I have a trait called Sleep:

pub trait Sleep {
    fn sleep(&self);
}

I could provide a different implementation of sleep for every struct, but it turns out that most people sleep in a very small number of ways. You can sleep in a bed:

pub trait HasBed {
    fn sleep_in_bed(&self);
    fn jump_on_bed(&self);
}

impl Sleep for HasBed {
    fn sleep(&self) {self.sleep_in_bed()}
}

If you're camping, you can sleep in a tent:

pub trait HasTent {
    fn sleep_in_tent(&self);
    fn hide_in_tent(&self);
}

impl Sleep for HasTent {
    fn sleep(&self) {self.sleep_in_tent()}
}

There are some oddball cases. I have a friend that can sleep standing against a wall, but most people, most of the time, fall into some simple case.

We define some structs and let them sleep:

struct Jim;

impl HasBed for Jim {
    fn sleep_in_bed(&self) { }
    fn jump_on_bed(&self) { }
}

struct Jane;

impl HasTent for Jane {
   fn sleep_in_tent(&self) { }
   fn hide_in_tent(&self) { }
}


fn main() {
    use Sleep;
    let jim = Jim;
    jim.sleep();

    let jane = Jane;
    jane.sleep();
}

Uh-oh! Compile error:

error: no method named `sleep` found for type `Jim` in the current scope
  --> src/main.rs:43:9
   |
43 |     jim.sleep();
   |         ^^^^^
   |
   = help: items from traits can only be used if the trait is implemented and in scope; the following trait defines an item `sleep`, perhaps you need to implement it:
   = help: candidate #1: `Sleep`

error: no method named `sleep` found for type `Jane` in the current scope
  --> src/main.rs:46:10
   |
46 |     jane.sleep();
   |          ^^^^^
   |
   = help: items from traits can only be used if the trait is implemented and in scope; the following trait defines an item `sleep`, perhaps you need to implement it:
   = help: candidate #1: `Sleep`

This compiler error is strange because if there was something wrong with a trait implementing another trait, I expected to hear about it way back when I did that, not at the very bottom of the program when I try to use the result.

In this example, there are only 2 structs and 2 ways to sleep, but in the general case there are many structs and several ways to sleep (but not as many ways as there are structs).

A Bed is mostly an implementation for Sleep, but in the general case a Bed has many uses and could implement many things.

The only immediately obvious approach is to convert impl Sleep for... into a macro that structs themselves use, but that seems hacky and terrible.

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You need to implement the second trait for objects that implement the first trait:

impl<T> Sleep for T
where
    T: HasBed
{
    fn sleep(&self) {self.sleep_in_bed()}
}

However, this is going to break as soon as you add a second one:

impl<T> Sleep for T
where
    T:HasTent
{
    fn sleep(&self) {self.sleep_in_tent()}
}

With

error[E0119]: conflicting implementations of trait `Sleep`:
  --> src/main.rs:52:1
   |
42 | / impl<T> Sleep for T
43 | | where
44 | |     T: HasBed,
45 | | {
...  |
48 | |     }
49 | | }
   | |_- first implementation here
...
52 | / impl<T> Sleep for T
53 | | where
54 | |     T: HasTent,
55 | | {
...  |
58 | |     }
59 | | }
   | |_^ conflicting implementation

It's possible for something to implement both HasBed and HasTent. If something were to appear that implemented both, then the code would now be ambiguous.

How do you accomplish your goal? I think you have already suggested the current best solution - write a macro. This could be considered a stopgap until you can write your own deriving. Macros really aren't that bad, but they can be unwieldy to write.

Another thing, which may be entirely based on the names you chose for your example, would be to simply embed structs into other structs, optionally making them public. Since your implementation of Sleep basically only depends on the bed / tent, no functionality would be lost by doing this. Of course, some people might feel that breaks encapsulation. You could again create macros to implement a delegation of sorts.

trait Sleep { fn sleep(&self); }

struct Bed;
impl Bed { fn jump(&self) {} }
impl Sleep for Bed { fn sleep(&self) {} }

struct Tent;
impl Tent { fn hide(&self) {} }
impl Sleep for Tent { fn sleep(&self) {} }

struct Jim { bed: Bed }
struct Jane { tent: Tent }

fn main() {
    let jim = Jim { bed: Bed };
    jim.bed.sleep();
}
  • Couldn't this (in theory) be disambiguated on the caller's side with something like use HasBed;? – Drew Mar 25 '15 at 13:37
  • I don't know the compiler details to make an educated guess about how complicated it would be to enable. – Shepmaster Mar 25 '15 at 13:47
  • 1
    @Drew The problem isn't implementing something like that, it's finding a good design that is desirable from a language design perspective. And motivating it (it would be a significant addition for solving problems that can be solved differently). – user395760 Mar 25 '15 at 16:42
  • 1
    Within the existing constraints of the language, what's the best way to go here? This is a good "you can't do it this way" type answer, but it doesn't really address the question's motivation. Preprocessor macros? Is there some other design pattern that should be considered? – Drew Mar 26 '15 at 1:07
  • @Drew I don't have any good suggestions for you, but I updated to add what suggestions I do have. Now that you've addressed the high-level question about traits implementing traits, you might also consider asking a separate lower-level question with more details about your real use case. That might give people smarter than me the ability to give you an answer! ^_^ – Shepmaster Mar 26 '15 at 2:08

We can use associated items here.

pub trait Sleep: Sized {
    type Env: SleepEnv;

    fn sleep(&self, env: &Self::Env) {
        env.do_sleep(self);
    }

    fn get_name(&self) -> &'static str;
}

pub trait SleepEnv {
    fn do_sleep<T: Sleep>(&self, &T);
}

Then, we implement two different sleep environments.

struct Bed;
struct Tent;

impl SleepEnv for Bed {
    fn do_sleep<T: Sleep>(&self, person: &T) {
        println!("{} is sleeping in bed", person.get_name());
    }
}

impl SleepEnv for Tent {
    fn do_sleep<T: Sleep>(&self, person: &T) {
        println!("{} is sleeping in tent", person.get_name());
    }
}

The last piece is the concrete implementations of them.

struct Jim;
struct Jane;

impl Sleep for Jim {
    type Env = Bed;
    fn get_name(&self) -> &'static str {
        "Jim"
    }
}

impl Sleep for Jane {
    type Env = Tent;
    fn get_name(&self) -> &'static str {
        "Jane"
    }
}

Test code:

fn main() {
    let bed = Bed;
    let tent = Tent;

    let jim = Jim;
    let jane = Jane;
    jim.sleep(&bed);
    jane.sleep(&tent);
}

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