181

I have a component that receives through props a <Link/> object from react-router. Whenever the user clicks on a 'next' button inside this component I want to invoke <Link/> object manually.

Right now, I'm using refs to access the backing instance and manually clicking on the 'a' tag that <Link/> generates.

Question: Is there a way to manually invoke the Link (e.g. this.props.next.go)?

This is the current code I have:

//in MasterPage.js
var sampleLink = <Link to="/sample">Go To Sample</Link>
<Document next={sampleLink} />

//in Document.js
...
var Document = React.createClass({
   _onClickNext: function() {
      var next = this.refs.next.getDOMNode();
      next.querySelectorAll('a').item(0).click(); //this sounds like hack to me
   },
   render: function() {
      return (
         ...
         <div ref="next">{this.props.next} <img src="rightArrow.png" onClick={this._onClickNext}/></div>
         ...
      );
   }
});
...

This is the code I would like to have:

//in MasterPage.js
var sampleLink = <Link to="/sample">Go To Sample</Link>
<Document next={sampleLink} />

//in Document.js
...
var Document = React.createClass({
   render: function() {
      return (
         ...
         <div onClick={this.props.next.go}>{this.props.next.label} <img src="rightArrow.png" /> </div>
         ...
      );
   }
});
...

9 Answers 9

307

React Router v6 - React 17+ (updated 01/14/2022)

import React, {useCallback} from 'react';
import {useNavigate} from 'react-router-dom';

export default function StackOverflowExample() {
  const navigate = useNavigate();
  const handleOnClick = useCallback(() => navigate('/sample', {replace: true}), [navigate]);

  return (
    <button type="button" onClick={handleOnClick}>
      Go home
    </button>
  );
}

Note: For this answer, the one major change between v6 and v5 is useNavigate is now the preferred React hook. useHistory is deprecated and not recommended.

React Router v5 - React 16.8+ with Hooks

If you're leveraging React Hooks, you can take advantage of the useHistory API that comes from React Router v5.

import React, {useCallback} from 'react';
import {useHistory} from 'react-router-dom';

export default function StackOverflowExample() {
  const history = useHistory();
  const handleOnClick = useCallback(() => history.push('/sample'), [history]);

  return (
    <button type="button" onClick={handleOnClick}>
      Go home
    </button>
  );
}

Another way to write the click handler if you don't want to use useCallback

const handleOnClick = () => history.push('/sample');

React Router v4 - Redirect Component

The v4 recommended way is to allow your render method to catch a redirect. Use state or props to determine if the redirect component needs to be shown (which then trigger's a redirect).

import { Redirect } from 'react-router';

// ... your class implementation

handleOnClick = () => {
  // some action...
  // then redirect
  this.setState({redirect: true});
}

render() {
  if (this.state.redirect) {
    return <Redirect push to="/sample" />;
  }

  return <button onClick={this.handleOnClick} type="button">Button</button>;
}

Reference: https://reacttraining.com/react-router/web/api/Redirect

React Router v4 - Reference Router Context

You can also take advantage of Router's context that's exposed to the React component.

static contextTypes = {
  router: PropTypes.shape({
    history: PropTypes.shape({
      push: PropTypes.func.isRequired,
      replace: PropTypes.func.isRequired
    }).isRequired,
    staticContext: PropTypes.object
  }).isRequired
};

handleOnClick = () => {
  this.context.router.push('/sample');
}

This is how <Redirect /> works under the hood.

Reference: https://github.com/ReactTraining/react-router/blob/master/packages/react-router/modules/Redirect.js#L46,L60

React Router v4 - Externally Mutate History Object

If you still need to do something similar to v2's implementation, you can create a copy of BrowserRouter then expose the history as an exportable constant. Below is a basic example but you can compose it to inject it with customizable props if needed. There are noted caveats with lifecycles, but it should always rerender the Router, just like in v2. This can be useful for redirects after an API request from an action function.

