55

I want to replace the following code using java8 Optional:

public Obj getObjectFromDB() {
    Obj obj = dao.find();
    if (obj != null) {
        obj.setAvailable(true);
    } else {
        logger.fatal("Object not available");
    }

    return obj;
}

The following pseudocode does not work as there is no orElseRun method, but anyways it illustrates my purpose:

public Optional<Obj> getObjectFromDB() {
    Optional<Obj> obj = dao.find();
    return obj.ifPresent(obj.setAvailable(true)).orElseRun(logger.fatal("Object not available"));
}
  • What are you wanting to return from the method if there isn't an object present? – Duncan Jones Mar 24 '15 at 15:11
  • I'd want to return Optional always as indicated by the method return parameter. – membersound Mar 24 '15 at 15:17
86

With Java 9 or higher, ifPresentOrElse is most likely what you want:

Optional<> opt = dao.find();

opt.ifPresentOrElse(obj -> obj.setAvailable(true),
                    () -> logger.error("…"));

Currying using vavr or alike might get even neater code, but I haven't tried yet.

  • 30
    seems like something that should have been included in v1 (Java 8)... oh well... – ycomp Dec 25 '16 at 3:55
  • 2
    Yes... I also think they actually missed that in Java 8. And more... if you want to do something when the value is present, they gave "ifPresent()". If you want to do something when the value is present and other thing when it's not, they gave "ifPresentOrElse(f1, f2)". But it still lacks if I only want to do something with it's not present (something like "ifNotPresent()" would be suitable). With ifPresentOrElse I'm forced to use a present function that does nothing in the later case. – hbobenicio Jun 21 '17 at 20:19
  • If you can introduce a framework, have a look at Vavr (former Javaslang) and their Option, it has an onEmpty method – Andreas Jun 22 '17 at 13:22
  • Rather use Java 9 or use if, else. vavr is not very nice – senseiwu Dec 11 '18 at 14:50
33

I don't think you can do it in a single statement. Better do:

if (!obj.isPresent()) {
    logger.fatal(...);   
} else {
    obj.get().setAvailable(true);
}
return obj;
  • 30
    This may be the right answer, but in what way is this superior to null checks? From my point of view it is worse without an orElse.... – DaRich Mar 30 '17 at 5:00
  • 3
    @DaRich, you can forget about the null in the middle of your code, what results in the NPE. But you can't ignore an Optional by accident, it's always an explicit (and dangerous) decision. – Dherik Apr 25 '18 at 16:18
10

You will have to split this into multiple statements. Here is one way to do that:

if (!obj.isPresent()) {
  logger.fatal("Object not available");
}

obj.ifPresent(o -> o.setAvailable(true));
return obj;

Another way (possibly over-engineered) is to use map:

if (!obj.isPresent()) {
  logger.fatal("Object not available");
}

return obj.map(o -> {o.setAvailable(true); return o;});

If obj.setAvailable conveniently returns obj, then you can simply the second example to:

if (!obj.isPresent()) {
  logger.fatal("Object not available");
}

return obj.map(o -> o.setAvailable(true));
9

First of all, your dao.find() should either return an Optional<Obj> or you will have to create one.

e.g.

Optional<Obj> = dao.find();

or you can do it yourself like:

Optional<Obj> = Optional.ofNullable(dao.find());

this one will return Optional<Obj> if present or Optional.empty() if not present.

So now let's get to the solution,

public Obj getObjectFromDB() {
   return Optional.ofNullable(dao.find()).flatMap(ob -> {
            ob.setAvailable(true);
            return Optional.of(ob);    
        }).orElseGet(() -> {
            logger.fatal("Object not available");
            return null;
        });
    }

This is the one liner you're looking for :)

  • 9
    Returning a null defeats the purpose of Optionals. In the OPs question, what one must do if the object is not found is ambiguous. IMHO its better to return a newly instantiated Object, and perhaps setAvailable to false. Of course, here the OP has logged fatal, which means he probably intends to terminate so it doesn't really matter. – Somaiah Kumbera Apr 28 '16 at 8:37
  • This solution returns an Object, while the original question is for a method returning Optional<Object>. My (older) answer is very similar but differs in this way : stackoverflow.com/a/36681079/3854962 – UTF_or_Death Feb 21 '17 at 16:54
  • Why the use of flatMap? – Lino Jul 17 '18 at 6:04
  • because he's returning an optional instead of a value. FlatMap converts Optional<Optional<X>> to Optional<X> – Aman Garg Aug 29 '18 at 14:13
4

There is an .orElseRun method, but it is called .orElseGet, the problem is that, unlike .map, .isPresent doesn't return an Optional<Obj>.

