I 'm still confused for my problem after spending an amount of time to digging related posts/online resources. My sample codes (test.cc) are :


void testsub(const int* &xx );
int main ()
{
 int* xx;
 xx= new int [10];
 testsub(xx);
 }
 void testsub(const int* & xx){}

The compiling error message(pgcpp) read

"test.cc", line 7: error: a reference of type "const int *&" (not const-qualified)
cannot be initialized with a value of type "int *"
  testsub(xx);
          ^
1 error detected in the compilation of "test.cc"."

Why? Your help is appreciated. Best wishes, Ting

  • Do you want testsub to modify the pointer in main? – Neil Kirk Mar 24 '15 at 16:46
  • @NeilKirk, Originally, I wanted to use const to prevent changes to the xx in the sub. – Ting Lei Mar 24 '15 at 17:22
  • You just need const int *xx – Neil Kirk Mar 24 '15 at 17:22
  • @NeilKirk, yes, you are right. That is the "answer" suggested. Thanks. – Ting Lei Mar 24 '15 at 18:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe try this

void testsub(const int* xx );
int main ()
{
    int xx [10];
    testsub(xx);
}
void testsub(const int* xx){}

You don't need the &, because you are passing a pointer as argument.

  • Yes, this does work. Thanks a lot to all of you. After reading your posts, I think I understand this better. I didn't tell the differences between the pointers and non-pointers as the dummy arguments. Unfortunately I can only choose one answer. – Ting Lei Mar 24 '15 at 17:12

int* cannot be used where the argument type is const int* &.

Say you have:

const int a = 10;

void foo(const int* & ip)
{
   ip = &a;
}

int main()
{
   int* ip = NULL;
   foo(ip);
   *ip = 20;  // If this were allowed, you will be able to
              // indirectly modify the value of "a", which 
              // is not good.
}
  • 1
    @R Sahu, and @Mike, both your explanations are very clear for me to understand why it doesn't work. While the answer I chose directly help me realize my confusion came from omitting the differences between the pointers and non-pointers. So, I chose that as the answer. All your prompt helps are appreciated. – Ting Lei Mar 24 '15 at 17:49

As the error message says, the argument type is incompatible; the function wants a pointer to const int, while you supply a pointer to int.

If you're asking why that's incompatible: allowing it would allow you to break const-correctness, as in this example:

void testsub(const int* &xx ) {
    static const int x;
    xx = &x;
}

int* xx;
testsub(xx);  // Shouldn't be allowed, because...
*xx = 666;    // BOOM! modifying a constant object.

When you forward a "C-Array" (your int[10]), you will have a pointer to the first element of this array in your function.

void testsub(const int* xx );
int main ()
{
 int* xx;
 xx= new int [10];
 testsub(xx);
 }
 void testsub(const int* xx){}

I think you got confused by your book, because they always write something like "Call by reference". That doesn't mean to pass the parameter as a reference with the &. Often it is useful to pass also the size of the array to the function ... so it would like:

void testsub(const int* xx, size_t arraySize);
int main ()
{
 int* xx;
 xx= new int [10];
 testsub(xx, 10);
 }
 void testsub(const int* xx, size_t arraySize){}

Now you can access the array in your function and you have the possibility to check the index, if you want to access the array with an index.

void testsub(int* xx, size_t arraySize)
{
  for(size_t i=0; i<arraySize; ++i)
  //                    ^ this way you will never try to access
  //                      memory, which does not belong to the array
  //                      => no seg fault, or whatever happens
  {
    // do sth. with the array ... for example setting values to 0
    xx[i] = 0;
  }
}
  • Thank you @Mr. Yellow. That really helps. – Ting Lei Mar 24 '15 at 17:13

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.