3

I am using tSQLt to unit test t-sql code.

Quite often the Arrange part of tests is quite extensive and I am trying to push a lot of it out to the SetUp procedure to reuse among the tests within the class.

It would be very useful if Setup and test procedures could "know" the same information, i.e. have some shared data. For example, let's say setup creates a test invoice and sets invoice ID to something known:

CREATE PROCEDURE [InvoiceManager].[SetUp]
AS
  DECLARE @TestId INT = 10;

  EXEC tsqlt.FakeTable @SchemaName='dbo', @TableName='Invoice';
  INSERT INTO dbo.Invoice (Id, Amount) VALUES (@TestId, 20.50);
GO

And then in the test we want to do something to the test invoice, like so:

CREATE PROCEDURE [InvoiceManager].[Test_InvoiceHandler]
AS
  DECLARE @TestId INT = 10; -- duplication I would like to eliminate

  -- Action
  EXEC dbo.InvoiceHandler @InvoiceId = @TestId;

  -- Assert
  -- ... some assertions
GO

Would be nice to be able to replace duplicating the @TestId's value in both (and more) procedures by just pushing it into some "class variable" in SetUp procedure and then use it from the tests. Any ideas how to achieve it in a compact manner? I could imagine creating a table in [InvoiceManager] schema and reading from it in tests. Any chance something like this exists just that I can't find it in the docu? Thanks!

2 Answers 2

6

One approach would be to change how you do your setup. Instead of defining the 'Arrange' data in the SetUp procedure, you could create a new procedure on your test schema. For example, InvoiceManager.Arrange. This procedure could take your @TestId as an input parameter. You would then call InvoiceManager.Arrange from each of your test procedures. I use this technique quite often instead of using SetUp and find it works quite well. Even though I need to explicitly call it from each test procedure, I find that I can break up my Arrange step into multiple, well-named stored procedures if it is complex.

Here's an example to illustrate how I would solve your question:

CREATE PROCEDURE [InvoiceManager].[Arrange]
  @TestId INT
AS
  EXEC tsqlt.FakeTable @SchemaName='dbo', @TableName='Invoice';
  INSERT INTO dbo.Invoice (Id, Amount) VALUES (@TestId, 20.50);
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE [InvoiceManager].[Test_InvoiceHandler]
AS
  DECLARE @TestId INT = 10;
  EXEC InvoiceManager.Arrange @TestId;

  -- Action
  EXEC dbo.InvoiceHandler @InvoiceId = @TestId;

  -- Assert
  -- ... some assertions
GO
2

Don't forget you can also leverage output parameters in Dennis's Arrange procedure

Another, slightly more involved approach is to take advantage of the Test Data Builder pattern which is a long established approach in the compiled code world but seems less commonly used for databases.

The principle here is that you create a number of test helpers to hand off responsibility for creation of valid key entities. Each builder procedure should be capable of creating a valid object (i.e. row) including, optionally, any dependencies. This can then be used across many unit tests supplying or retrieving only the values required for that test.

In my example below, the InvoiceBuilder will add a valid row to the dbo.Invoice table, even creating a new Customer where required (there is a foreign key from Invoice to Customer). InvoiceBuilder then provides all those values as outputs.

This means that a unit test can create one or more invoices providing only the details needed for that test and/or collecting any resulting values required for the test.

This might look like a lot of code initially but by the time you have 20 or 30 or more unit tests that all need to create invoice(s) as part of the "arrange" step this can save a lot of time. It also adds a real advantage where if for example, we add a new NOT NULL column to the dbo.Invoice table we only need to refeactor InvoiceBuilder and not umpteen tests. Admittedly, tSQLt.FakeTable means that we may be able to avoid some of this refactoring but that is not always the case.

I have used a little artistic license in terms of the actual tests when compared to the original question to better illustrate my thoughts. We have a scalar function called dbo.InvoiceTotalOutstanding() which returns the total amount outstanding for all invoices for a given customer. This could just as easily be a column in the result set of a procedure or view but is easier to demonstrate the tests with a scalar value.

