10

I have a site with a very active background (I'm talking 6 or so different z-indexes here 2 with animations). I wanted a in the foreground that had content but wanted a "window" through to the background in it. Some problems I had:

  1. you can't "punch a hole" in a background, so...

    • I built a containing div, lets call it "srminfo"
    • Inside that I had a "top", "left", "window", "right" and "bottom"
    • the top, left, right, bottom all had opaque white backgrounds
    • while the srminfo and window divs had background:none;
  2. No matter how hard I tried, the "right" div wouldn't fill the space between the "top" and "bottom" divs, I tried a lot of different things. The reason it had to be dynamic is that the text in the "left" div was dynamic based on the background colour, which was itself generated randomly with JavaScript.

How is display: table; and all the other related CSS code like tables? And how can it be used?

  • 4
    Is this a question? If you want to do a Q&A style you should move this to the answer section and edit this so that it's a question. – naththedeveloper Mar 24 '15 at 9:59
  • 5
    I don't think this deserves downvotes. It should've simply been closed, and yet there's only one vote-to-close. Considering Jim is new here, that's quite harsh. (Therefore: +1) StackExchange as a whole is meant to ask questions, and to receive answers. You should always follow that format. If you want to answer your own question, you can - if you follow to proposed format: First ask the question, and then provide the answer in the answer section. But to be sure you are not asking something that's been asked before, use the search box in the upper right. – Bram Vanroy Mar 24 '15 at 10:24
  • 1
    Thanks @Liam - I'll check out the self answering post. I think I did find that question while I was trying to figure out the dispaly: table; code, but was thrown a bit by the (what I realise now is unnecessarily confusing code). The inclusion of the original <table > code in my post may help others - but just give the word and I'll delete this post. Oh dear! Foiled! If you have more than 15 reputation and already know the answer, click the checkbox that says "Answer your own question" at the bottom of the Ask Question page. I guess it doesn't cater for us news. – Jim Mar 24 '15 at 10:28
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    Thanks @BramVanroy, I felt that way too, but willing to bow to the wishes of those that have been here longer than I. Also, I only put up the info once I had the answer. As I had a tough time getting the answer, I wanted to save others the hassle, and felt it silly posting "how do I do this?" when I already had the answer. – Jim Mar 24 '15 at 10:32
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    @Liam So... should I cut the answer out, reword this to be a question, and then "Answer it" with the cut bit, or should I just leave it? – Jim Mar 24 '15 at 11:06
29

After days trying to find the answer, I finally found

display: table;

There was surprisingly very little information available online about how to actually getting it to work, even here, so on to the "How":

To use this fantastic piece of code, you need to think back to when tables were the only real way to structure HTML, namely the syntax. To get a table with 2 rows and 3 columns, you'd have to do the following:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Similarly to get CSS to do it, you'd use the following:

HTML

<div id="table">
    <div class="tr">
        <div class="td"></div>
        <div class="td"></div>
        <div class="td"></div>
    </div>
    <div class="tr">
        <div class="td"></div>
        <div class="td"></div>
        <div class="td"></div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

#table{ 
    display: table; 
}
.tr{ 
    display: table-row; 
}
.td{ 
    display: table-cell; }

As you can see in the JSFiddle example below, the divs in the 3rd column have no content, yet are respecting the auto height set by the text in the first 2 columns. WIN!

http://jsfiddle.net/blyzz/1djs97yv/1/

It's worth noting that display: table; does not work in IE6 or 7 (thanks, FelipeAls), so depending on your needs with regards to browser compatibility, this may not be the answer that you are seeking.

14

It's even easier to use parent > child selector relationship so the inner div do not need to have their css classes to be defined explicitly:

.display-table {
    display: table; 
}
.display-table > div { 
    display: table-row; 
}
.display-table > div > div { 
    display: table-cell;
    padding: 5px;
}
<div class="display-table">
    <div>
        <div>0, 0</div>
        <div>0, 1</div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div>1, 0</div>
        <div>1, 1</div>
    </div>
</div>

3

The display:table family of CSS properties is mostly there so that HTML tables can be defined in terms of them. Because they're so intimately linked to a specific tag structure, they don't see much use beyond that.

If you were going to use these properties in your page, you would need a tag structure that closely mimicked that of tables, even though you weren't actually using the <table> family of tags. A minimal version would be a single container element (display:table), with direct children that can all be represented as rows (display:table-row), which themselves have direct children that can all be represented as cells (display:table-cell). There are other properties that let you mimic other tags in the table family, but they require analogous structures in the HTML. Without this, it's going to be very hard (if not impossible) to make good use of these properties.

2

How (and why) to use display: table-cell (CSS)

I just wanted to mention, since I don't think any of the other answers did directly, that the answer to "why" is: there is no good reason, and you should probably never do this.

In my over a decade of experience in web development, I can't think of a single time I would have been better served to have a bunch of <div>s with display styles than to just have table elements.

The only hypothetical I could come up with is if you have tabular data stored in some sort of non-HTML-table format (eg. a CSV file). In a very specific version of this case it might be easier to just add <div> tags around everything and then add descendent-based styles, instead of adding actual table tags.

But that's an extremely contrived example, and in all real cases I know of simply using table tags would be better.

  • I think there are instances where using display: table; and similar CSS declarations can be quite useful for achieving complex layouts; but I agree that the html table element is almost always the preferred option for tabular data. And even the layout uses for display: table; and friends are becoming much less necessary now that we have flexbox and CSS grids. – Nathan Arthur Nov 5 '18 at 15:34
  • 1
    Could you provide an example of the type of case where display: table would be preferable? – machineghost Nov 5 '18 at 21:50
  • What happens when you try to display the table on a small mobile device? A downside of relying on an HTML tag (table) for layout, is that it may interfere with responsive design. Just a thought - In practice I probably wouldn't use either HTML or CSS table elements in that case, so may not be a good example. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 30 at 23:27

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