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I have a numpy array which I wish to segment into discrete regions with unique IDs which looks something like this:

Example array

Usually for something like this I would use scipy.ndimage.label to generate unique ids for discrete blobs, but in this case I have several very large continuous regions which I also wish to be segmented into smaller unique regions, ideally when they are only joined to their neighbours by a connection 1 cell wide. To illustrate, here's a sample array, the result I get when running scipy.ndimage.label, and my desired result:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage as ndimage
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# Sample study area array
example_array = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                          [0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1],
                          [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
                          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
                          [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1],
                          [1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1],
                          [1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1],
                          [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                          [1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0],
                          [1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
                          [1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

# Identify discrete regions and assign unique IDs
current_output, num_ids = ndimage.label(example_array, structure=np.ones((3,3)))

# Plot outputs
plt.imshow(example_array, cmap="spectral", interpolation='nearest')
plt.imshow(current_output, cmap="spectral", interpolation='nearest')

Outputs and expected outputs

The specific numbering and division of cells isn't consequential; anything resembling the last plot above will do. My best attempt so far has been to use morphological image processing to first erode my array, run scipy.ndimage.label and then dilate, but this has the unfortunate side effect of eliminating all single cell regions or thin linear features (of which there are many).

Would greatly appreciate any thoughts!

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  • 1
    is it possible to first identify the single-cell regions and thin linear features and then erode and dilate? Commented Mar 25, 2015 at 1:18
  • Thanks for reminding me tom10. Previous answer updated accordingly! Julien: that could work, but I can see issues with long, thin areas extending off the edge of larger regions which should be assigned the same unique ID, but would be separated if removed prior to erosion-dilation. Definitely worth a look, though! Commented Mar 29, 2015 at 3:11

1 Answer 1

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Easiest thing to do may be to apply the following prepossessing kernel before the SciPy labeling (with 2,2 as the origin and "?" can be 0 or 1):

IF |? 1 ?| OR |? 0 ?| THEN origin(x,y) == 0
   |0 1 0|    |1 1 1|
   |? 1 ?|    |? 0 ?|

IMPLEMENTATION:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage as ndimage
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# Sample study area array
example_array = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                          [0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1],
                          [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1],
                          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0],
                          [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1],
                          [1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1],
                          [1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1],
                          [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                          [1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0],
                          [1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
                          [1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                          [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

# Get array shape
row_count, column_count = example_array.shape

# Iterate through kernel origins
for (x,y), value in np.ndenumerate(example_array):

    # Skip first and last rows and columns because kernel would be out of bounds
    if not (x == 0 
         or x == row_count-1 
         or y == 0 
         or y == column_count-1):

        # Extract kernel
        kernel = example_array[x-1:x+2, y-1:y+2]
      
        # Apply IF |? 1 ?| OR |? 0 ?| THEN origin(x,y) == 0
        #          |0 1 0|    |1 1 1|
        #          |? 1 ?|    |? 0 ?|
        if ((kernel[1,0:3]).all() == 1 and kernel[0,1] == 0 and kernel[2,1] == 0 
            or (kernel[0:3,1]).all() == 1 and kernel[1,0] == 0 and kernel[1,2] == 0):
            example_array[x,y] = 0
                
# Identify discrete regions and assign unique IDs
current_output, num_ids = ndimage.label(example_array, structure=np.ones((3,3)))

# Plot outputs
plt.imshow(example_array, cmap="spectral", interpolation='nearest')
plt.imshow(current_output, cmap="spectral", interpolation='nearest')

RESULT: enter image description here

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  • Hi Tertiary, thanks for the reply. Can you give me a little more information on how I would implement this? Commented Jun 16, 2015 at 1:19
  • 1
    @Teriary: I appreciate the effort, but unfortunately this doesn't achieve the result I'm after, with missing habitat data between the labelled regions where instead these cells should be classified into one ID or the other (see "desired output" in the question above). Commented Aug 11, 2015 at 0:35

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