So in the example below, we have [TestHelpers].[InvoiceBuilder] which will guarantee a valid Invoice row (including creation of the dependent Customer row if necessary).

create procedure [TestHelpers].[InvoiceBuilder]
(
  @InvoiceDate datetime = null out
, @InvoiceName varchar(max) = null out
, @InvoiceAmount decimal(18,4) = null out
, @InvoiceIsSettled bit = null out
, @CustomerId int = null out
, @InvoiceId int = null out
, @DoBuildDependencies bit = 1
)
as
begin
    --! If an Invoice ID has been supplied and exists just return those values
    if exists (select 1 from dbo.Invoice where InvoiceId = @InvoiceId)
        begin
            select
                  @InvoiceDate = InvoiceDate
                , @InvoiceName = InvoiceName
                , @InvoiceAmount = InvoiceAmount
                , @InvoiceIsSettled = InvoiceIsSettled
                , @CustomerId = CustomerId
            from
                dbo.Invoice
            where
                InvoiceId = @InvoiceId

            goto EndEx;
        end

    --! If we get here, there is no invoice so create one making sure any required values are valid

    --! Always use the supplied values where present
    set @InvoiceDate = coalesce(@InvoiceDate, '20101010 10:10:10') ; -- use some standard fixed date
    set @InvoiceName = coalesce(@InvoiceName, '') -- use the simplest value to meet any domain constraints
    set @InvoiceAmount = coalesce(@InvoiceAmount, 1.0) -- use the simplest value to meet any domain constraints
    set @InvoiceIsSettled = coalesce(@InvoiceIsSettled, 0) ;

    --! We use other Test Data Builders to create any dependencies
    if @DoBuildDependencies = 1
        begin
            --! CustomerBuilder will ensure that the specified customer exists
            --! or create one if @CustomerId is not specified or present.
            --! Use an output parameter to ensure @CustomerId is valid
            exec TestDataBuilders.CustomerBuilder @CustomerId = @CustomerId out ;
        end

    --! Now we are ready to create our new invoice with a set of valid values
    --! NB: For this example we assume that the real Invoice.InvoiceId has IDENTITY() property

    --! At this point in the code, we don't know whether we are inserting to the real table
    --! which auto-increments or a mocked table created with tSQLt.FakeTable without IDENTITY
    if objectproperty(object_id(N'[dbo].[Invoice]'), N'TableHasIdentity') = 1
        begin
            insert dbo.Invoice
            (
              InvoiceDate
            , InvoiceName
            , InvoiceAmount
            , InvoiceIsSettled
            , CustomerId
            )
            values
            (
              @InvoiceDate
            , @InvoiceName
            , @InvoiceAmount
            , @InvoiceIsSettled
            , @CustomerId
            )

            set @InvoiceId = scope_identity();
        end
    else
        begin
            --! Get a valid Invoice ID that isn't already in use
            set @InvoiceId = coalesce(@InvoiceId, (select max (InvoiceId) from dbo.Invoice) + 1, 1);

            insert dbo.Invoice
            (
              InvoiceId
            , InvoiceDate
            , InvoiceName
            , InvoiceAmount
            , InvoiceIsSettled
            , CustomerId
            )
            values
            (
              @InvoiceId
            , @InvoiceDate
            , @InvoiceName
            , @InvoiceAmount
            , @InvoiceIsSettled
            , @CustomerId
            )
        end

--/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
EndEx:
--/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    return;
end
go

We have an Arranger procedure [InvoiceManagerTests].[ArrangeMultipleInvoices] which creates a customer and multiple invoices.

create procedure [InvoiceManagerTests].[ArrangeMultipleInvoices]
(
  @CustomerId int = null out
, @InvoiceIdA int = null out
, @InvoiceDateA datetime = null out
, @InvoiceNameA varchar(max) = null out
, @InvoiceAmountA decimal(18,4) = null out
, @InvoiceIsSettledA bit = null out
, @InvoiceIdB int = null out
, @InvoiceDateB datetime = null out
, @InvoiceNameB varchar(max) = null out
, @InvoiceAmountB decimal(18,4) = null out
, @InvoiceIsSettledB bit = null out
)
as
begin
    --! Create/validate our Customer
    exec TestDataBuilders.CustomerBuilder @CustomerId = @CustomerId out ;

