I think I can't read a binary file with the Scripting.FileSystemObject class. Can I do it with ADODB.Stream?

Something else?

I want to get an array of bytes.

thanks.

It also works to read the file as a binary, and then use VBScript to transform the object that comes back (an array of variant) into a Javascript array of bytes. To do that you need to mix VBScript and Javascript together using a .wsf file. You still need ADODB.Stream.

<job id="Something">
  <script id="BFRHelper.vbs" language="VBScript">
    Public Function VbBinaryToArray(Binary)
        Dim i
        ReDim byteArray(LenB(Binary))
        For i = 1 To LenB(Binary)
            byteArray(i-1) = AscB(MidB(Binary, i, 1))
        Next
        VbBinaryToArray = byteArray
    End Function
  </script>

  <script language="JavaScript" id="BFR2.js">

    (function(){

        BinaryFileReader = {};

        var FileReadTypes = {
            adTypeBinary : 1,
            adTypeText   : 2
        };

        BinaryFileReader.ReadAllBytes = function(path)
        {
            var bs = WScript.CreateObject("ADODB.Stream");
            bs.Type = FileReadTypes.adTypeBinary;
            bs.Open();
            bs.LoadFromFile(path);
            var what = bs.Read;
            bs.Close();
            var array = VbBinaryToArray(what).toArray();
            // I find the length property is 1 higher than it ought to be
            var aL = array.length;
            array.length = aL -1;
            return array;
        };
    })();

    var content = BinaryFileReader.ReadAllBytes(path); 

  </script>
</job>
  • This is the way to go. The only solution both complete and correct. – Eugene Ryabtsev Sep 6 '13 at 11:08
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I looked and found Reading and Writing Binary Files using JScript on codeproject.

Not quite what I wanted, but pretty close.

It uses ADODB.Stream to read a local file. It's apparently not possible to read a binary file using Scripting.FileSystemObject in a general way, because it's not possible to set the codepage using fso. fso always uses the ambient codepage, which means results will vary depending on the machine's configuration. ADODB.Stream allows the program to specify the codepage. The next step is to map from the "text" read into a regular hex byte. That's the part that the above article provides.

The result I used with success is below.

// BinaryFileReader.js
// ------------------------------------------------------------------
//
// give the ability to read a binary file into an array of bytes,
// to Javascript.
//
// the mapping is based on code from:
//   http://www.codeproject.com/KB/scripting/Exsead7.aspx
//
// Created    : Fri May 28 05:20:31 2010
// Last-saved : <2010-May-28 06:01:34>
//
// ------------------------------------------------------------------

(function(){

    BinaryFileReader = {};

    var FileReadTypes = {
        adTypeBinary : 1,
        adTypeText   : 2
    };

