1

I am trying to iterate over RGB values, to get a continuously colour plate . Usually ,to iterate over 3 values and get them all, you do it like in binary:

r g b 
0 0 0 
0 0 1
0 1 0

But i have one main issue. We need to get their order to looks continuously so for instance, i go over the reds, than right to the orange, than to the yellow,green, etc.

What algorithm ,or pseudo code should i use to get them in that order ??

See this image attached, how the colors should look like: enter image description here

  • 1
    So stupid, its right there in the image i shows here :) – Curnelious Mar 24 '15 at 10:17
4

Start from 255 0 0, then count up g to 255 255 0, then count down red to 0 255 0, then count up blue to 0 255 255, then count down green to 0 0 225, then count up red to 255 0 255, then count down blue to 255 0 0.

I love this colour scheme :D

  • wow ! thanks ! thats great ! i wonder why physically it works like that ! – Curnelious Mar 24 '15 at 10:13
  • I stared at the numbers for a while and it occured to me :D Accept answ pls! – Thornkey Mar 24 '15 at 10:17
2

Start from HSB or HSL values then convert them to RGB.

As you choose Brightness (B) and Saturation (S) you get what you want by changing continuously the value for Hue (H)

If you google you'll find formulas to do the conversion

  • Thanks but that doesn't mean anything to me. i dont understand actually what to do . – Curnelious Mar 24 '15 at 10:12
  • 1
    dude that's so dishonest, just google it – Guiroux Mar 24 '15 at 10:12
0

What you need is linear interpolation of colours to give that smooth transition from one color to another. I'll give a simple workout for you to understand the math involved.

Red = (1, 0, 0)

Yellow = (1, 1, 0) (lies exactly between red and yellow)

Green = (0, 1, 0)

First interpolate from red to yellow. Since x and z stay the same, the only component to interpolate is y. The smoothness depends on how many stops you make from one extreme to the other. Say we take stops = 4

+------------+------------+
|Red         |(1, 0, 0)   |
+------------+------------+
|            |(1, 0.2, 0) |
+            +------------+
|            |(1, 0.4, 0) |
+  Yellowish +------------+
|     Red    |(1, 0.6, 0) |
+            +------------+
|            |(1, 0.8, 0) |
+------------+------------+
|Yellow      |(1, 1, 0)   |
+------------+------------+
|            |(0.8, 1, 0) |
+            +------------+
|            |(0.6, 1, 0) |
+ Yellowish  +------------+
|   Green    |(0.4, 1, 0) |
+            +------------+
|            |(0.2, 1, 0) |
+------------+------------+
|Green       |(0, 1, 0)   |
+------------+------------+

If you interpolate from Red -> Yellow -> Green -> Cyan -> Blue -> Magenta you'd get a line with one extreme being Red and the other being Magenta.

Now to create the HSV wheel you've posted in your question, one needs to do both radial and axial interpolaton.

Hue (or the actual colour) is radially interpolated i.e. based on the angle. The smoothness (stops) here would be based on angle instead of distance.

+-------+-------+
|Angle° |Colour |
+-------+-------+
|0/360  |Red    |
+-------+-------+
|60     |Yellow |
+-------+-------+
|120    |Green  |
+-------+-------+
|180    |Cyan   |
+-------+-------+
|240    |Blue   |
+-------+-------+
|300    |Magenta|
+-------+-------+

Saturation (vividness) is interpolated radially i.e. based on the point's distance from the centre. The centre is pure white while the point at the circumference is pure colour.

So the line from centre to circumference at angle 0° would start with white (1, 1, 1) at centre and end with pure red (1, 0, 0) at circumference. Do the same for the other angles too (until you circle back to 360/0°) and you'd get the wheel you've posted; it's actually a disc from a greater (HSV) cylinder whose vertical axis would interpolate Lightness (picture in Wikipedia's excellent article linked above).

See code below for a live rendering of a HSV wheel.

         // REFERENCES
         // http://stackoverflow.com/q/10373695
         // http://stackoverflow.com/a/7541756
         // http://tutorials.jenkov.com/html5-canvas/gradients.html
         // Computer Graphics: From Pixels to Programmable Graphics
         // Hardware by Alexey Boreskov, Evgeniy Shikin

         // from rgb_hsv_lerp workout
         function hsv2rgb(h) {
             var s = 1, v = 1;
             while(h < 0) h += 360;
             while(h >= 360) h -= 360;
             h /= 60;
             var i = Math.floor(h);
             var f = h - i;
             var p = v * (1 - s);
             var q = v * (1 - (s * f));
             var t = v * (1 - (s * (1 - f)));
             rgb = [];
             switch(i) {
                 case 0: rgb[0] = v; rgb[1] = t; rgb[2] = p; break;
                 case 1: rgb[0] = q; rgb[1] = v; rgb[2] = p; break;
                 case 2: rgb[0] = p; rgb[1] = v; rgb[2] = t; break;
                 case 3: rgb[0] = p; rgb[1] = q; rgb[2] = v; break;
                 case 4: rgb[0] = t; rgb[1] = p; rgb[2] = v; break;
                 case 5: rgb[0] = v; rgb[1] = p; rgb[2] = q; break;
             }
             return "rgb(" + Math.floor(255 * rgb[0]) + ","
                           + Math.floor(255 * rgb[1]) + ","
                           + Math.floor(255 * rgb[2]) + ")";
         }

         function plot(ctx, x, y, hue) {
             var cx = 0, cy = 0;
             var xs = [x, -y, -x,  y];
             var ys = [y,  x, -y, -x];

             for (var i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
                 // linear gradient from start to end of line
                 var grad = ctx.createLinearGradient(0, 0, xs[i], ys[i]);
                 grad.addColorStop(0, "white");
                 // the canvas coordinate system has Y ↓ while math coordinate
                 // has Y ↑, so flip hue too to match standard HSV wheel
                 grad.addColorStop(1, hsv2rgb(-(hue + (90 * i))));
                 ctx.strokeStyle = grad;
                 ctx.beginPath();
                 ctx.moveTo(cx, cy);
                 ctx.lineTo(xs[i], ys[i]);
                 ctx.stroke();
             }
         }

         function draw() {
             var can = document.getElementById('canvas1');
             var ctx = can.getContext('2d');
             var r = can.clientWidth / 2;

             ctx.translate(r, r);
             ctx.lineWidth = 2;

             var x = r, y = 0;
             plot(ctx, x, y, 0);
             // divide 45° by number of iterations to get iteration delta
             // y starts at 0, iteration ends when y = x i.e. x = y = r / √2
             var hue_delta = 45 / Math.floor(r / Math.sqrt(2));
             // Bresenham's circle drawing algorithm, reference book cited above
             var d = 1.25 - r;
             while (x > y) {
               ++y;
                 if (d < 0)
                     d += (2 * y) + 3;
                 else {
                     d += 2 * (y - x) + 5;
                     --x;
                 }
                 var hue = y * hue_delta;
                 plot(ctx, x, y, hue);
                 plot(ctx, y, x, 90 - hue);
             }
             ctx.translate(-r, -r);
         }
    <body onload="draw()">
        <h1>HSV Colour Wheel</h1>
        <canvas id="canvas1" width="300" height="300" />
    </body>

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