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Brief Summary

I have a page that I'm using to list a set of divs. They expand to the full width of the page and the sizes are determined by percentages.

I've added 3 buttons at the top that use a bit of jQuery to control the layout of these divs. For example if state one is active (the default) then the divs have 100% width and a max-height of 400px (width set to 100%). When the second button is pressed and state 2 is activated the divs assume 50% width and are ordered 2 in each row. When state 3 is activated via the third button its divs widths assume 33% and are ordered 3 in each row.

How I've set it out is to add a CSS class to the div via jQuery to express the state that it's currently in. Everytime a new state is called both opposing states are removed via jQuery just to cover all of the bases no matter what state it's currently in.

All of this works absolutely fine.

The Problem

I'm wanting to make the transition between states as smooth as possible. Although adding a transition effect of ease-in-out allows for smooth resizing. The actual movement of a div onto a new line is instantaneous. I would much prefer for a transitional movement from its position below to the row above, rather than it jumping instantly.

To demonstrate the desired transition, please check this fiddle - http://jsfiddle.net/Mke7E/

Although this works, it's based on media queries and that's obviously not what I'm using. Along with that it uses fixed widths/heights and after a little play around I'm unable to replicate the functionality and incorporate it into my own.

I've seen multiple sites using this through colleagues at work, unfortunately I can't quite remember any presently or I would be inspecting their code to understand it better myself.

Demonstration of my issue

CodePen: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/MYLByw

If you notice the difference of how from state 1 to 2 is a jump from the second div to the top row, yet in the jsfiddle from my description it will nearly transition across to the top right from below. That is what I am attempting to achieve.

My code

jQuery

$( "a.full" ).on("click", function(e) {
    $( "div.box" ).removeClass( "half third" ).addClass("full");
    e.preventDefault();
});
$( "a.half" ).on("click", function(e) {
    $( "div.box" ).removeClass( "full third" ).addClass("half");
    e.preventDefault();
});
$( "a.third" ).on("click", function(e) {
    $( "div.box" ).removeClass( "half full" ).addClass("third");
    e.preventDefault();
});

HTML

<a href="#" class="full">STATE 1</a>
<a href="#" class="half">STATE 2</a>
<a href="#" class="third">STATE 3</a>

<div class="box">SOME CONTENT</div>
<div class="box">SOME CONTENT</div>
<div class="box">SOME CONTENT</div>
<div class="box">SOME CONTENT</div>
<div class="box">SOME CONTENT</div>
<div class="box">SOME CONTENT</div>

CSS:

div.box {
    width: 100%;
    left: auto;
    background-size: 100%;
    background-position: center center;
    height: 100%; 
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    position: relative;
    display: block;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    background:red;
    text-align: center;
    transition: all 400ms ease-in-out;
    transform-origin: 50% 50%;
    white-space:nowrap; 
}
div.box.half {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 49%;
    white-space:nowrap;    
}

div.box.third {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 33%;
    white-space:nowrap;
}

a {
    width:100%;
    display:block;
}
  • 2
    In your fiddle it works, because you are actually transitioning the margin of the element, and that margin is what results in the “position” of the element. In your codepen however you are relying on the normal layout flow, i.e. the automatically determined position of the elements – and that you can not transition. If you want to achieve this, you need a script that calculates positions, and then explicitly positions the elements there. – CBroe Mar 25 '15 at 16:10
  • @CBroe yes indeed, I understand how the first jsfiddle works, I was curious as to how to achieve this given the way I do things shown within my codepen. Thank you though, it seems you've confirmed my fears that I will have to become a fair bit more clued up on jQuery in order to solve this properly. – Joe Corby Mar 25 '15 at 16:14
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    Anyway Joe, while we (web developers) may resize often our browsers to test our responsive "in progress" designs the actual future users of your web (well, the big mayorite) won't ever do it. They will just see one layout or another depending on platform they are using. I would not waste much time trying to recreate layout changes in a smooth way (and I would never use that solution changing margins. SO many stuff can go wrong). Just my humble opinion – Alvaro Menéndez Mar 25 '15 at 16:47
  • @AlvaroMenéndez - Absolutely and normally I'd just tell the project manager that it's not happening / isn't a feature worth bothering with due to time constraints. However this has been passed to me as an internal project and with emphasis behind making everything as smooth as possible. If anyone is curious, this has solved my problem - vestride.github.io/Shuffle – Joe Corby Mar 26 '15 at 8:34
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http://vestride.github.io/Shuffle/

This was the most applicable answer I came to in the end. With a few tweaks this can be adapted to repeat the exact functionality I desired. Worth a look for future viewers.

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