35

Is there an easy way to test the connectivity to a MS SQL Server instance from a client (without loading any SQL assemblies) with PowerShell?

MS Sql: Servername\Instance Port 1433

How can I test the connectivity to the server with PowerShell from a normal client?

0

4 Answers 4

53

Use the SqlConnection class to test a connection. You don't have to load any SQL assemblies.

Helper function:

function Test-SQLConnection
{    
    [OutputType([bool])]
    Param
    (
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,
                    ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true,
                    Position=0)]
        $ConnectionString
    )
    try
    {
        $sqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection $ConnectionString;
        $sqlConnection.Open();
        $sqlConnection.Close();

        return $true;
    }
    catch
    {
        return $false;
    }
}

Usage example:

Test-SQLConnection "Data Source=localhost;database=myDB;User ID=myUser;Password=myPassword;"
3
  • Return $_.Exception.Message in the catch scope to get the error message. Nov 15, 2017 at 14:20
  • @PawBaltzersen Good point but the cmdlet does explicit return a boolean because it is intended to return true or false whether the test was successfull or not. Most users probably don't care about the actual failure for the test. Nov 15, 2017 at 14:55
  • I know, just thought I'd mention it :) Nov 15, 2017 at 19:18
12

That depends on what you actually want to test. If you just want to verify that you can connect to the port on the remote host something like this will do:

$server = 'servername'
$port   = 1433

$tcp = New-Object Net.Sockets.TcpClient
if ([void]$tcp.Connect($server, $port)) {
  'connected'
} else {
  'not connected'
}
$tcp.Dispose()

If you want to verify that a connection to an SQL Server instance can be established you'll need something like this:

$dbhost = 'servername'
$dbinst = 'instance'
$dbname = 'master'

$username = ...
$password = ...

$cs = "Server=$dbhost\$dbinst;Database=$dbname;User Id=$username;" +
      "Password=$password;"

$cn = New-Object -COM 'ADODB.Connection'
$cn.ConnectionString = $cs
try {
  $cn.Open()
  if ($cn.State -eq 1) {
    'connected'
    $cn.Close()
  } else {
    'not connected'
  }
} catch {
  'not connected'
}
3
  • 6
    On Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2 you can also use the Test-NetConnection cmdlet like so: Test-NetConnection -ComputerName 'servername' -Port 1433 Apr 16, 2015 at 5:21
  • 1
    I tried the script and got an error "Data source name not found and no default driver specified". This was resolved when I added DRIVER={SQL Server} in the connection string.
    – DeeJay007
    Mar 28, 2018 at 8:58
  • To print the exception, use echo $_.Exception.GetType().FullName, $_.Exception.Message in the catch block.
    – DeeJay007
    Apr 5, 2018 at 6:48
12

This is basically the same as Martin's answer, only the connection string is build from the parameters, and the time taken to connect is measured.

e.g:

Test-SQLDatabase -Server SQLServer -Database SomeDB -Username SQLUser -Password password

or

Test-SQLDatabase -Server Server1\SQLExpress -Database SomeDB -UseWindowsAuthentication

.

function Test-SQLDatabase 
{
    param( 
    [Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$True, ValueFromPipeline=$True)] [string] $Server,
    [Parameter(Position=1, Mandatory=$True)] [string] $Database,
    [Parameter(Position=2, Mandatory=$True, ParameterSetName="SQLAuth")] [string] $Username,
    [Parameter(Position=3, Mandatory=$True, ParameterSetName="SQLAuth")] [string] $Password,
    [Parameter(Position=2, Mandatory=$True, ParameterSetName="WindowsAuth")] [switch] $UseWindowsAuthentication
    )

    # connect to the database, then immediatly close the connection. If an exception occurrs it indicates the conneciton was not successful. 
    process { 
        $dbConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
        if (!$UseWindowsAuthentication) {
            $dbConnection.ConnectionString = "Data Source=$Server; uid=$Username; pwd=$Password; Database=$Database;Integrated Security=False"
            $authentication = "SQL ($Username)"
        }
        else {
            $dbConnection.ConnectionString = "Data Source=$Server; Database=$Database;Integrated Security=True;"
            $authentication = "Windows ($env:USERNAME)"
        }
        try {
            $connectionTime = measure-command {$dbConnection.Open()}
            $Result = @{
                Connection = "Successful"
                ElapsedTime = $connectionTime.TotalSeconds
                Server = $Server
                Database = $Database
                User = $authentication}
        }
        # exceptions will be raised if the database connection failed.
        catch {
                $Result = @{
                Connection = "Failed"
                ElapsedTime = $connectionTime.TotalSeconds
                Server = $Server
                Database = $Database
                User = $authentication}
        }
        Finally{
            # close the database connection
            $dbConnection.Close()
            #return the results as an object
            $outputObject = New-Object -Property $Result -TypeName psobject
            write-output $outputObject 
        }
    }
}
0

I've used the ConnectionState enum to check the database connection state.

Documentation on this enum can be found here

It can be accessed with the following: [System.Data.ConnectionState]::Open

Other options are Broken, Closed, Connecting, Executing, and Fetching.

Example:
class Database
{
    [System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection]$Connection

    [void]Connect
    {
        $sqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
        $sqlConnection.ConnectionString = $connectionString
        $sqlConnection.Open()

        $this.Connection = $sqlConnection
    }
    
    [bool]IsConnected
    {
        return $this.Connection.State -eq [System.Data.ConnectionState]::Open
    }
}

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