1

With the below code,

int main() {
    for(;;) {
        float d;
        cin >> d;
        cout << std::to_string(d) << endl;
    }
}

to_string seems to always return a string containing a decimal point followed by six digits. Is this behavior guaranteed (excluding nan and infinity)?

According to cplusplus.com, "as many digits are written as needed to represent the integral part, followed by the decimal-point character and six decimal digits".

2 Answers 2

4

to_string seems to always return a string containing a decimal point followed by six digits. Is this behavior guaranteed (excluding nan and infinity)?

Yes. The output of std::to_string is controlled by the output std::sprintf, whose default precision is 6.

From http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/to_string,

7,8) Converts a floating point value to a string with the same content as what std::sprintf(buf, "%f", value) would produce for sufficiently large buf.

From http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io/c/fprintf, (emphasis mine)

f, F

converts floating-point number to the decimal notation in the style [-]ddd.ddd.

Precision specifies the minimum number of digits to appear after the decimal point character. The default precision is 6.


Caveat

The decimal point is not used as the decimal marker in all locales. You might get a different character for the decimal marker depending on the locale. But a decimal marker will be there regardless of locale.

13
  • 1
    I would add the following recipe: stackoverflow.com/questions/16605967/… Commented Mar 25, 2015 at 5:09
  • These are undoubtedly the rules in effect.... but why does the comment concerning "the alternative implementation" of sprintf provide a guarantee on to_string?
    – Ben Voigt
    Commented Mar 25, 2015 at 5:12
  • @BenVoigt, the alternative implementation is not relevant to the answer. I'll remove it.
    – R Sahu
    Commented Mar 25, 2015 at 5:22
  • 1
    @BenVoigt, that's true. But that applies only if the format used is "%#f", which is not the case here.
    – R Sahu
    Commented Mar 25, 2015 at 5:25
  • 1
    @BenVoigt, the decimal point is guaranteed when "%f" is used, with 6 digits of precision. My understanding is that the # comes into play only when you use 0 digits of precision - "%#10.0f" will add the decimal point but "%10.0f" will not
    – R Sahu
    Commented Mar 25, 2015 at 5:30
3

No. The decimal point can also be a comma, depending on the computer on which the program is run (controled by $LANG on Linux or other means on Windows). The C++ documentation says:

std::to_string relies on the current locale for formatting purposes

This means that when e.g. run in Germany, std::to_string uses a comma, while when run on a computer in the US, it uses a point as separator. To enforce a dot as decimal separator, you must set the locale before calls to to_string:

#include <clocale>
std::setlocale(LC_NUMERIC, "C")

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