    var backward = [];
    backward['C7']   = '80';
    backward['FC']   = '81';
    backward['E9']   = '82';
    backward['E2']   = '83';
    backward['E4']   = '84';
    backward['E0']   = '85';
    backward['E5']   = '86';
    backward['E7']   = '87';
    backward['EA']   = '88';
    backward['EB']   = '89';
    backward['E8']   = '8A';
    backward['EF']   = '8B';
    backward['EE']   = '8C';
    backward['EC']   = '8D';
    backward['C4']   = '8E';
    backward['C5']   = '8F';
    backward['C9']   = '90';
    backward['E6']   = '91';
    backward['C6']   = '92';
    backward['F4']   = '93';
    backward['F6']   = '94';
    backward['F2']   = '95';
    backward['FB']   = '96';
    backward['F9']   = '97';
    backward['FF']   = '98';
    backward['D6']   = '99';
    backward['DC']   = '9A';
    backward['A2']   = '9B';
    backward['A3']   = '9C';
    backward['A5']   = '9D';
    backward['20A7'] = '9E';
    backward['192']  = '9F';
    backward['E1']   = 'A0';
    backward['ED']   = 'A1';
    backward['F3']   = 'A2';
    backward['FA']   = 'A3';
    backward['F1']   = 'A4';
    backward['D1']   = 'A5';
    backward['AA']   = 'A6';
    backward['BA']   = 'A7';
    backward['BF']   = 'A8';
    backward['2310'] = 'A9';
    backward['AC']   = 'AA';
    backward['BD']   = 'AB';
    backward['BC']   = 'AC';
    backward['A1']   = 'AD';
    backward['AB']   = 'AE';
    backward['BB']   = 'AF';
    backward['2591'] = 'B0';
    backward['2592'] = 'B1';
    backward['2593'] = 'B2';
    backward['2502'] = 'B3';
    backward['2524'] = 'B4';
    backward['2561'] = 'B5';
    backward['2562'] = 'B6';
    backward['2556'] = 'B7';
    backward['2555'] = 'B8';
    backward['2563'] = 'B9';
    backward['2551'] = 'BA';
    backward['2557'] = 'BB';
    backward['255D'] = 'BC';
    backward['255C'] = 'BD';
    backward['255B'] = 'BE';
    backward['2510'] = 'BF';
    backward['2514'] = 'C0';
    backward['2534'] = 'C1';
    backward['252C'] = 'C2';
    backward['251C'] = 'C3';
    backward['2500'] = 'C4';
    backward['253C'] = 'C5';
    backward['255E'] = 'C6';
    backward['255F'] = 'C7';
    backward['255A'] = 'C8';
    backward['2554'] = 'C9';
    backward['2569'] = 'CA';
    backward['2566'] = 'CB';
    backward['2560'] = 'CC';
    backward['2550'] = 'CD';
    backward['256C'] = 'CE';
    backward['2567'] = 'CF';
    backward['2568'] = 'D0';
    backward['2564'] = 'D1';
    backward['2565'] = 'D2';
    backward['2559'] = 'D3';
    backward['2558'] = 'D4';
    backward['2552'] = 'D5';
    backward['2553'] = 'D6';
    backward['256B'] = 'D7';
    backward['256A'] = 'D8';
    backward['2518'] = 'D9';
    backward['250C'] = 'DA';
    backward['2588'] = 'DB';
    backward['2584'] = 'DC';
    backward['258C'] = 'DD';
    backward['2590'] = 'DE';
    backward['2580'] = 'DF';
    backward['3B1']  = 'E0';
    backward['DF']   = 'E1';
    backward['393']  = 'E2';
    backward['3C0']  = 'E3';
    backward['3A3']  = 'E4';
    backward['3C3']  = 'E5';
    backward['B5']   = 'E6';
    backward['3C4']  = 'E7';
    backward['3A6']  = 'E8';
    backward['398']  = 'E9';
    backward['3A9']  = 'EA';
    backward['3B4']  = 'EB';
    backward['221E'] = 'EC';
    backward['3C6']  = 'ED';
    backward['3B5']  = 'EE';
    backward['2229'] = 'EF';
    backward['2261'] = 'F0';
    backward['B1']   = 'F1';
    backward['2265'] = 'F2';
    backward['2264'] = 'F3';
    backward['2320'] = 'F4';
    backward['2321'] = 'F5';
    backward['F7']   = 'F6';
    backward['2248'] = 'F7';
    backward['B0']   = 'F8';
    backward['2219'] = 'F9';
    backward['B7']   = 'FA';
    backward['221A'] = 'FB';
    backward['207F'] = 'FC';
    backward['B2']   = 'FD';
    backward['25A0'] = 'FE';
    backward['A0']   = 'FF';

    var hD="0123456789ABCDEF";

    var d2h = function(d)
    {
        var h = hD.substr(d&15,1);
        while(d>15) {d>>>=4;h=hD.substr(d&15,1)+h;}
        return h;
    }

    var h2d = function(h)
    {
        return parseInt(h,16);
    }

    var toByteArray = function(inString) {
        var encArray = [];
        var sL = inString.length;
        for (var i=0;i<sL;i++) {
            var cc = inString.charCodeAt(i);
            if(cc>=128) {
                var h = backward[''+d2h(cc)];
                cc = h2d(h);
            }
            encArray.push(cc);
        }
        return encArray;
    }


    var _internalReadAll = function(path) {
        var bs = WScript.CreateObject("ADODB.Stream")
        bs.Type = FileReadTypes.adTypeText;
        bs.CharSet = '437';
        bs.Open();
        bs.LoadFromFile(path);
        var what = bs.ReadText;
        bs.Close();
        return what;
    }

