70

With the code below, I am getting the following error in IntelliJ IDEA 13.1.6 and Kotlin plugin 0.11.91.AndroidStudio.3:

Platform declaration clash: The following declarations have the same JVM signature (getName()Ljava/lang/String;):
  • public open fun getName(): kotlin.String?
  • internal final fun <get-name>(): kotlin.String?

Java class, JavaInterface.java:

public interface JavaInterface {
  public String getName();
}

Kotlin class, KotlinClass.kt

public class KotlinClass(val name: String?) : JavaInterface

I've tried overriding the 'getter' method by adding override fun getName(): String? = name, but that produces the same error.

I can see one workaround by doing this instead:

public class KotlinClass(val namePrivate: String?) : JavaInterface {
  override fun getName(): String? = namePrivate
}

But in my real-world case I have a number of properties to implement and need setters too. Doing this for each property doesn't seem very Kotlin-ish. What am I missing?

7
  • 17
    You can not override Java methods with Kotlin properties at the moment. It would be nice if we could support it, but we don't know how to do it consistently for mixed hierarchies Mar 26, 2015 at 21:27
  • 1
    what about adding a more desccriptive error message? saying that you can't override java methods with properties...it would be less cofusing
    – ycomp
    Feb 27, 2016 at 3:52
  • 1
    I guess the best is to rewrite the interface in Kotlin...
    – corlaez
    Jun 7, 2016 at 2:30
  • 1
    Any update on overriding getter/setter methods with Kotlin properties? All these answers feel like workarounds to avoid the name clash issue, and most of the time you just want to return the property anyway. @lrn2code This will not work either. If you have a Kotlin class class KotlinClass(var name: String) : SomeInterface and a Kotlin interface interface SomeInterface { fun getName(): String }, this will produce the same error during compilation as using the original Java interface.
    – breandan
    Jul 12, 2017 at 19:41
  • Ah, I see now. A better solution is to use properties directly in interfaces when rewriting them in Kotlin: kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/… Still doesn't help when you need to work with Java.
    – breandan
    Jul 12, 2017 at 19:52

10 Answers 10

72

Making that variable private solves the problem.

public class KotlinClass(private val name: String?) : JavaInterface

3
  • 1
    I don't know if that was possible in Kotlin 0.11, but it works in 1.1 and feels better than having different variable names. Jun 27, 2017 at 16:03
  • 3
    If variable needs to be public?
    – Erlan
    May 17, 2018 at 8:13
  • Doesn't work for me in Kotlin 1.2: > Class 'KotlinClass' is not abstract and does not implement abstract member public abstract fun getName(): String! defined in JavaInterface Feb 8, 2019 at 12:40
14

You could use @JvmField for instructs the compiler not generate getter/setter, and you can implement your setters and getters. With this your code work well in Java (as attribute getter/setter) and Kotlin as property

Example: JAVA:

public interface Identifiable<ID extends Serializable> 
{
   ID getId();
} 

KOTLIN:

class IdentifiableImpl(@JvmField var id: String) :Identifiable<String> 
{
   override fun getId(): String 
   {
       TODO("not implemented")
   }
}
2
  • 3
    This strikes me as the best answer. It directly addresses the issue and works for other cases where the accepted answer won't. May 5, 2018 at 3:23
  • Exactly, as @RobertLiberatore said this should be the accepted answer.
    – tolkinski
    Feb 23, 2020 at 11:38
7

The annotation feature of Kotlin named @JvmName will solve the duplication problem in Java and Kotlin when having the same signature.

fun function(p: String) {
   // ...
}

// Signature: function(Ljava/lang/String)

With the use of JvmName will be:

@JvmName("functionOfKotlin")
fun function(p: String) {
   // ...
}

// Signature: functionOfKotlin(Ljava/lang/String)
5

IMHO most readable combination is field + explicit interface implementation by the single-expression function (combination of @Renato Garcia's and @Steven Spungin's answers):

Java:

public inteface SomeInterface {
    String getFoo();
}

Kotlin:

class Implementation(@JvmField val foo: String) : SomeInterface {
    override fun getFoo() = foo
}
3

Another work-around is to declare the properties in an abstract Kotlin class, then write a small java class that extends KotlinClass and implements JavaInterface.

// JavaInterface.java
public interface JavaInterface {
    int getFoo();
    void setFoo(int value);
}

// KotlinClass.kt
abstract class KotlinClass(open var foo : Int = 0) {
}

// JavaAdapter.java
class JavaAdapter extends KotlinClass implements JavaInterface {
    // all code in KotlinClass, but can't implement JavaInterface there
    // because kotlin properties cannot override java methods.
}
3

We have found that to use the same names without clashing, the ctor args must be private AND you must still override the interfaces methods. You don't need any additional backing fields. Also, your expression body assignment will not recurse, so you can safely use that syntax.

Java Interface

interface IUser {
    String getUserScope();
    String getUserId();
}

Kotlin Class

class SampleUser(private val userScope: String, private val userId: String) : IUser {
    override fun getUserId() = userId
    override fun getUserScope() = userScope
}
2

If you have direct control over the interface then the best approach is to write the interface in Kotlin. You can then write your class

public class KotlinClass(override val name: String?) : KotlinInterface

and still reference it from any Java code using the same interface as before. This looks a lot neater than setting all the properties to private and overriding the get function. Obviously if you can't migrate the interface to Java because you don't own it then that seems to be the only solution.

1

Rename the variable to something else, or make it private if u dont want it to be public.

0
public interface JavaInterface {
    public String getName();
}

public class KotlinClass(val namePrivate: String?) : JavaInterface {

private var name = namePrivate

    override fun getName(): String? {
        return name
    }
}
0

convert function to property instead of initializing property from a function. for ex:

    fun getCountriesList(): List<Country> {
    val countries = mutableListOf<Country>()
    countries.add(Country("in", "+91", "India", R.drawable.indian_flag))
    countries.add(Country("us", "+1", "United States",R.drawable.us_flag))
    return countries
}

to

 val countriesList: List<Country>
    get() {
        val countries = mutableListOf<Country>()
        countries.add(Country("in", "+91", "India", R.drawable.indian_flag))
        countries.add(Country("us", "+1", "United States", R.drawable.us_flag))
        return countries
    }

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