15

Background

I'm working on a symmetric rounding class and I find that I'm stuck with regards to how to best find the number at position x that I will be rounding. I'm sure there is an efficient mathematical way to find the single digit and return it without having to resort to string parsing.

Problem

Suppose, I have the following (C#) psuedo-code:

var position = 3;
var value = 102.43587m;
// I want this no ↑ (that is 5)

protected static int FindNDigit(decimal value, int position)
{
    // This snippet is what I am searching for
}

Also, it is worth noting that if my value is a whole number, I will need to return a zero for the result of FindNDigit.

Does anyone have any hints on how I should approach this problem? Is this something that is blaringly obvious that I'm missing?

3
  • 4
    You shouldn't be using "var"'s like that. If you know that it is a decimal you should specify it right when you are declaring. Commented May 27, 2010 at 17:55
  • 7
    @VoodooChild I think thats subjective, i mean they are int and decimals in the final code.. I take it more as style.. and style-wise, well everybody has its own preference. by the way, awesome use of the ↑ up arrow! Commented May 27, 2010 at 17:59
  • 3
    I don't use vars for primitive types because it is a subjective choice, I use vars for all other types though. Commented May 27, 2010 at 18:07

7 Answers 7

29
(int)(value * Math.Pow(10, position)) % 10
8
  • 2
    You should strip off the digits to the left of "position" first to avoid unnecessary overflows.
    – mbeckish
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 17:57
  • @mbeckish it is enough for simple cases. for complex you have to do it in loop, multiply and strip
    – Andrey
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 17:59
  • Math.Pow() returns the type double and that upsets the compiler a bit. Besides, casting decimal to an int is really bad idea. Aren't You missing a pair of parenthesis? Commented May 27, 2010 at 18:49
  • @mbeckish, Andrey: Would it not also be possible to just ignore overflow in this case? As long as you aren't modifying value itself, there's no reason you'd need to worry about the lost data there. @Maciej Hehl: How does this look? decimal.Floor(value * Math.Pow(10, position)) % 10
    – JAB
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 19:28
  • @Maciej - the cast to int gets rid of any extra numbers to the right of the decimal point after shifting; they're not needed.
    – SethO
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 19:31
25

How about:

(int)(double(value) * Math.Pow(10, position)) % 10

Basically you multiply by 10 ^ pos in order to move that digit to the one's place, and then you use the modulus operator % to divide out the rest of the number.

4
  • 6
    +1 for including an explanation :). I'm sure the code would include this as a comment.
    – Daniel
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 18:37
  • I like how both simple answers are EXACTLY the same. Creepy.
    – Rubys
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 19:32
  • With value = 10 and position = 1, this returns 0 :( Commented Dec 17, 2012 at 13:22
  • To get the last digit: value % 10 Commented Mar 19, 2014 at 0:24
5
using System;

public static class DecimalExtensions
{
    public static int DigitAtPosition(this decimal number, int position)
    {
        if (position <= 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Position must be positive.");
        }

        if (number < 0)
        {
            number = Math.Abs(number);
        }

        number -= Math.Floor(number);

        if (number == 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        if (position == 1)
        {
            return (int)(number * 10);
        }

        return (number * 10).DigitAtPosition(position - 1);
    }
}

Edit: If you wish, you may separate the recursive call from the initial call, to remove the initial conditional checks during recursion:

using System;

public static class DecimalExtensions
{
    public static int DigitAtPosition(this decimal number, int position)
    {
        if (position <= 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Position must be positive.");
        }

        if (number < 0)
        {
            number = Math.Abs(number);
        }

        return number.digitAtPosition(position);
    }

    static int digitAtPosition(this decimal sanitizedNumber, int validPosition)
    {
        sanitizedNumber -= Math.Floor(sanitizedNumber);

        if (sanitizedNumber == 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        if (validPosition == 1)
        {
            return (int)(sanitizedNumber * 10);
        }

        return (sanitizedNumber * 10).digitAtPosition(validPosition - 1);
    }

Here's a few tests:

using System;
using Xunit;

public class DecimalExtensionsTests
{
                         // digit positions
                         // 1234567890123456789012345678
    const decimal number = .3216879846541681986310378765m;

    [Fact]
    public void Throws_ArgumentException_if_position_is_zero()
    {
        Assert.Throws<ArgumentException>(() => number.DigitAtPosition(0));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Throws_ArgumentException_if_position_is_negative()
    {
        Assert.Throws<ArgumentException>(() => number.DigitAtPosition(-5));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Works_for_1st_digit()
    {
        Assert.Equal(3, number.DigitAtPosition(1));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Works_for_28th_digit()
    {
        Assert.Equal(5, number.DigitAtPosition(28));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Works_for_negative_decimals()
    {
        const decimal negativeNumber = -number;
        Assert.Equal(5, negativeNumber.DigitAtPosition(28));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Returns_zero_for_whole_numbers()
    {
        const decimal wholeNumber = decimal.MaxValue;
        Assert.Equal(0, wholeNumber.DigitAtPosition(1));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Returns_zero_if_position_is_greater_than_the_number_of_decimal_digits()
    {
        Assert.Equal(0, number.DigitAtPosition(29));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Does_not_throw_if_number_is_max_decimal_value()
    {
        Assert.DoesNotThrow(() => decimal.MaxValue.DigitAtPosition(1));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Does_not_throw_if_number_is_min_decimal_value()
    {
        Assert.DoesNotThrow(() => decimal.MinValue.DigitAtPosition(1));
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Does_not_throw_if_position_is_max_integer_value()
    {
        Assert.DoesNotThrow(() => number.DigitAtPosition(int.MaxValue));
    }
}
4
  • What does this solution cover that the others do not? Does it deal with edge cases?
    – Elijah
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 20:26
  • Yes, it should deal with all edge cases. The most upvoted answer deals with too few values before overflowing, IMO.
    – xofz
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 20:49
  • (not to mention it doesn't compile)
    – xofz
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 22:15
  • Accepted because this solution deals with real-world edge cases.
    – Elijah
    Commented May 28, 2010 at 16:57
2

Edited: Totally had the wrong and opposite answer here. I was calculating the position to the left of the decimal instead of the right. See the upvoted answers for the correct code.

2
  • yeah, did you try to run it? remainder (%) doesn't work with double.
    – Andrey
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 18:15
  • My mistake. I quickly ran it in VS2010 interactive and used integer instead of decimal. I'll see if Math.DivRem() will work.
    – JasDev
    Commented May 27, 2010 at 18:19
2

I found this one here working:

public int ValueAtPosition(int value, int position)
{
    var result = value / (int)Math.Pow(10, position);
    result = result % 10;
    return result;
}

And also this one to know the full value (i.e.: 111, position 3 = 100 , sorry I don't know the proper name):

public int FullValueAtPosition(int value, int position)
{
    return this.ValueAtPosition(value, position) * (int)Math.Pow(10, position);
}
0
0

How about this:

protected static int FindNDigit(decimal value, int position)
{
    var index = value.ToString().IndexOf(".");
    position = position + index;
    return (int)Char.GetNumericValue(value.ToString(), position);
}
1
  • Yep. Missed that constraint. :( Commented May 27, 2010 at 18:19
0

None of the previous solutions worked for me, so here is a working one :

var result = value / Math.Pow(10, Math.Truncate((Math.Log10(value) + 1) - position)); return (int)(result % 10);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.