    BinaryFileReader.ReadAllBytes = function(name)
    {
        var string = _internalReadAll(name);
        return toByteArray(string);
    }

})();

And usage is:

    var bytes = BinaryFileReader.ReadAllBytes(filename);
  • How does it work in other locales? Your backward translation seems pre-set. Is it possible to costruct the translation at run-time somehow? – Eugene Ryabtsev Sep 6 '13 at 11:03

If you prefer pure jScript with COM objects, maybe my method could be useful. It creates a jscript string from binary data. I prefer to use COM objects instead code page translations because speed.

//Reads a binary file, returns a string
function binaryFileToString(fileName) {
    var binStream = new ActiveXObject("ADODB.Stream");
    var fs = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject");
    var size = (fs.getFile(fileName)).size;

    binStream.Type = 1; //adTypeBinary
    binStream.Open;

    binStream.loadFromFile(fileName);
    var binVariant = binStream.read();
    var adLongVarChar = 201;
    var RS = new ActiveXObject("ADODB.Recordset");

    RS.fields.append("mBinary", adLongVarChar, size);
    RS.open();
    RS.addNew();
    RS("mBinary").appendChunk(binVariant);
    RS.update();
    return RS("mBinary").value;
};
  • This seems to work exactly like FSO File.OpenAsTextStream(1).ReadAll(). – Eugene Ryabtsev Sep 6 '13 at 11:00
Function ReadByteArray(strFileName)
Const adTypeBinary = 1
Dim bin
    Set bin = CreateObject("ADODB.Stream")
    bin.Type = adTypeBinary
    bin.Open
    bin.LoadFromFile strFileName
    ReadByteArray = bin.Read
End Function

From http://www.ericphelps.com/q193998/index.htm

  • 2
    hmm, translating that to Javascript didn't solve the problem. The issue is that the thing obtained from bin.Read is not a Javascript byte array. It's an array of variants. To use that code, it's necessary to map from the variant array to a JS byte array. See my code stackoverflow.com/questions/2926504/… – Cheeso May 28 '10 at 10:49

Cheeso’s answer works, and yields an array of numbers. An alternative is to replace line 5 with

a.push(ts.Read(1));

This yields an array of single characters instead of an array of numbers. On my system (Windows 7 64-bit), writing the bytes one at a time in a loop is too slow, even though cheeso’s seemingly equivalent reading function is acceptably fast. Writing an array in one Write yields commas separating the bytes. But bytes represented by an array of single characters can be written by the function

function WriteByte (File, Byte) {
    var Text = "";
    for (I = 0; I < Byte.length; I ++) Text += Byte [I];
    File.Write (Text);
}

(in which File is opened for ASCII) which is acceptably fast in my application. (There is a bug in JavaScript on my system that, if a string containing null characters is passed to a function, in the function the .length property of the string is correct but every character after the first null character is null (as distinct from the null character). However, in the here-cited function, null characters in Text are managed correctly as well as expeditiously.)

Another advantage of representing bytes by characters instead of numbers is that each byte is represented by two bytes instead of four. Of course, the disadvantage is that many operations on the bytes require the .charCodeAt (0) method.

Read the bytes of a file, in jscript.

    function readAllBytes(path) {
        var fso = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject"),
            ts = fso.OpenTextFile(path, 1), a = [];
        while (!ts.AtEndOfStream)
            a.push(ts.Read(1).charCodeAt(0));

        ts.Close();
        return a;
    }
  • Nah, this one is no good. Does Unicode translation. – Eugene Ryabtsev Sep 6 '13 at 11:07
  • how to read binary and convert to hexadecimal when reading? Using your code, not using ADODB.Stream – Cobaia Sep 25 '13 at 14:08
  • ActiveXObject has been deprecated, only worked in IE. It should NOT be used, even if working in some browsers – Pian0_M4n Aug 31 '14 at 17:47

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