While I was trying to investigate performance issue with queries, I found that the source was this query. I am using Rails 4 with Mongoid gem.

Order.where("customer.email" => /\Atest@email.com\z/i) where test@email.com is just an example.

Customer is an embedded document in Order document and customer's email is indexed.

When I benchmarked performance using Benchmark.bmbm where Order.where("customer.email" => /\Atest@email.com\z/i).count was repeated 100 times, I got the following result.

       user     system      total        real
   0.090000   0.010000   0.100000 ( 27.656723)

I thought perhaps \A and \z was causing the slowness, so I tried the following where it looks for emails that start with given argument: Order.where("customer.email" => /^test/i).count

And result wasn't much different.

       user     system      total        real
   0.090000   0.010000   0.100000 ( 28.712883)

As the last resort, I tried just matching the entire string without regexp. This time, it made a huge difference: Order.where("customer.email" => "test@email.com").count

       user     system      total        real
   0.080000   0.000000   0.080000 (  0.122888)

When I looked at output of explain, it shows that using regexp scans all documents.

{
                     "cursor" => "BtreeCursor customer.email_1",
                 "isMultiKey" => false,
                          "n" => 781,
            "nscannedObjects" => 781,
                   "nscanned" => 500000,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" => 781,
           "nscannedAllPlans" => 500000,
               "scanAndOrder" => false,
                  "indexOnly" => false,
                    "nYields" => 1397,
                "nChunkSkips" => 0,
                     "millis" => 406,
            "indexBounds" => {
    "customer.email" => [
        [0] [
            [0] "",
            [1] {}
        ],
        [1] [
            [0] /test/i,
            [1] /test/i
        ]
    ]
  }
}

While using entire string only scanned subset, which was what I expected.

{
                     "cursor" => "BtreeCursor customer.email_1",
                 "isMultiKey" => false,
                          "n" => 230,
            "nscannedObjects" => 230,
                   "nscanned" => 230,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" => 230,
           "nscannedAllPlans" => 230,
               "scanAndOrder" => false,
                  "indexOnly" => false,
                    "nYields" => 1,
                "nChunkSkips" => 0,
                     "millis" => 0,
            "indexBounds" => {
    "customer.email" => [
        [0] [
            [0] "test@email.com",
            [1] "test@email.com"
        ]
    ]
  }
}

Can someone please explain to me why using regexp in mongodb query causes it to scan all documents instead of index?

EDIT: Added indexBounds in the explain output, which was omitted in the original post.

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The quick version:

You have a case-insensitive regex here (the /i flag); that means that Mongo can't do prefix matching on the index, and thus has to scan the entire index (since it doesn't know if you want test@example.com or TEST@example.com or teST@exAMple.com or whatnot).

If you want case-insensitive lookups in Mongo, the correct solution is to downcase them prior to storage. If you need to not affect the user-entered input, then store it in a secondary field on the document (ie, email and email_normalized).

The longer version

Mongo's indexes are B-Trees, and when you perform a regex query, it will see a) if it can use an index (by field) and b) how much of that tree it has to scan to be assured of a result. In the case where you have a specific prefix, Mongo knows that it can limit its search to only a portion of the tree. You left out the most important part of your explains - the index bounds. Given a collection with an index and some emails:

kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.ensureIndex({email: 1})
kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.insert({email: "test@example.com"})
kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.insert({email: "teTE@example.com"})
kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.insert({email: "teST@example.com"})
kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.insert({email: "TEst@example.com"})

If we explain the find on a non-case-insensitive match:

kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.find({email: /\Atest@example.com\z/}).explain()
{
        "cursor" : "IndexCursor email_1 multi",
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "n" : 1,
        "nscannedObjects" : 1,
        "nscanned" : 1,
        "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 1,
        "nscannedAllPlans" : 1,
        "scanAndOrder" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "millis" : 0,
        "indexBounds" : {
                "email" : [
                        [
                                "test@example",
                                "test@examplf"
                        ],
                        [
                                /\Atest@example.com\z/,
                                /\Atest@example.com\z/
                        ]
                ]
        },
        "server" : "luna:27019"
}

You'll see that it only has to scan one document, and that the scan upper and lower bounds are well-defined ("test@example".."test@examplf"). This is because Mongo looks at the prefix and says "That explicit prefix is guaranteed to be in every matching result", and thus knows that it can limit the portion of the index that it has to scan.

If we add the /i flag though:

kerrigan:PRIMARY> db.test.find({email: /\Atest@example.com\z/i}).explain()
{
        "cursor" : "IndexCursor email_1 multi",
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "n" : 3,
        "nscannedObjects" : 3,
        "nscanned" : 4,
        "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 3,
        "nscannedAllPlans" : 4,
        "scanAndOrder" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "millis" : 0,
        "indexBounds" : {
                "email" : [
                        [
                                "",
                                {

                                }
                        ],
                        [
                                /\Atest@example.com\z/i,
                                /\Atest@example.com\z/i
                        ]
                ]
        },
        "server" : "luna:27019"
}

Suddenly those index bounds are "".."", or a full index scan; because there's no guaranteed static prefix for the field, Mongo has to scan and check each value in the index to see if it matches your provided regex.

  • Thank you, Chris, for the quick answer. You are indeed right. Removing /i/ flag scanned a lot less documents. Another mystery resolved! – yangtheman Mar 25 '15 at 19:00
  • I made original comment before the long explanation. I edited original post to include indexBounds, which match Chris' explanation. – yangtheman Mar 25 '15 at 19:11

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