1

I'm little bit confused about handling exceptions within a hierarchy of methods.

Let's say, I've a class Logger in a class library project. Please have a look on the following code-

namespace MyLibrary
{
    public class Logger
    {
        //exposed to other project
        public static void CreateLog(String message)
        {
            try
            {
                WriteInFile(message); //calling the method below
            }
            catch (Exception Ex)
            {
                throw Ex;              
            }
        }

        //private method
        private static void WriteInFile(String message)
        {
            try
            {
                //Writing in a file
            }
            catch (Exception Ex)
            {
                throw Ex;
            }
        }
    }
}

Let's assume, I'm using that library in an ASP.NET MVC project. Code -

namespace MvcProject.Controllers
{
    public class HomeController : Controller
    {
        public ActionResult DoSomething()
        {
            try
            {
                Logger.CreateLog("some text.");
            }
            catch (Exception Ex)
            {
                 //Exception is handled here.
            }

            return View();
        }
    }
}

Hierarchy: DoSomething() -> CreateLog() -> WriteInFile()

All the three methods have try.. catch.. blocks. My questions are-

  • Do I actually need try.. catch in CreateLog() and WriteInFile() method?

  • If I use that in all the methods, does it have any performance impact?

This is a fictitious example to get the problem explained.

It would be more useful for me if you post an answer with a revised code block that you suggest.

Thank you.

  • Don't do that. Depends on whether this is a public facing web site or used internally, like a company's intranet. Do nothing at all if it is an intranet, users will know how to find the guy that takes care of the web server. If it is public then you don't want to be embarrassed, catch the exception in the Logger class and send an urgent email to the admin. And set an IsDead variable so the logger won't be used again. – Hans Passant Mar 24 '15 at 10:59
  • @HansPassant Thank you for your suggestion. But If I want a central exception handling model? Another issue is, Logger may not be dead, but due to some other reason it may throw exception. – s.k.paul Mar 24 '15 at 11:06
  • "central exception handling" is a pipe dream, it does not work. Exceptions need to be handled close to the code that throws the exception, only way you can know how to recover from the mishap. Always keep in mind that 98% of all exceptions are mishaps that you can never handle, only tell a human about. Like this one, you have no idea what terrible thing happened to the machine to make the simple operation of writing a file fail so badly. – Hans Passant Mar 24 '15 at 11:10
5

Do I actually need try.. catch in every method?

No. In fact, it's harming your diagnostics by cutting off the stack trace - you won't be able to see the original full stack trace. You could fix that by just using:

throw;

instead of

throw Ex;

... but basically the try/catch blocks are just adding cruft here. Get rid of them.

If I use that in all the methods, does it have any performance impact?

Only if an exception is thrown - but then it's potentially making it slower by recomputing the stack trace each time. I wouldn't worry about the performance though - worry about readability of code (and the effect on stack traces) first.

  • there are three methods. Which/whose need the change? – s.k.paul Mar 24 '15 at 11:18
  • The first two, at least. Quite possibly the third as well - ideally, have centralized error handling. (Look into MVC configuration for that.) – Jon Skeet Mar 24 '15 at 11:22
1

There is a very small performance hit, when wrapping code in a try,catch structure.

When a method fails to do what it was designed to do, it should throw an exception. This is "a signal" to the caller code, about where stuff went wrong.

It is up to you to catch the thrown exception. to do this, we wrap the code we want to run in a "try" statement, that sets up you code for catching an exception.

The catch block is where the code jumps to, if an exception is thrown. you can do variations of the catch statement, like "only catch a specific type of exception", or catch all exceptions.

You do not need to try/catch inside all functions. Instead we typically throw exceptions from libraries, and let the application programmer set up the try/catch structure. In this way, it is the programmer of the business logic that decides how to handle errors, not the programmer of the library..

you may sometimes want to help application programmers, by handling some errors anyway, this could be stuff like: you library catches an exception with filesystem busy before we panic, we catch the exception and retry a few times, before throwing the exception further up the stream...

It all depends on what type of exception it is.

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