If you really want to do this in one statement this is possible:

public Obj getObjectFromDB() {
    return dao.find()
        .map( obj -> { 
            obj.setAvailable(true);
            return Optional.of(obj); 
         })
        .orElseGet( () -> {
            logger.fatal("Object not available"); 
            return Optional.empty();
    });
}

But this is even clunkier than what you had before.

4

For Java 8 Spring offers ifPresentOrElse from "Utility methods to work with Optionals" to achieve what you want. Example would be:

import static org.springframework.data.util.Optionals.ifPresentOrElse;    

ifPresentOrElse(dao.find(), obj -> obj.setAvailable(true), () -> logger.fatal("Object not available"));
0

You need Optional.isPresent() and orElse(). Your snippet won;t work because it doesn't return anything if not present.

The point of Optional is to return it from the method.

0

I was able to came up with a couple of "one line" solutions, for example:

    obj.map(o -> (Runnable) () -> o.setAvailable(true))
       .orElse(() -> logger.fatal("Object not available"))
       .run();

or

    obj.map(o -> (Consumer<Object>) c -> o.setAvailable(true))
       .orElse(o -> logger.fatal("Object not available"))
       .accept(null);

or

    obj.map(o -> (Supplier<Object>) () -> {
            o.setAvailable(true);
            return null;
    }).orElse(() () -> {
            logger.fatal("Object not available")
            return null;
    }).get();

It doesn't look very nice, something like orElseRun would be much better, but I think that option with Runnable is acceptable if you really want one line solution.

-2

I suppose you cannot change the dao.find() method to return an instance of Optional<Obj>, so you have to create the appropriate one yourself.

The following code should help you out. I've create the class OptionalAction, which provides the if-else mechanism for you.

public class OptionalTest
{
  public static Optional<DbObject> getObjectFromDb()
  {
    // doa.find()
    DbObject v = find();

    // create appropriate Optional
    Optional<DbObject> object = Optional.ofNullable(v);

    // @formatter:off
    OptionalAction.
    ifPresent(object)
    .then(o -> o.setAvailable(true))
    .elseDo(o -> System.out.println("Fatal! Object not available!"));
    // @formatter:on
    return object;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    Optional<DbObject> object = getObjectFromDb();
    if (object.isPresent())
      System.out.println(object.get());
    else
      System.out.println("There is no object!");
  }

  // find may return null
  public static DbObject find()
  {
    return (Math.random() > 0.5) ? null : new DbObject();
  }

  static class DbObject
  {
    private boolean available = false;

    public boolean isAvailable()
    {
      return available;
    }

    public void setAvailable(boolean available)
    {
      this.available = available;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
      return "DbObject [available=" + available + "]";
    }
  }

  static class OptionalAction
  {
    public static <T> IfAction<T> ifPresent(Optional<T> optional)
    {
      return new IfAction<>(optional);
    }

    private static class IfAction<T>
    {
      private final Optional<T> optional;

      public IfAction(Optional<T> optional)
      {
        this.optional = optional;
      }

      public ElseAction<T> then(Consumer<? super T> consumer)
      {
        if (optional.isPresent())
          consumer.accept(optional.get());
        return new ElseAction<>(optional);
      }
    }

    private static class ElseAction<T>
    {
      private final Optional<T> optional;

      public ElseAction(Optional<T> optional)
      {
        this.optional = optional;
      }

      public void elseDo(Consumer<? super T> consumer)
      {
        if (!optional.isPresent())
          consumer.accept(null);
      }
    }
  }
}
  • Please leave a comment, if you vote down. This helps me to improve the answer. – mike Mar 24 '15 at 15:31
  • I agree downvoter should comment here. I assume this is because I was looking to refactor java7 to java8 code, whereas the old code consisted of 8 lines. And if I would replace it with your suggestion that would not help anybody, but just make things worse. – membersound Mar 24 '15 at 16:00
  • I don't understand your point. I did refactor java 7 to 8, didn't I? And to what extend would it make things worse? I don't see any flaws in this solution. One could argue whether the whole point of having an else (or a workaround) on Optional makes sense. But I correctly answered your question and provided a working example. – mike Mar 24 '15 at 16:08
  • Your solution seems totally valid to me, mike. Anyways introducing explicit classes like OptionalAction as a workaround for being able to port the code to java8 seems a bit overengineered, if in java7 this is already only a few liner. – membersound Mar 24 '15 at 16:18
  • 1
    Optional<DbObject> object = (v == null) ? Optional.empty() : Optional.of(v); may be rewritten to: Optional<DbObject> object = Optional.ofNullable(v); – Geir Aug 12 '15 at 13:26

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