadona
    Dec 7, 2021 at 17:20

9 Answers 9

79

You might just take ${var#-}.

${var#Pattern} Remove from $var the shortest part of $Pattern that matches the front end of $var. tdlp


Example:

s2=5; s1=4
s3=$((s1-s2))

echo $s3
-1

echo ${s3#-}
1
2
  • 5
    This is great for getting a positive number out of $(( 2**63 )).
    – ltrainpr
    Apr 12, 2018 at 14:15
  • 1
    I think this point by @ltrainpr is that bash overflows as a signed int at this number: care should be taken whether or not the absolute magnitude is computed. I mean: if you've already overflowed, you've already got a problem.
    – Jack Wasey
    Jun 19, 2022 at 18:40
8
$ s2=5 s1=4
$ echo $s2 $s1
5 4
$ res= expr $s2 - $s1
1
$ echo $res

What's actually happening on the fourth line is that res is being set to nothing and exported for the expr command. Thus, when you run [ "$res" -lt 0 ] res is expanding to nothing and you see the error.

You could just use an arithmetic expression:

$ (( res=s2-s1 ))
$ echo $res
1

Arithmetic context guarantees the result will be an integer, so even if all your terms are undefined to begin with, you will get an integer result (namely zero).

$ (( res = whoknows - whocares )); echo $res
0

Alternatively, you can tell the shell that res is an integer by declaring it as such:

$ declare -i res
$ res=s2-s1

The interesting thing here is that the right hand side of an assignment is treated in arithmetic context, so you don't need the $ for the expansions.

6
  • 2
    @AliSajid no, the error is at if. The problem is before if, when you never actually assign a value to res.
    – kojiro
    Mar 24, 2015 at 1:47
  • 6
    abs $res => ${res/#-/} :)
    – rici
    Mar 24, 2015 at 2:02
  • @rici heh. I thought of that, but ruled it out because OP said by the following code. But yeah…
    – kojiro
    Mar 24, 2015 at 2:08
  • @kojiro $ s2=5 s1=4 $ echo $s2 $s1 5 4 $ res= expr $s1 - $s2 -1 $ echo $res {empty line} Oct 8, 2019 at 8:53
  • Sorry dude) Looks like you answer is outdated. Anyway rici answer helped me: ${VAR1#-} works fine Oct 9, 2019 at 17:40
7

I know this thread is WAY old at this point, but I wanted to share a function I wrote that could help with this:

abs() { 
    [[ $[ $@ ] -lt 0 ]] && echo "$[ ($@) * -1 ]" || echo "$[ $@ ]"
}

This will take any mathematical/numeric expression as an argument and return the absolute value. For instance: abs -4 => 4 or abs 5-8 => 3

1
  • $(( ... )) is the preferred syntax for arithmetic contexts rather than $[ ... ]. And this can be significantly simplified into a single arithmetic context: abs() { echo $(( $1 > 0 ? $1 : -$1 )); }
    – dimo414
    Apr 2, 2023 at 6:37
3

I translated this solution to bash. I like it more than the accepted string manipulation method or other conditionals because it keeps the abs() process inside the mathematical section

abs_x=$(( x * ((x>0) - (x<0)) ))

x=-3
abs_x= -3 * (0-1) = 3

x=4
abs_x= 4 * (1-0) = 4
2

A workaround: try to eliminate the minus sign.

  1. with sed
x=-12
x=$( sed "s/-//" <<< $x )
echo $x

12
  1. Checking the first character with parameter expansion
x=-12
[[ ${x:0:1} = '-' ]] && x=${x:1} || :
echo $x

12

This syntax is a ternary opeartor. The colon ':' is the do-nothing instruction.

  1. or substitute the '-' sign with nothing (again parameter expansion)
x=-12
echo ${x/-/}

12

Personally, scripting bash appears easier to me when I think string-first.

1

The simplest solution:

res="${res/#-}"

Deletes only one / occurrence if - is at the first # character.

1
  • Sure its the simplest solution which is the solution oi the highest rated answer submitted 4+ years before yours ¯_(ツ)_/¯
    – nhed
    Feb 2 at 16:23
1

This simple one works for floating point numbers:

echo "sqrt($var^2)" | bc

2
  • Hey! The solution with variable substitution is the best but yours is nice to implement a abs() function in bc.
    – Stéphane
    Feb 13 at 21:00
  • I wonder if it’s more costly than a "if below zero then multiply by minus one" ?
    – Stéphane
    Feb 13 at 21:10
0

For the purist, assuming bash and a relatively recent one (I tested on 4.2 and 5.1):

abs() {
  declare -i _value
  _value=$1
  (( _value < 0 )) && _value=$(( _value * -1 ))
  printf "%d\n" $_value
}
0

If you don't care about the math and only the result matters, you may use

echo $res | awk -F- '{print $NF}'

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