19

How do I select the unique elements from the list {0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5} so that I get {0, 1, 3, 5}, effectively removing all instances of the repeated elements {2, 4}?

  • At least outside of C# (I can't say for C# itself), the starting point isn't really a set if it contains duplicates. It might be a multi-set, or a list, or ... – Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '08 at 16:24
  • Thanks for the correction. I fixed it. – Ozgur Ozcitak Nov 17 '08 at 9:38
31
var numbers = new[] { 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5 };

var uniqueNumbers =
    from n in numbers
    group n by n into nGroup
    where nGroup.Count() == 1
    select nGroup.Key;

// { 0, 1, 3, 5 }
  • OMG. That's fancy. How about HashSet<int> r = new HashSet<int>(numbers); – tymtam Feb 20 '12 at 3:20
  • 2
    @Tymek: The OP wants to remove duplicates, leaving only those numbers which are unique in the original sequence. – Bryan Watts Feb 20 '12 at 4:10
  • I'm lost. The code you provided doesn't modify the original sequence called 'numbers'. – tymtam Mar 1 '12 at 1:36
  • 1
    @Tymek: The OP asked to select the unique numbers, which implies creating a new sequence by examining the existing sequence. – Bryan Watts Mar 1 '12 at 3:11
  • 2
    @Tymek: Very close. It would be {0, 1, 3, 5}, since only 2 and 4 repeat. But I think you get the idea. – Bryan Watts Mar 1 '12 at 5:57
17
var nums = new int{ 0...4,4,5};
var distinct = nums.Distinct();

make sure you're using Linq and .NET framework 3.5.

  • This returns {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} including repeated elements. – Ozgur Ozcitak Nov 15 '08 at 8:24
  • Oh, my mistake. I didn't notice you wanted to remove those duplicate entries. – CVertex Nov 15 '08 at 8:26
12

With lambda..

var all = new[] {0,1,1,2,3,4,4,4,5,6,7,8,8}.ToList();
var unique = all.GroupBy(i => i).Where(i => i.Count() == 1).Select(i=>i.Key);
10

C# 2.0 solution:

static IEnumerable<T> GetUniques<T>(IEnumerable<T> things)
{
    Dictionary<T, int> counts = new Dictionary<T, int>();

    foreach (T item in things)
    {
        int count;
        if (counts.TryGetValue(item, out count))
            counts[item] = ++count;
        else
            counts.Add(item, 1);
    }

    foreach (KeyValuePair<T, int> kvp in counts)
    {
        if (kvp.Value == 1)
            yield return kvp.Key;
    }
}
  • This will throw a KeyNotFoundException – David Wengier Nov 17 '08 at 9:46
  • 1
    This works but you need to change counts[item]++; into if (counts.ContainsKey(item)) counts[item]++; else counts.Add(item, 1); – Ozgur Ozcitak Dec 23 '08 at 9:27
  • 1
    Fixed. Teach me to write code without seeing if it compiles! – Matt Howells Jul 6 '09 at 9:20
8

Here is another way that works if you have complex type objects in your List and want to get the unique values of a property:

var uniqueValues= myItems.Select(k => k.MyProperty)
                  .GroupBy(g => g)
                  .Where(c => c.Count() == 1)
                  .Select(k => k.Key)
                  .ToList();

Or to get distinct values:

var distinctValues = myItems.Select(p => p.MyProperty)
                            .Distinct()
                            .ToList();

If your property is also a complex type you can create a custom comparer for the Distinct(), such as Distinct(OrderComparer), where OrderComparer could look like:

public class OrderComparer : IEqualityComparer<Order>
{
    public bool Equals(Order o1, Order o2)
    {
        return o1.OrderID == o2.OrderID;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Order obj)
    {
        return obj.OrderID.GetHashCode();
    }
}
  • 1
    i liked this better. shorter and easier to read (subjective?) with the lamba expressions. – Bahamut Jul 26 '12 at 8:41
  • @EwaldStieger, he doesn't want to leave a single instance for every value, he wants to REMOVE ALL THE INSTANCES of the values that are present more than 1 time. So how the Distinct() can achieve this? (I'm surprised of the 8 upvotes since your answer doesn't resolve the issue correctly.) – Massimiliano Kraus Oct 26 '16 at 18:07
  • @MassimilianoKraus Yes you are correct. I missed that in my original answer and have updated it now – Ewald Stieger Oct 28 '16 at 6:57
3

If Linq isn't available to you because you have to support legacy code that can't be upgraded, then declare a Dictionary, where the first int is the number and the second int is the number of occurences. Loop through your List, loading up your Dictionary. When you're done, loop through your Dictionary selecting only those elements where the number of occurences is 1.

3

I believe Matt meant to say:

 static IEnumerable<T> GetUniques<T>(IEnumerable<T> things)
 {
     Dictionary<T, bool> uniques = new Dictionary<T, bool>();
     foreach (T item in things)
     {
         if (!(uniques.ContainsKey(item)))
         {
             uniques.Add(item, true);
         }
     }
     return uniques.Keys;
 }
  • This is the .NET 2.0 version of what CVertex posted. It also returns the duplicate elements. – Ozgur Ozcitak Dec 23 '08 at 9:26
  • If you could downvote your own posts I would. – Robert Rossney Dec 27 '08 at 20:58
  • Well, you can delete 'em. – Frederick The Fool Jan 16 '09 at 13:01
  • No, I prefer leaving them (as the French said the English occasionally shot an admiral) pour encourager l'autres. – Robert Rossney Jan 19 '09 at 10:19
2

There are many ways to skin a cat, but HashSet seems made for the task here.

var numbers = new[] { 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5 };

HashSet<int> r = new HashSet<int>(numbers);

foreach( int i in r ) {
    Console.Write( "{0} ", i );
}

The output:

0 1 2 3 4 5

  • Thank you but I wanted to remove all instances of duplicate elements from the original list, eg. {0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3} -> {0, 3} – Ozgur Ozcitak Feb 20 '12 at 16:05
  • As in it's a object of class List which you want to modify? – tymtam Mar 1 '12 at 1:34
  • Aaa... I got you now! – tymtam Mar 1 '12 at 5:54
0

In .Net 2.0 I`m pretty sure about this solution:

public IEnumerable<T> Distinct<T>(IEnumerable<T> source)
{
     List<T> uniques = new List<T>();
     foreach (T item in source)
     {
         if (!uniques.Contains(item)) uniques.Add(item);
     }
     return uniques;
}
  • But this method adds every present value. He doesn't want this. He wants the duplicated values to be COMPLETELY REMOVED. – Massimiliano Kraus Oct 26 '16 at 18:09

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