    --! Create the Invoices
    --! Using the Test Data Builder pattern means that our tests only need to specify
    --! the values of interest
    exec TestHelpers.InvoiceBuilder
          @InvoiceDate = @InvoiceDateA out
        , @InvoiceName = @InvoiceNameA out
        , @InvoiceAmount = @InvoiceAmountA out
        , @InvoiceIsSettled = @InvoiceIsSettledA out
        , @CustomerId = @CustomerIdA out
        , @InvoiceId = @InvoiceIdA out

    exec TestHelpers.InvoiceBuilder
          @InvoiceDate = @InvoiceDateB out
        , @InvoiceName = @InvoiceNameB out
        , @InvoiceAmount = @InvoiceAmountB out
        , @InvoiceIsSettled = @InvoiceIsSettledB out
        , @CustomerId = @CustomerIdB out
        , @InvoiceId = @InvoiceIdB out
end
go

The InvoiceManagerTests class has a very simple Setup method which just isolates the tables affected by this test example.

create procedure [InvoiceManagerTests].[Setup]
as
begin
    exec tSQLt.FakeTable 'dbo.Customer'
    exec tSQLt.FakeTable 'dbo.Invoice'
end
go

Our first test, [Test InvoiceTotalOutstanding for all invoices] checks that in the case of multiple invoices the value returned is correctly summed. Note that when we call [InvoiceManagerTests].[ArrangeMultipleInvoices] we only input the two invoice amounts and collect the Customer ID as an output which we then use as the input for the dbo.InvoiceTotalOutstanding() function.

create procedure [InvoiceManagerTests].[Test InvoiceTotalOutstanding for all invoices]
as
begin
    --! To test that Invoice values are correctly aggregated
    --! we only need to specify each invoice value and let
    --! [InvoiceManagerTests].[ArrangeMultipleInvoices] take care of the rest

    --! Arrange 
    declare @CustomerId int
    declare @InvoiceAmountA decimal(18,4) = 5.50;
    declare @InvoiceAmountB decimal(18,4) = 6.70;
    --! Expected value should be Amount A + Amount B
    declare @ExpectedInvoiceAmount decimal(18,4) = 12.20;

    exec InvoiceManagerTests.ArrangeMultipleInvoices
          @CustomerId = @CustomerId out
        , @InvoiceAmountA = @InvoiceAmountA out
        , @InvoiceAmountB = @InvoiceAmountB out

    --! Act
    declare @ActualValue decimal(18,2) = dbo.InvoiceTotalOutstanding(@CustomerId)

    --! Assert that InvoiceTotalOutstanding column returned by module
    --! matches the expected values
    exec tSQLt.AssertEquals @ExpectedInvoiceAmount, @ActualValue ;
end
go

In our second test, [Test InvoiceTotalOutstanding excludes settled invoices] we check that only outstanding invoices are included in the total. The inputs we supply to [ArrangeMultipleInvoices] are the same except that we specify that one of the invoices should be marked as settled.

create procedure [InvoiceManagerTests].[Test InvoiceTotalOutstanding excludes settled invoices]
as
begin
    --! To test that Invoice Total excludes Settled invoices
    --! we only need to specify each invoice value and set one invoice as Settled
    --! then let [InvoiceManagerTests].[ArrangeMultipleInvoices] take care of the rest

    --! Arrange 
    declare @CustomerId int
    declare @InvoiceAmountA decimal(18,4) = 5.50;
    declare @InvoiceAmountB decimal(18,4) = 6.70;
    --! Expected value should be Amount A only as Invoice B is Settled
    declare @ExpectedInvoiceAmount decimal(18,4) = 5.5;

    exec InvoiceManagerTests.ArrangeMultipleInvoices
          @CustomerId = @CustomerId out
        , @InvoiceAmountA = @InvoiceAmountA out
        , @InvoiceAmountB = @InvoiceAmountB out
        , @InvoiceIsSettledB = 1

    --! Act
    declare @ActualValue decimal(18,2) = dbo.InvoiceTotalOutstanding(@CustomerId)

    --! Assert that InvoiceTotalOutstanding column returned by module
    --! matches the expected values
    exec tSQLt.AssertEquals @ExpectedInvoiceAmount, @ActualValue ;
end
go

This combination of Test Data Builders and class Arrangers (with outputs) is a pattern I use extensively and, where there are a lot of tests around the same set of tables saves me a lot of time both in creating and maintaining my tests.

I blogged about using the Test Data Builder pattern for database unit testing some years back.

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