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I want to install a driver for Ros (robot operating system), and I have two options the binary install and the compile and install from source. I would like to know which installation is better, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of each one.

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Source: AKA sourcecode, usually in some sort of tarball or zip file. This is RAW programming language code. You need some sort of compiler (javac for java, gcc for c++, etc.) to create the executable that your computer then runs.

Advantages:

  • You can see what the source code is which means....
  • You can edit the end result program to behave differently
  • Depending on what you're doing, when you compile, you could enable certain optimizations that will work on your machine and ONLY your machine (or one EXACTLY like it). For instance, for some sort of gfx rendering software, you could compile it to enable GPU support, which would increase the rendering speed.
  • You can create a version of an application for a different OS/Chipset (see Binary below)

Disadvantages:

  • You have to have your compiler installed
  • You need to manually install all required libraries, which frequently also need to be compiled (and THEIR libraries need to be installed, etc.) This can easily turn a quick 30-second command into a multi-hour project.
  • There are any number of things that could go wrong, and if you're not familiar with what the various errors mean, finding support online could be quite difficult.

Binary: This is the actual program that runs. This is the executable that gets created when you compile from source. They typically have all necessary libraries built into them, or install/deploy them as necessary (depending on how the application was written).

Advantages:

  • It's ready-to-run. If you have a binary designed for your processor and operating system, then chances are you can run the program and everything will work the first time.
  • Less configuration. You don't have to set up a whole bunch of configuration options to use the program; it just uses a generic default configuration.
  • If something goes wrong, it should be a little easier to find help online, since the binary is pre-compiled....other people may be using it, which means you are using the EXACT same program as them, not one optimized for your system.

Disadvantages:

  • You can't see/edit the source code, so you can't get optimizations, or tweak it for your specific application. Additionally, you don't really know what the program is going to do, so there could be nasty surprises waiting for you (this is why Antivirus is useful....although LESS necessary on a linux system).
  • Your system must be compatible with the Binary. For instance, you can't run a 64-bit application on a 32-bit operating system. You can't run an Intel binary for OS X on an older PowerPC-based G5 Mac.

In summary, which one is "better" is up to you. Only you can decide which one will be necessary for whatever it is you're trying to do. In most cases, using the binary is going to be just fine, and give you the least trouble. Sometimes, though, it is nice to have the source available, if only as documentation.

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