// browser router file...
import createHistory from 'history/createBrowserHistory';
import { Router } from 'react-router';

export const history = createHistory();

export default class BrowserRouter extends Component {
  render() {
    return <Router history={history} children={this.props.children} />
  }
}

// your main file...
import BrowserRouter from './relative/path/to/BrowserRouter';
import { render } from 'react-dom';

render(
  <BrowserRouter>
    <App/>
  </BrowserRouter>
);

// some file... where you don't have React instance references
import { history } from './relative/path/to/BrowserRouter';

history.push('/sample');

Latest BrowserRouter to extend: https://github.com/ReactTraining/react-router/blob/master/packages/react-router-dom/modules/BrowserRouter.js

React Router v2

Push a new state to the browserHistory instance:

import {browserHistory} from 'react-router';
// ...
browserHistory.push('/sample');

Reference: https://github.com/reactjs/react-router/blob/master/docs/guides/NavigatingOutsideOfComponents.md

13
  • 7
    hashHistory.push('/sample'); if you are using hashHistory instead of browserHistory
    – sanath_p
    Dec 21, 2016 at 22:40
  • 1
    this is especially useful in the material-ui library as using containerElement={<Link to="/" />} doesn't always invoke the link Jan 28, 2017 at 6:07
  • 3
    Note with the redirect option you must specify push (ie <Redirect push />). By default it will do a replace which is not at all the same as manually invoking a Link
    – aw04
    May 3, 2017 at 15:28
  • 1
    @jokab you can use <NavLink /> instead of <Link /> github.com/ReactTraining/react-router/blob/master/packages/…
    – Matt Lo
    Sep 19, 2017 at 3:57
  • 1
    Redirect is not working for me, but aw04 solution with withRouter is more simple and working
    – stackdave
    Jun 10, 2018 at 5:35
95

React Router 4 includes a withRouter HOC that gives you access to the history object via this.props:

import React, {Component} from 'react'
import {withRouter} from 'react-router-dom'

class Foo extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)

    this.goHome = this.goHome.bind(this)
  }

  goHome() {
    this.props.history.push('/')
  }

  render() {
    <div className="foo">
      <button onClick={this.goHome} />
    </div>
  }
}

export default withRouter(Foo)
7
  • 10
    This worked for me and it looks like most simple solution.
    – Rubycut
    Jun 27, 2017 at 12:29
  • 6
    This is the best solution. I don't nderstand why it has so few votes.
    – Benoit
    Nov 5, 2017 at 21:50
  • 1
    yes, you can click on link few times and browser back won't work. you'll need to click on browser back for a few times to really go back Mar 4, 2019 at 10:42
  • 1
    @VladyslavTereshyn you can add some conditional logic: if ((this.props.location.pathname + this.props.location.search) !== navigateToPath) { ... }
    – MattWeiler
    Apr 20, 2020 at 14:16
  • after searching for one hour, this solution finally worked. Thank you!
    – IonicMan
    Aug 17, 2021 at 15:47
25

In the version 5.x, you can use useHistory hook of react-router-dom:

// Sample extracted from https://reacttraining.com/react-router/core/api/Hooks/usehistory
import { useHistory } from "react-router-dom";

function HomeButton() {
  const history = useHistory();

  function handleClick() {
    history.push("/home");
  }

  return (
    <button type="button" onClick={handleClick}>
      Go home
    </button>
  );
}
4
  • This is the best solution. If you add some conditional logic, you can avoid duplicate entries in the history when a user clicks the same button multiple times: if ((routerHistory.location.pathname + routerHistory.location.search) !== navigateToPath) { routerHistory.push(navigateToPath); }
    – MattWeiler
    Apr 20, 2020 at 15:37
  • 1
    I needed to declare history variable, directory invoking useHistory().push is not allowed by hooks rules
    – onmyway133
    Jun 2, 2020 at 16:00
  • this seems the most modern react-ishy solution.
    – Youngjae
    Jul 30, 2020 at 9:50
  • This is neat 👌and off-course works for v5.x With arrow functions one could simply further as onClick={ () => history.push('/home') } Sep 23, 2020 at 6:37
9

https://github.com/rackt/react-router/blob/bf89168acb30b6dc9b0244360bcbac5081cf6b38/examples/transitions/app.js#L50

or you can even try executing onClick this (more violent solution):

