2

For the following code, which according to the style guide should be wrapped at 80 chars:

opts.on('--scores_min <uint>', Integer, 'Drop reads if a single position in ',
                                        'the index have a quality score ',
                                        'below scores_main (default= ',
                                        "#{DEFAULT_SCORE_MIN})") do |o|
  options[:scores_min] = o
end

The resulting output is:

    --scores_min <uint>          Drop reads if a single position in
                                 the index have a quality score
                                 below scores_main (default=
                                 16)

Which wraps at 72 chars and looks wrong :o(

I really want it wrapped at 80 chars and aligned like this:

    --scores_min <uint>          Drop reads if a single position in the
                                 index have a quality score below
                                 scores_min (default=16)

How can this be achieved in a clever way?

  • 1
    Much of coding is programmer's choice. The style guides are guidelines, not rules. I recommend looking at the code with a critical eye towards readability, and if you're still not sure, have a peer look at it. And read the style guides as they are great for showing us the issues and how to think about writing code for readability. – the Tin Man Apr 9 '16 at 22:27
1

The easiest solution in this case is to stack parameters like this:

opts.on('--scores_min <uint>',
        Integer, 
        "Drop reads if a single position in the ",
        "index have a quality score below ",
        "scores_min (default= #{DEFAULT_SCORE_MIN})") do |o|
  options[:scores_min] = o
end

That results in a fairly pleasant output:

    --scores_min <uint>          Drop reads if a single position in the 
                                 index have a quality score below 
                                 scores_min (default= 16)

More generally, here docs can make it easier to format output strings in a way that looks good both in the code and in the output:

       # Deeply nested code
       puts <<~EOT
            Drop reads if a single position in the 
            index have a quality score below 
            scores_min (default= #{DEFAULT_SCORE_MIN})
       EOT

But in this case it doesn't work so well since the description string is indented automatically.

0

So I think the solution is to follow the Ruby Style Guide:

When using heredocs for multi-line strings keep in mind the fact that they preserve leading whitespace. It's a good practice to employ some margin based on which to trim the excessive whitespace.

code = <<-END.gsub(/^\s+\|/, '')
  |def test
  |  some_method
  |  other_method
  |end
END
# => "def test\n  some_method\n  other_method\nend\n"

[EDIT] In Ruby 2.3 you can do (same ref):

code = <<~END
  def test
    some_method
    other_method
  end
END

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