window.location.assign("/sample");
6
  • As lines of code change, your answer will be better if you copy the details and explain your answer here. Also, assign is not a property, it's a function. Mar 25, 2015 at 10:54
  • (But you still just have a link to a specific line of a file). Please include the specific suggestion in your answer, and not just a link. Mar 25, 2015 at 15:29
  • Thanks for your answer @grechut. However, I want to make sure Document does not know anything about router at all. The behavior I'm expecting is: 'If the user clicks in the right arrow, invoke the next function'. The next function may be a link or not.
    – Alan Souza
    Mar 25, 2015 at 17:10
  • I have a couple of pages handled outside of React (login screens with FB and Google redirects) so I needed this in the nav for those pages since "browserHistory.push('/home');" only changed the URL, it was unable to route the pages. Thank you.
    – Deborah
    Jan 10, 2017 at 12:51
  • 7
    This would reload the page @grechut, not a desired behavior for an application with react router.
    – Abhas
    Feb 8, 2017 at 15:46
4

Answers here are outdated.

React Router 6

useHistory is deprecated v6 uses the useNavigate hook instead.

import { useNavigate } from 'react-router-dom'

const navigate = useNavigate()

navigate(`/somewhere`, { replace: true })
2

Ok, I think I was able to find a proper solution for that.

Now, instead of sending <Link/> as prop to Document, I send <NextLink/> which is a custom wrapper for the react-router Link. By doing that, I'm able to have the right arrow as part of the Link structure while still avoiding to have routing code inside Document object.

The updated code looks like follows:

//in NextLink.js
var React = require('react');
var Right = require('./Right');

var NextLink = React.createClass({
    propTypes: {
        link: React.PropTypes.node.isRequired
    },

    contextTypes: {
        transitionTo: React.PropTypes.func.isRequired
    },

    _onClickRight: function() {
        this.context.transitionTo(this.props.link.props.to);
    },

    render: function() {
        return (
            <div>
                {this.props.link}
                <Right onClick={this._onClickRight} />
            </div>  
        );
    }
});

module.exports = NextLink;

...
//in MasterPage.js
var sampleLink = <Link to="/sample">Go To Sample</Link>
var nextLink = <NextLink link={sampleLink} />
<Document next={nextLink} />

//in Document.js
...
var Document = React.createClass({
   render: function() {
      return (
         ...
         <div>{this.props.next}</div>
         ...
      );
   }
});
...

P.S: If you are using the latest version of react-router you may need to use this.context.router.transitionTo instead of this.context.transitionTo. This code will work fine for react-router version 0.12.X.

2

React Router 4

You can easily invoke the push method via context in v4:

this.context.router.push(this.props.exitPath);

where context is:

static contextTypes = {
    router: React.PropTypes.object,
};
5
  • Using BrowserRouter, my components' context object does't contain a router object. Am I doing anything wrong?
    – pilau
    Mar 1, 2017 at 17:54
  • Are you setting the context in the component (the second block above)?
    – Chris
    Mar 2, 2017 at 0:00
  • Thanks for chiming in! eventually this worked for me: router: React.PropTypes.object.isRequired. I don't know why it didn't work without the isRequired key. Also, <Link> seems to be able to get the history context, but I couldn't replicate it.
    – pilau
    Mar 2, 2017 at 13:36
  • Interesting one - if you put up a codepen I could help you debug it if you are still stuck
    – Chris
    Mar 2, 2017 at 13:49
  • It seems like you can use this.props.history.push() in React Router v4. I only found this by inspecting the props that React Router passes in though. It seems to work but I'm not sure if it's a good idea. Mar 16, 2017 at 14:51
0

If you'd like to extend the Link component to utilise some of the logic in it's onClick() handler, here's how:

import React from 'react';
import { Link } from "react-router-dom";

// Extend react-router-dom Link to include a function for validation.
class LinkExtra extends Link {
  render() {
    const linkMarkup = super.render();
    const { validation, ...rest} = linkMarkup.props; // Filter out props for <a>.
    const onclick = event => {
      if (!this.props.validation || this.props.validation()) {
        this.handleClick(event);
      } else {
        event.preventDefault();
        console.log("Failed validation");
      }
    }

    return(
      <a {...rest} onClick={onclick} />
    )
  }
}

export default LinkExtra;

Usage

<LinkExtra to="/mypage" validation={() => false}>Next</LinkExtra>
-1

again this is JS :) this still works ....

var linkToClick = document.getElementById('something');
linkToClick.click();

<Link id="something" to={/somewhaere}> the link </Link>

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